Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
foreach (var item in mainCanvas.Children)
{
    if (item is Button)
    {
        (item as Button).Content = "this is a button";
    }                
}

Can I use LINQ or other feature of .NET 4 to be more concise (maybe performant)?

share|improve this question
1  
Please read item 3 of effective C#. How about this: Button castedItem = null; foreach ... castedItem = item as Button; if (castedItem != null) { // do work here } } // end foreach. That way you are cutting the use of reflection into 2, this gaining some speed-up. A LINQ query should be as performant, probably more readable. –  Hamish Grubijan Sep 30 '10 at 16:16
    
Concise and performant are sometimes at odds. If this is a deep inner loop, profiling indicates you have a performance problem here and the collection under consideration is an array, you can get better performance by indexing with a standard for loop. –  Dan Bryant Sep 30 '10 at 17:09
    
@Dan Bryant, see Item 11 of "Effective C#" titled "Prefer foreach loops". The JIT compiler is not dumb and does not need help. This was true back in .Net 1.1, so it cannot be less true now. I would be surprised ... if for ever beats non-stupidly constructed foreach in C#. –  Hamish Grubijan Sep 30 '10 at 17:33
    
@Hamish, I encountered a specific case where this was beneficial (specific target was .NET 3.5 for Silverlight), but the improvement was only noticeable because the inner loop was being invoked millions of times. I definitely agree that it's best to prefer foreach and LINQ. –  Dan Bryant Sep 30 '10 at 18:20
    
@Dan Bryant, do you think you could paste an example of what the code looked like? I am quite curious now. –  Hamish Grubijan Sep 30 '10 at 19:26

5 Answers 5

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You can use Enumerable.OfType:

foreach (var button in mainCanvas.Children.OfType<Button>())
{
    button.Content = "this is a button";
}

Performance Measurements

Method 1: OPs original suggestion

foreach (var item in mainCanvas.Children)
{
    if (item is Button)
    {
        (item as Button).Content = "this is a button";
    }                
}

Method 2: OfType

foreach (var button in mainCanvas.Children.OfType<Button>())
{
    button.Content = "this is a button";
}

Method 3: Only cast once

foreach (var item in mainCanvas.Children)
{
    Button button = item as Button;
    if (button != null)
    {
        button.Content = "this is a button";
    }                
}

Method 4: for loop:

List<object> children = mainCanvas.Children;
for (int i = 0; i < children.Count; ++i)
{
    object item = children[i];
    if (item is Button)
    {
        (item as Button).Content = "this is a button";
    }                
}

Results

Iterations per second

Method 1: 18539180
Method 2:  7376857
Method 3: 19280965
Method 4: 20739241

Conclusion

  • The biggest improvement can be gained by using a simple for loop instead of foreach.
  • It is also possible to improve performance slightly by casting only once.
  • Using OfType is considerably slower.

But remember to optimize readability first, and only optimize performance if you have performance profiled and found that this specific code is the performance bottleneck.

share|improve this answer
    
Looks like a winner to me - short and fast. Doing stuff with lambdas seems like an overkill. –  Hamish Grubijan Sep 30 '10 at 16:19
    
Will it be more performant that the initial example version? –  serhio Sep 30 '10 at 16:26
    
@Mark Byers: Buttons was for the example purpose. In application I have a graph with a huge number of curves. I select them and move... –  serhio Sep 30 '10 at 16:55
    
I think performance-wise IEnumerable<T>.OfType() will do just as fine as original post. So if you want concise, there is a one-liner solution here, if performance is critical, I believe for-loop performs better than foreach and List.ForEach(), but that is marginal. –  danijels Sep 30 '10 at 17:14
    
@serhio: The best way to find out which is fastest is to measure it. I've updated my answer with some measurements I've made. –  Mark Byers Sep 30 '10 at 17:42

One line should do it

mainCanvas.Children.OfType<Button>.ToList().ForEach(b => b.Content = "this is a button");
share|improve this answer
    
maybe this is concise, but the I doubt about readability... useful however.. –  serhio Sep 30 '10 at 16:14
    
That is always debatable, but this is just to answer the question, which was, after all, about it being concise. Everyone should take whatever flavor suits them. –  danijels Sep 30 '10 at 16:17
    
Turning an iterator into a List, and then iterating over it is expensive. –  Hamish Grubijan Sep 30 '10 at 16:17
    
That depends on the contents of .Children. If there is hundreds of items and only 3-4 buttons, this should be a good way. Can't tell here. –  danijels Sep 30 '10 at 16:19
    
@hamish-grubijan: foreach should do the same thing, isn't it? –  serhio Sep 30 '10 at 16:20

See if there is an OfType<T> extension.

foreach (var item in mainCanvas.Children.OfType<Button>()) 
{ 
    item.Content = "this is a button"; 
}

If not, you can use:

foreach (var item in mainCanvas.Children.Where(item=>item is Button).Cast<Button>()) 
{ 
    item.Content = "this is a button"; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
If there is not an OfType extension there will also not be a Where or a Cast extension. All 3 methods have existed since the first version of Enumerable class. Also Where cannot be used UIElementCollection as it not generic. –  Bear Monkey Sep 30 '10 at 16:32

Not that it's particularly superior, but there is something nice about this syntax:

Using LINQ and the Microsoft ReactiveExtensions framework,

mainCanvas.Children
   .OfType<Button>()
   .Do(b => b.Content = "I'm a button!")
   .Run();
share|improve this answer

To only iterate over actual buttons in a collection, you can do:

foreach(Button button in mainCanvas.Children)
     button.Content = "this is a button";

As far as I understand, this is syntax sugar that gets converted into Method 4 above. But don't quote me on that. (EDIT: Method 3 I meant)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.