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I'm having a hard time describing this problem. Maybe that's why I'm having a hard time finding a good solution (the words just aren't cooperating). Let me explain via code:

// original code
enum Fruit
{ 
    Apple,
    Orange,
    Banana,
}

...

Fruit fruit = acquireFruit();
if (fruit != Fruit.Orange && fruit != Fruit.Banana)
    coreFruit();
else
    pealFruit();
eatFruit();

Now pretend years of development go by with these three types. Different flavors of the above logic propagate throughout stored procedures, SSIS packages, windows apps, web apps, java apps, perl scripts and etc....

Finally:

// new code
enum Fruit
{ 
    Apple,
    Orange,
    Banana,
    Grape,
}

Most of the time, the "system" runs fine until Grapes are used. Then parts of the system act inappropriately, pealing and/or coring grapes when it's not needed or desired.

What kind of guidelines do you adhere to so these messes are avoided? My preference is for old code to throw an exception if it hasn't been refactored to consider new enumerations.

I've come up with a shot in the dark:

#1 Avoid "Not In Logic" such as this

// select fruit that needs to be cored
select Fruit from FruitBasket where FruitType not in(Orange, Banana)

#2 Use carefully constructed NotIn() methods when needed

internal static class EnumSafetyExtensions
{
    /* By adding enums to these methods, you certify that 1.) ALL the logic inside this assembly is aware of the
     * new enum value and 2.) ALL the new scenarios introduced with this new enum have been accounted for.
     * Adding new enums to an IsNot() method without without carefully examining every reference will result in failure. */

    public static bool IsNot(this SalesOrderType target, params SalesOrderType[] setb)
    {
        // SetA = known values - SetB

        List<SalesOrderType> seta = new List<SalesOrderType>
        {
            SalesOrderType.Allowance,
            SalesOrderType.NonAllowance,
            SalesOrderType.CompanyOrder,
            SalesOrderType.PersonalPurchase,
            SalesOrderType.Allotment,
        };
        setb.ForEach(o => seta.Remove(o));

        // if target is in SetA, target is not in SetB
        if (seta.Contains(target))
            return true;

        // if target is in SetB, target is not not in SetB
        if (setb.Contains(target))
            return false;
        // if the target is not in seta (the considered values minus the query values) and the target isn't in setb
        // (the query values), then we've got a problem.  We've encountered a value that this assembly does not support.

        throw new InvalidOperationException("Unconsidered Value detected: SalesOrderType." + target.ToString());
    }
}

Now, I can safely, use code like this:

bool needsCoring = fruit.IsNot(Fruit.Orange, Fruit.Banana);

If this code gets propagated throughout the system, exceptions will be thrown when the Grape comes rolling into town (qa will catch 'em all).

That's the plan anyway. The problem seems like it should be very common, but I can't seem to find anything on google (probably my own fault).

How are you all handling this?

UPDATE:

I feel the answer to this problem is create a "catch everything else" mechanism that halts processing and alerts testers and developers to that fact that the new enumeration needs consideration. "switch ... default" is great if you have it.

If C# didn't have switch ... default, we might right the above code like this:

Fruit fruit = acquireFruit();
if (fruit != Fruit.Orange && fruit != Fruit.Banana)
    coreFruit();
else if(fruit == Fruit.Apple)
    pealFruit();
else
    throw new NotSupportedException("Unknown Fruit:" + fruit)
eatFruit();

DISCLAIMER:

You really shouldn't use any of the above pseudo code. It may(?) compile or even work, but it's horrible code, really. I saw a lot of nice solutions in this thread if you're looking for an OOP-based approach. A good solution, of course, places all the switching and checking in a centralized method (a factory method is what strikes me). Peer code review on top of that will also be required.

share|improve this question
    
Nice question, although I have a feeling you may be missing something. Shouldn't NeedsCoring be a property on some Fruit object? –  Robert Harvey Sep 30 '10 at 18:49
1  
Agreed. In an OOP environment, using IFruit or FruitBase.NeedCoring() is the best way to go. Won't the factory methods that take the raw enum from the database, however, need some sort of protection so they throw exceptions when needed? Also, what about the non-OOP environments? stored procs, batch files, etc? I'm in search of rules, guidelines, best-practices that really span languages and OS's. Implementing each is probably each it's own topic. I used c# in my example because I'm currently using it. –  Robert H. Sep 30 '10 at 19:53
    
Thanks for the question, it's really a good one. –  Dan Abramov Sep 30 '10 at 20:13
    
