Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Can anybody show me how to escape double quote inside a double string in bash?

For example in my shell script

#!/bin/bash

dbload="load data local infile \"'gfpoint.csv'\" into table $dbtable FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' ENCLOSED BY '\"' LINES TERMINATED BY \"'\n'\" IGNORE 1 LINES"

I can't get the ENCLOSED BY \" with double quote escape correctly. I can't use single quote for my variable because i want to use variable $dbtable.

share|improve this question
19  
You should familiarize yourself with the concept of sql injection before you start writing code like this. –  Daenyth Sep 30 '10 at 21:10
    
Also see mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/050 –  Charles Duffy Nov 13 '13 at 13:38
    
possible duplicate of Escaping single-quotes within single-quoted strings –  kenorb Feb 28 at 20:50

4 Answers 4

Use a backslash:

echo "\""     # Prints one " character.
share|improve this answer
    
Not working. x=ls; if [ -f "$(which "\""$x"\"")" ]; then echo exists; else echo broken; fi; gives broken whereas ... [ -f "$(which $x)" ]; ... or ... [ -f $(which "$x") ]; ... work just fine. Issues would arise when either $x or the result of $(which "$x") gives anything with a space or other special character. A workaround is using a variable to hold the result of which, but is bash really incapable of escaping a quote or am I doing something wrong? –  Luc Jul 27 at 15:10

Simple example of escaping quotes in shell:

$ echo 'abc'\''abc'
abc'abc
$ echo "abc"\""abc"
abc"abc

It's done by finishing already opened one ('), placing escaped one (\'), then opening another one (').

Alternatively:

$ echo 'abc'"'"'abc'
abc'abc
$ echo "abc"'"'"abc"
abc"abc

It's done by finishing already opened one ('), placing quote in another quote ("'"), then opening another one (').

More examples: Escaping single-quotes within single-quoted strings

share|improve this answer

check out printf...

#!/bin/bash
mystr="say \"hi\""

Without using printf

echo -e $mystr

output: say "hi"

Using printf

echo -e $(printf '%q' $mystr)

output: say \"hi\"

share|improve this answer
    
Note that printf escapes more characters as well, such as ', ( and ) –  David Pärsson May 10 '13 at 10:14
    
printf %q generates strings ready for eval, not formatted for echo -e. –  Charles Duffy Nov 13 '13 at 13:38

Bash allows you to place strings adjacently, and they'll just end up being glued together.

So this:

$ echo "Hello"', world!'

produces

Hello, world!

The trick is to alternate between single and double-quoted strings as required. Unfortunately, it quickly gets very messy. For example:

$ echo "I like to use" '"double quotes"' "sometimes"

produces

I like to use "double quotes" sometimes

In your example, I would do it something like this:

$ dbtable=example
$ dbload='load data local infile "'"'gfpoint.csv'"'" into '"table $dbtable FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' ENCLOSED BY '"'"'"' LINES "'TERMINATED BY "'"'\n'"'" IGNORE 1 LINES'
$ echo $dbload

which produces the following output:

load data local infile "'gfpoint.csv'" into table example FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' ENCLOSED BY '"' LINES TERMINATED BY "'\n'" IGNORE 1 LINES

It's difficult to see what's going on here, but I can annotate it using Unicode quotes. The following won't work in bash – it's just for illustration:

dbload=load data local infile "’“'gfpoint.csv'”‘" into’“table $dbtable FIELDS TERMINATED BY ',' ENCLOSED BY '”‘"’“' LINES”‘TERMINATED BY "’“'\n'”‘" IGNORE 1 LINES

The quotes like “ ‘ ’ ” in the above will be interpreted by bash. The quotes like " ' will end up in the resulting variable.

If I give the same treatment to the earlier example, it looks like this:

$ echoI like to use"double quotes"sometimes

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.