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I have a complex hierarchy of nested objects, with all of the child objects (stored an array of objects in the parent class) containing a property linking back to their parent: fairly simple and straightforward, with no real problems. If I do a var_dump of any object in the hierarchy, I'll get a recursive reference in the dump, exactly as I'd expect.

FIRSTGEN 
   _children array of objects of type SECONDGEN
      SECONDGEN #1
         _parent object of type FIRSTGEN
         _children array of objects of type THIRDGEN
            THIRDGEN #1
               _parent object of type SECONDGEN
            THIRDGEN #2
               _parent object of type SECONDGEN
      SECONDGEN #2
         _parent object of type FIRSTGEN
         _children array of objects of type THIRDGEN
            THIRDGEN #3
               _parent object of type SECONDGEN

I've recently added some new elements to that hierarchy, and they don't follow quite the same pattern. They are stored in an array of objects in the top-level parent, but contain a property linking them back, not to their parent, but to a sibling. When I do a var_dump now, I get a "Fatal error: Nesting level too deep - recursive dependency?".

FIRSTGEN 
   _children_1 array of objects of type SECONDGEN_1
      SECONDGEN_1 #1
         _parent object of type FIRSTGEN
         _children array of objects of type THIRDGEN
            THIRDGEN #1
               _parent object of type SECONDGEN_1
            THIRDGEN #2
               _parent object of type SECONDGEN_1
      SECONDGEN_1 #2
         _parent object of type FIRSTGEN
         _children array of objects of type THIRDGEN
            THIRDGEN #3
               _parent object of type SECONDGEN_1
   _children_2 array of objects of type SECONDGEN_2
      SECONDGEN_2 #1
         _parent object of type SECONDGEN_1

Everything else within the code works correctly, with the exception of that var_dump(). I've tried creating a simpler example to demonstrate the problem, so that I could provide an example when asking this question; but haven't been able to replicate it in a short test, only within my more complex code.

I know that the solution is to refactor the relationship so that my _children_2 array of SECONDGEN_2 objects is held in the appropriate SECONDGEN_1 parent, making the parent relationship "correct"... I've already started doing this. However, I'm intrigued by the error, and wondered if anybody else had encountered it (and how you dealt with it yourself).

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1  
Some code would help, but if I were to guess, I would say you have infinite recursion (because I am a sibling of my sibling) –  NullUserException Sep 30 '10 at 21:01
    
I wish I could reproduce with a simple snippet of code that could be posted here, but so far I've not managed to replicate in 40 lines or less (I'm still trying to produce something); and even stripping everything extraneous from my main project (when I can reproduce it) it's still too many 100s of lines to post. –  Mark Baker Sep 30 '10 at 21:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Looks like a PHP limitation in self-referencing code and trying to display it with print_r, var_dump, var_export, or search through it with in_array. Basically there's no way for those functions to know where to stop recursing if an object is referenced cirularly.

According to this bug report the easiest way to reproduce this is:

$outText = var_export( $GLOBALS, true );
print_r($outText) ;

Other bug reports mention it too, with some more test cases. I'd say that if this is only triggered in var_dump you shouldn't worry too much about it. I definitely second Wrikken's suggestion about xdebug if this is for debugging purposes.

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The second bug report that you mention is a simple parent->child->parent recursion, which doesn't cause var_dump() any problems... it simply reports the recursion. It doesn't even cause issues with parent->child->grandchild->parent recursion. I was surprised at the sibling case though... from the successful handling of the more common types of recursion, I'd have expected the sibling relationship to be trapped in the same way. –  Mark Baker Sep 30 '10 at 21:22
1  
if it happens with var_export then in some cases, e.g. generating CSV, it makes impossible to debug existing variables, workaround was offered here php.net/manual/ru/function.var-export.php , search for keywords - WORKAROUND for error "Nesting level too deep - recursive dependency" –  Art Aug 15 at 14:53

This also arises if you compare recursive objects using == instead of ===

If you need to compare actual object instances always use the === operator as it only compares if the objects refer to the same instance of the same class.

Short explanation:

If you compare objects using $object == $objectToCompareWith, PHP is comparing every attribute and value of the first object with the second. This comparison is recursive over objects which are properties of the objects being compared.

That means that if both objects share an attribute with an object as its value, PHP does the same == comparison between those attribute objects. Now as soon as on of those attribute objects is recursive (e.g. a self referencing object) the comparison recurses down too until the maximum nesting level is reached.

Richard Lord: "Nesting level too deep – recursive dependency?"

PHP Manual: "Comparing Objects"

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flu - you're my hero of the day. So obvious once you read it... Thanks! –  kander Oct 1 '13 at 13:58
2  
Nice one! This also applies to in_array and comparing an array of objects. –  Zoop - Josh Jan 15 at 8:40

Sometimes (but seldom, as there are limited valid used for such contrustcs) this happens, and as long as your code works properly, I wouldn't give it much thought that a var_dump (a debugging tool, not a production one) cannot cope with it. However, if you still need var_dump to work, I can heartily recommend running xdebug, in which you can set max-depth the var_dump will show, the max-length of a string dump and the maximum amount of children.

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I think this is one of those cases where there's my reason for the sibling relationship (to provide a method to list all SECONDGEN_2 children directly from the FIRSTGEN parent) can be done as easily by attaching SECONDGEN_2 children to their corresponding SECONDGEN_1 object, and for the FIRSTGEN method to loop through the SECONDGEN_1 objects calling a listSECONDGEN_2 method there and merging the lists; so not really a valid use. So I'm reworking it anyway. –  Mark Baker Sep 30 '10 at 21:27
    
I'm having a hard time visualizing the actual structure of references, but it could always be that in a sufficient sample, there is a path for PHP to hop nodes without encountering the same node before it's maximum nesting level. How many nodes do you have, and is there such a path? –  Wrikken Sep 30 '10 at 23:41

You could use the magic method __toString to define a custom conversion to a string. Look through your object and avoid going too deep through recursions when implementing __toString and everything should be fine. Just never forget and accidentally call var_dump, var_export, print_r etc.

Once the __toString method has been defined the following works nicely:

echo $yourObjectHere;

This is my current solution which works well, but I would still like something to protect me from forgetting not to call var_dump, var_export and print_r.

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