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I have a Perl hash whose keys start with, or are, numbers.

If I use,

foreach my $key (sort keys %hash) {
    print $hash{$key} . "\n";
}

the list might come out as,

0
0001
1000
203
23

Instead of

0
0001
23
203
1000
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2  
Shouldn't it be print $key to list the keys? –  DBMarcos99 Aug 15 '09 at 8:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 29 down vote accepted
foreach my $key (sort { $a <=> $b} keys %hash) {
    print $hash{$key} . "\n";
}

The sort operation takes an optional comparison "subroutine" (either as a block of code, as I've done here, or the name of a subroutine). I've supplied an in-line comparison that treats the keys as numbers using the built-in numeric comparison operator '<=>'.

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To clarify a bit: the keys in your case are strings, and are sorted as strings. <=> operator interprets its arguments as numbers, converting strings to numbers as needed. This is the sense of much of perl's oddness: operators, rather than variables, are typed in perl. –  Arkadiy Dec 20 '08 at 18:26
1  
It's context rather than type. <=> evaluates it's operands in numeric context, while the default sort operator (cmp) evaluates them in scalar (i.e. string) context. –  kixx Dec 20 '08 at 21:15
1  
@kixx: Numbers are scalars too. A scalar is a single value, regardless of type. That is, numbers, strings, even references are scalars, while lists and hashes are not. "Scalar context" has little to nothing to do with this. –  cHao Oct 27 '11 at 11:26

Paul's answer is correct for numbers, but if you want to take it a step further and sort mixed words and numbers like a human would, neither cmp nor <=> will do. For example...

  9x
  14
  foo
  fooa
  foolio
  Foolio
  foo12
  foo12a
  Foo12a
  foo12z
  foo13a

Sort::Naturally takes care of this problem providing the nsort and ncmp routines.

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