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How can I create a function, that will call another function, and when it completes, fire another callback function?

so existing functions are:

function f1(..) {..}

function myCallback() {...}

Now is it possible to make f1 fire and finish, THEN run myCallback()?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Provide a function reference as a parameter to the function you're calling.

function f1(fn) {

  // ...

  if (typeof fn === 'function') {    
    fn();
  }
}

// can be a defined function name or a variable holding a reference to a function
f1(myCallback);
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1  
And of course fn can also be an anonymous function. ==> f1(function() { ... }); –  Peter Ajtai Sep 30 '10 at 18:46
1  
@Peter also correct, thanks :D –  lincolnk Sep 30 '10 at 18:49
    
Only problem with this is that if you can't modify "f1", you're kind-of stuck. –  Pointy Sep 30 '10 at 21:10
    
@Pointy can't modify f1 how? –  lincolnk Sep 30 '10 at 21:19
    
Like if it's in a script file that you import from another website ... –  Pointy Sep 30 '10 at 21:27
f1();
myCallback();

… unless f1 is asynchronous, in which case f1 would have to be edited to accept a callback and run it when it is finished. Since there are multiple things that could make a function asynchronous, it isn't possible to give a simple "…and this is how" answer without a lot more detail.

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you right, well f1 is an ajax call so you have to wait for it to finish. i dont' have access to modify f1. –  Blankman Sep 30 '10 at 19:15
    
Then you are stuck. f1 is a black box which doesn't let you modify the bit you need to modify. –  Quentin Sep 30 '10 at 19:41
    
look at @pointy's response, it didn't (yet?) work but got my hopes up! –  Blankman Sep 30 '10 at 19:52
    
@pointy's response is, basically, a generic and reusable version of my code above. –  Quentin Sep 30 '10 at 19:58
function f1(param1, callback){
    // Do Work
    callback();
}

function myCallback(){
    // Do Callback Work
}

And then call f1 like:

f1(parameterValue, myCallback);
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if f1 is just a simple javascript-function it runs synchonous, so you just have to call myCallback after it/at the end of f1. if if does some crazy ajax-stuff (with jquery in your case), there you can set a callback on these ajax-things.

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You could create a facility to let you bind "onfinish" functions to any function:

function bindFollowup(f, followup) {
  return function() {
    f.apply(this, arguments);
    followup && followup();
  };
}

Then you can just define f1 and then write:

f1 = bindFollowup(f1, myCallback);
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nice, if htis works its perfect since I can't modify f1 at all. –  Blankman Sep 30 '10 at 19:13
    
followup && followup(), what is that doing? –  Blankman Sep 30 '10 at 19:20
    
Calling followup if you passed it in to the factory. –  Quentin Sep 30 '10 at 20:17
    
@Blankman it's just a check to make sure "followup" isn't null. It's kind-of lame and you'd probably want to make sure it's actually a function (in addition to not being null or undefined). –  Pointy Sep 30 '10 at 21:10
function f1(myCallBack)
{
// f1 activities 


myCallBack();
}
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4 spaces before a line formats as code. To do this with a block, select it and type ctr-k –  Peter Ajtai Sep 30 '10 at 18:44

lincolnk provided a great answer. It can be made much more flexible using the arguments array:

function f1() {
  var i;
  // ...
  for (i = 0; i < arguments.length; ++i)
  {
      if (typeof arguments[i] === 'function') 
      {
          arguments[i]();
      }      
  }

}

Like this, you can pass in as many callback functions as you want. They will be executed in the order passed in. No harm is done if the argument is not a callback.


Finally, you can preserve the context and arguments of f1 using apply().

Preserving the context could definitely be useful in many situations. I'm not sure about the arguments, but it is an option.

function f1() {
  var i;
  // ...
  for (i = 0; i < arguments.length; ++i)
  {
      if (typeof arguments[i] === 'function') 
      {
            // You can leave off 'arguments', but preserving 'this' will 
            //   often be useful.
          arguments[i].apply(this, arguments);
      }      
  }

}

the above allows you to do things like:

f1("alert me",function() {alert(arguments[0]);});
// Output when the call back is called: 
//    "alert me" 

jsFiddle example

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