Hmm... you said "Then parts of the system act inappropriately, peeling [...] grapes when it's not needed or desired". I think one should be able to say "peel me a grape", no? –  Jim Garrison Sep 30 '10 at 21:00

10 Answers 10

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If I understood your question correctly, the most common practice is to throw an NotSupportedException or NotImplementedException.

switch (fruit.Kind) {
case Fruit.Apple:
    Bite(fruit);
    break;
case Fruit.Banana:
    FeedToMonkey(fruit);
    break;
default: throw new NotSupportedException("Unknown fruit.");
}

As for adding new enum values which would break existing if-not-is logic, I believe using enum is a poor choice in this case. Your items clearly have a distinctively different behavior, they're not like e.g. colors. Perhaps it is best to make the options responsible for deciding how they should be treated. Then you should replace enums with polymorphism.

share|improve this answer
    
Our OOP environments are just wrappers for functional programming. As proof, you'll see this switch statement in most of the "fancy" solutions below (except the visitor pattern +1, which I really enjoyed). I think this concept is portable to non-OOP environments even if switch statements aren't available (ie: bool fruitPrepared +1). Thanks for all the help folks. –  Robert H. Oct 1 '10 at 18:45
    
+1 for default: throw. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 1 '10 at 19:20
    
@Robert: But if you have OOP (as is the case in C#), I'm a big fan of proper use of polymorphism/abstract interfaces, wrapping the dead data we get from other sources. Use em if you've got em :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 1 '10 at 19:25
    
@Robert: And, of course, you can roll your own OOP in any system where you have functions and instances, even if those instances are just enums. You can also roll your own switch-like behavior anywhere that you have else if, or dictionaries/hashes (associative containers) and function objects. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 1 '10 at 19:29
    
I think you mean structured programming. Functional programming is really, really a different thing. I wonder though why you're so determined to get rid of switch statement, I really see nothing wrong with using it when you do need to switch. –  Dan Abramov Oct 1 '10 at 19:49

I would use types, not enums, for the data structures... E.G. Create an interface IFruit that has the following:

interface IFruit
{
     bool NeedsCoring();
     void GetEaten(Person by);
     // etc.
}

And then I would just call the methods already there for determining whether it needs to be cored or whatnot.

share|improve this answer
6  
So all types of Fruit can eat Person s? –  arootbeer Sep 30 '10 at 20:08
    
Wow sorry I said that wrong...it should be void GetEaten(Person by); I was just using that as an example... –  Richard J. Ross III Sep 30 '10 at 21:09
    
I like this solution, but I think there are some design issues w/ this particular example. bool NeedsCoring() implies state, so any interface with that property should provide a void Core() method. Which brings us to the next problem, where all fruits aren't corable, so why should all fruits provide a bool NeedsCoring() property? –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 1 '10 at 19:07
1  
Also, what happens (maintenance-wise) when you need to provide additional properties, such as bool NeedsPeeling(); bool NeedsDeseeding(); bool NeedsDethorning(); bool NeedsChilling(); bool NeedsMicrowaving(); bool NeedsCutting();? Users of the class will have to add special handling for all these, and changes to the interface will break all already-implemented fruits. I think the best design will ignore the specifics of each fruit, and concentrate on what the user wants to do against all fruits, and that is to prepare them: bool IsPrepared { get; } void Prepare(); –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 1 '10 at 19:08

Most of the time, the "system" runs fine until Grapes are used. Then parts of the system act inappropriately, pealing and/or coring grapes when it's not needed or desired.

Seems to me like the problem is an introduction of a new data type. You might want to consider modeling your classes using a kind of visitor pattern, particularly since this pattern is intended for related objects with a fixed number of well-defined data types:

public abstract class Fruit {
    public abstract T Match(Func<Apple, T> f, Func<Banana, T> g, Func<Grape, T> h);

    public class Apple {
        // apple properties
        public override T Match(Func<Apple, T> f, Func<Banana, T> g, Func<Grape, T> h) {
            return f(this);
        }
    }
    public class Banana {
        // banana properties
        public override T Match(Func<Apple, T> f, Func<Banana, T> g, Func<Grape, T> h) {
            return g(this);
        }
    }
    public class Grape {
        // grape properties
        public override T Match(Func<Apple, T> f, Func<Banana, T> g, Func<Grape, T> h) {
            return h(this);
        }
    }
}

Usage:

public void EatFruit(Fruit fruit, Person p)
{
    // prepare fruit
    fruit.Match(
        apple => apple.Core(),
        banana => banana.Peel(),
        grape => { } // no steps required to prepare
        );

    p.Eat(fruit);
}

public FruitBasket PartitionFruits(List<Fruit> fruits)
{
    List<Apple> apples = new List<Apple>();
    List<Banana> bananas = new List<Banana>();
    List<Grape> grapes = new List<Grape>();

    foreach(Fruit fruit in fruits)
    {
        // partition by type, 100% type-safe on compile,
        // does not require a run-time type test
        fruit.Match(
            apple => apples.Add(apple),
            banana => bananas.Add(banana),
            grape => grapes.Add(grape));
    }

    return new FruitBasket(apples, bananas, grapes);
}

This style is advatageous for three reasons:

  • Future proofing: Lets say I add a Pineapple type and add it to my Match method: Match(..., Func<Pineapple, T> k);. Now I have a bunch of compilation errors, because all current usages of Match pass in 3 params, but we expect 4. The code doesn't compile until fix all usages of Match to handle your new type -- this makes it impossible to introduce a new type at the risk of not being handled in your code.

  • Type safety: The Match statement gives you access to specific properties of sub-types without a runtime type-test.

  • Refactorable: If you don't like delegates as shown above, or you have several dozen types and don't want to handle them all, its perfectly easy to wrap those delegates by a FruitVisitor class, so each subtype passes itself to the appropriate method it the FruitVisitor.

share|improve this answer
1  
The alternative to visitors is moving common methods into a base class. But, the OP seems to imply that his fruits don't share the same methods in common (ie: grapes and watermelons are unlikely to have a meaning Core() method) and works directly with subtypes more often than abstract base types. See this post for information regarding choosing between visitor pattern and simply overriding methods: stackoverflow.com/questions/2604169/… –  Juliet Sep 30 '10 at 19:58
    
+1. I like this syntax, because it makes it very clear that this is the logical equivalent of getting the compiler to statically check that all your switch statements are updated when a new type is added. I disagree that fruit passes the fixed number of well-defined data types check, so there may be better solutions for this particular example, but this is still a great alternative (once you know the pros/cons of the visitor pattern). –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 3 '10 at 1:41

This is a valid concern, and comes up most often when you're writing code against enums that are defined outside of your control, and which may evolve independently of your code. I'm referring to enums defined by the operating system or your execution environment, such as .NET itself. .NET (policy) explicitly allows enums to be extended across revisions of referenced assemblies, and this is not considered a breaking change.

One the the most common approaches is simply to write your code to throw an exception if it ever receives an enum it isn't prepared for. This is a simple solution, but it may be overkill depending on what you're using the enums for.

If you're using the enum to decide which of a fixed set of operations to perform, you don't have much choice but to throw if you encounter an unexpected enum.

However, if you're using the enum to decide if you should perform additional specialized operations on top of default behavior, then it's not necessarily the case that unexpected enums are the end of the world.

It's a judgment call that only you can make in the context of what your doing and in the context of what the enum actually represents. If you can write default behavior that you have high confidence should be acceptable for all enum cases, then maybe you can decide to accept future enum extensions without having to rewrite your code. This judgment call also requires evaluating your level of faith that the owner of the enum will extend the enum appropriately by not throwing completely unrelated stuff into the enum that requires completely different handling.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1. I would add that just because you get code to compile, and successfully run through the switch statement, doesn't mean your default case "did the right thing". Failing to do the right thing can mean lost hours or days of debugging, or bugs that never get fixed (since the code limps along in a bad state). This is why I prefer to throw an exception unless I'm very sure that any breaks I make will be localized and easy to find/debug. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 30 '10 at 19:27

While I don't have a ton of C# experience, were this Java, what I would instead do is create an interface IPeelable and another ICoreable, and have the fruit classes implement those. Then, instead of avoiding not logic, you could simply check to see if the fruit you've gotten implements either of the interfaces -- in this way, you can add future fruits which implement both peelable and coreable, like the muskmelon.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with this solution is that the user is still responsible for knowing that this difference exists, and to do tests for which type of fruit they're dealing with every time they want to call the Eat method. It doesn't solve the future problem of some sort of fruit that you have to, say, de-thorn. If you add a fruit like that, you have to change code in each place that users call Eat. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Sep 30 '10 at 19:21

You cannot hold two pieces of data in one data store. You need to store two pieces of data, and therefore an enum is the wrong data type for this. These should be instances of a Fruit class.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, there really is more data here than just the type of fruit. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 1 '10 at 19:31

A lot of people have good suggestions, but let me add one other that doesn't require a complete redesign of code or the support of objects/classes in places (like sql) that obviously have no support for such things.

You stated:

Fruit fruit = acquireFruit();
if (fruit != Fruit.Orange && fruit != Fruit.Banana)
    coreFruit();
else
    pealFruit();
eatFruit();

Which will absolutely break in unexpected ways if Grapes are introduced. I think a better approach would be:

Fruit fruit = acquireFruit();
Boolean fruitPrepared = false;

if (fruit == Fruit.Orange || fruit == Fruit.Banana) {
    pealFruit();
    fruitPrepared = true;
}

if (fruit == Fruit.Apple) {
    coreFruit();
    fruitPrepared = true;
}

if (!fruitPrepared) 
  throw new exception();

eatFruit();

A third approach is very similar:

Fruit fruit = acquireFruit();

switch(fruit) {
  case Fruit.Orange:
  case Fruit.Banana:
    pealFruit();
    break;    
  case Fruit.Apple:
    coreFruit();
    break;
  default:
    throw new exception('unknown fruit detected');
    break;
}

Each of the above breaks in well defined ways when you've gone outside of what you've explicitly coded for. The main thing to take away is that you are explicitly doing something for a known condition as opposed to defaulting to something on an unknown condition. There's probably a better way of phrasing that.

share|improve this answer

Use the social factor!

enum Fruit
{ 
    Apple,
    Orange,
    Banana,
    // add Grape here, and I'll shoot you
    // not kidding.
}

With me it would work (i.e. make me study the application's inner design deep enough not to introduce changes based on "lightweight" assumptions only) :))

share|improve this answer
    
+1: Design contracts are very important in programming. They are made much more usable by sufficient, but sparing, comments. This is a great example :) –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 1 '10 at 19:37
    
@Merlyn Morgan-Graham : Glad to hear from people who consider it important to write code in parts one is able to reason about too (I was just scared to mention the dreadful OCL (paperware), Eiffel-style approach (academic), or plain clear-enough comments (too old-style, no tool support), so only humor was left). As for the example, it would be much better (I think) just to group the enum's memebers into "// peelable" and "// non-peelable" groups (comments #1 and #2) and add an appropriate annotation like "calls 'peel(fruit)' if in 'peelable' group" to the function declaration. –  mlvljr Oct 2 '10 at 8:59
    
I haven't used compiled-in contracts before (pre-condition/post-condition stuff, like eiffel or spec sharp), unless you count abstract interfaces, so I can't comment :) As for documenting the enums, yeah it's a great idea. I think it is the right thing to do to document (via comments) not just your external API, but also your design caveats. But I think you shouldn't just rely on the comments when there is boilerplate involved, such as the proper implementation of the if peelable: peel/if seeded: deseed/if hasCore: decore. You should also provide a definitive implementation. –  Merlyn Morgan-Graham Oct 3 '10 at 1:18

You're asking the wrong questions. You're looking for coding work arounds for what is inadequate design. You want to add to your enumeration with minimum hassle.

I like your idea for using an enum for fruit types, but I'd have that as a field in a Fruit class.

I would use a class rather than an interface. You want to capture the concept of a fruit. It's a concrete thing. OTOH an interface would be good if you wanted to add the behavior or "quality" of being "fruitable". You want to have lots of different types of "Fruit" (a class), you are not adding "fruit-ability" (an interface) to an otherwise non-fruit thingy.

Rather than having a base "Fruit" class and sub-classing for every kind of fruit, just have an instance variable for the type - and make it an enumeration. Otherwise the number of sub-classes can get out of hand. Now every kind is a "Fruit". The "type" field tells us what kind.

Now that we have the fundamental idea of a Fruit class, add the peel/core idea as another field. If there are only these two choices maybe the field could be a boolean, "isPeelable". If there where, or could be in the future, other choices like "smash" or "pluck", now an enumeration might be a good idea, just like it is for the fruit type field. I suppose the class' instance field might be called "prepToEat"?

From here it gets interesting. Your design needs to be flexible to accommodate new fruit types. Also, it looks like you have a method for each "prepToEat" value. And we shall have none of that "exception coding" crap you describe in #1, #2 above.

Because each fruit has several dynamic parts we will create a factory class. This puts all the details for making all the different kinds - and more importantly, future code changes - into one class.

A KEY DESIGN ELEMENT is using a delegate for the "prepToEat" method. This again, prevents us from having to modify the Fruit class directly when we add fruits to our repitore.

  public class FruitEater
  {
     ArrayList<Fruit> myFruit;
     FruitFactory myFruitMaker;

     public FruitEater()
     {
        this.myFruit = new Arraylist();
        this.myFruitMaker = new FruitFactory();
     }

     public static void Main( args[] stuff )
     {
        myFruit.Add( myFruitMaker.Create( FruitType.Orange ));
        myFruit.Add( myFruitMaker.Create( FruitType.Apple ));

        foreach ( Fruit a in myFruit )
        {
           a.eat(); //FINALLY!!!!
        }
     }

  } //FruitEater class



  public class Fruit
  {
     public delegate void PrepareToEatDelegate();

     protected FruitType type;
     protected PrepType prepType;
     // pretend we have public properties to get each of these attributes


     // a field to hold what our delegate creates.
     private PrepareToEatDelegate prepMethod;

     // a method to set our delegate-created field
     public void PrepareToEatMethod( PrepareToEatDelegate clientMethod )
     {
        prepMethod = clientMethod;
     }

     public void Eat()
     {
        this.prepMethod();
        // do other fruit eating stuff
     }

      public Fruit(FruitType myType )
      {
        this.type = myType;
      }
  }

  public class FruitFactory
  {
     public FruitFactory() { }

     public Fruit Create( FruitType myType )
     {
        Fruit newFruit = new Fruit (myType);

        switch ( myType )
        {
           case FruitType.Orange :
              newFruit.prepType = PrepType.peel;
              newFruit.PrepareToEatMethod(new Fruit.PrepareToEatDelegate(FruitFactory.PrepareOrange));
              break;

           case FruitType.Apple :
              newFruit.prepType = PrepType.core;
              newFruit.PrepareToEatMethod( new Fruit.PrepareToEatDelegate( FruitFactory.PrepareApple ) );
              break;

           default :
              // throw an exception - we don't have that kind defined.
        }
        return newFruit;
     }// Create()

     // we need a prep method for each type of fruit this factory makes
     public static void PrepareOrange()
     {
        // whatever you do
     }

     public static void PrepareApple()
     {
        // apple stuff 
     }
  }// FruitFactory

  public enum FruitType
  {
     Orange
     ,Apple
     ,Grape
  }


  public enum PrepType
  {
     peel
     ,core
     ,pluck
     ,smash
  }
share|improve this answer

Generally speaking, conditional logic based on types (enumerated or regular) are going to break like this. When a new type is added, the compiler won't force you to update the switch.

For this example, instead of placing the majority of my logic in a switch, I would use polymorphism. I would pass the enum to a factory method/class, get back a fruit interface (or base fruit type), and execute virtual methods on the interface (/base type). I have to use a switch in the factory, because there is no other way to implement this that isn't logically identical. But because I return an abstract base class, I only have to do this switch in one place. I make sure to wash my hands afterwards :)

using System;

enum FruitType
{
    Apple,
    Banana,
    Pineapple,
}

interface IFruit
{
    void Prepare();
    void Eat();
}

class Apple : IFruit
{
    public void Prepare()
    {
        // Wash
    }

    public void Eat()
    {
        // Chew and swallow
    }
}

class Banana : IFruit
{
    public void Prepare()
    {
        // Peel
    }

    public void Eat()
    {
        // Feed to your dog?
    }
}

class Pineapple : IFruit
{
    public void Prepare()
    {
        // Core
        // Peel
    }

    public void Eat()
    {
        // Cut up first
        // Then, apply directly to the forehead!
    }
}

class FruitFactory
{
    public IFruit GetInstance(FruitType fruitType)
    {
        switch (fruitType)
        {
            case FruitType.Apple:
                return new Apple();
            case FruitType.Banana:
                return new Banana();
            case FruitType.Pineapple:
                return new Pineapple();
            default:
                throw new NotImplementedException(
                    string.Format("Fruit type not yet supported: {0}"
                        , fruitType
                    ));
        }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static FruitType AcquireFruit()
    {
        // Todo: Read this from somewhere.  A database or config file?
        return FruitType.Pineapple;
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var fruitFactory = new FruitFactory();
        FruitType fruitType = AcquireFruit();
        IFruit fruit = fruitFactory.GetInstance(fruitType);
        fruit.Prepare();
        fruit.Eat();
    }
}

The reason I went for a Prepare design, rather than a Core/Peel/Deseed/Dehusk/Chill/Cut design is that each fruit will need different preparation. With the design that separates preparation methods, you'll have to maintain all calling code (and possibly each implementation) each time you add a new class with different requirements. With the design that hides the specific preparation details, you can maintain each class separately, and adding new fruits doesn't break existing ones.

See this article for why my design is preferrable:

C++ FAQ Lite - Virtual Functions

share|improve this answer

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