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The built-in Math.Pow() function in .NET raises a double base to a double exponent and returns a double result.

What's the best way to do the same with integers?

Added: It seems that one can just cast Math.Pow() result to (int), but will this always produce the correct number and no rounding errors?

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1  
As written elsewhere, since 2010 (.NET 4.0) there is BigInteger.Pow method which does integer exponentiation (needs assembly reference to System.Numerics.dll). –  Jeppe Stig Nielsen Feb 13 '14 at 7:41

8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Using the math in John Cook's blog link,

    public static long IntPower(int x, short power)
    {
        if (power == 0) return 1;
        if (power == 1) return x;
        // ----------------------
        int n = 15;
        while ((power <<= 1) >= 0) n--;

        long tmp = x;
        while (--n > 0)
            tmp = tmp * tmp * 
                 (((power <<= 1) < 0)? x : 1);
        return tmp;
    }
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Make sure if you use this to not modify it at all. I thought I'd get around using a short to avoid casting anything, but the algorithm doesn't work if it's not. I prefer the more straightforward if less performant method by Vilx –  obsidian Nov 18 '11 at 1:00
    
obsidian, You may be able to use an int if you change the 15 in the algorithm to a 31 –  Charles Bretana Jan 7 '12 at 23:20
    
I did a brief benchmark and as I suspected, Vilx's method is more efficient if you need int-length powers (approximately 6 times faster). Perhaps someone else can verify this result? –  ioquatix Nov 23 '12 at 11:03

A pretty fast one might be something like this:

int IntPow(int x, uint pow)
{
    int ret = 1;
    while ( pow != 0 )
    {
        if ( (pow & 1) == 1 )
            ret *= x;
        x *= x;
        pow >>= 1;
    }
    return ret;
}

Note that this does not allow negative powers. I'll leave that as an exercise to you. :)

Added: Oh yes, almost forgot - also add overflow/underflow checking, or you might be in for a few nasty surprises down the road.

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that's great for a large exponent –  orip Dec 20 '08 at 18:53
1  
Why do you need explicit overflow checking? Won't the built-in C# overflow checking apply just fine? (Assuming you pass /checked) –  Jay Bazuzi Dec 20 '08 at 21:06
    
The algorithmic name for this is exponentiation by repeated squaring. Essentially, we repeatedly double x, and if pow has a 1 bit at that position, we multiply/accumulate that into the return value. –  ioquatix Nov 23 '12 at 10:49
    
Using .NET 4's BigInteger makes for really big integer powers –  boost Aug 9 '13 at 6:21
1  
@boost BigInteger has powering built in though –  harold Oct 4 '13 at 8:45

LINQ anyone?

public static int Pow(this int bas, int exp)
{
    return Enumerable
          .Repeat(bas, exp)
          .Aggregate(1, (a, b) => a * b);
}

usage as extension:

var threeToThePowerOfNine = 3.Pow(9);
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4  
This is the most hilarious answer I've seen today - congratulations on making it work as expected :D –  ioquatix Nov 23 '12 at 9:37

Here's a blog post that explains the fastest way to raise integers to integer powers. As one of the comments points out, some of these tricks are built into chips.

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Use double version, check for overflow (over max int or max long) and cast to int or long?

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How do I know this won't produce incorrect results due to rounding errors? –  romkyns Dec 20 '08 at 20:27
    
Add 0.5 before converting to int to take care of rounding, as long as the precision of double is greater than that of int or long. –  Mark Ransom Dec 20 '08 at 21:53
    
Doubles can represent all integers exactly up to 2^53, so this sounds like it will always work. –  romkyns Dec 21 '08 at 8:15
    
Unless you're using 64-bit integers. –  dan04 May 1 '10 at 5:01

lolz, how about:

public static long IntPow(long a, long b)
{
  long result = 1;
  for (long i = 0; i < b; i++)
    result *= a;
  return result;
}
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If you want to indicate which answer is the best, just upvote that answer instead of downvoting all other answers. A +1 against that -1. –  C.Evenhuis Apr 17 '12 at 10:52

My favorite solution to this problem is a classic divide and conquer recursive solution. It is actually faster then multiplying n times as it reduces the number of multiplies in half each time.

public static int Power(int x, int n)
{
  // Basis
  if (n == 0)
    return 1;
  else if (n == 1)
    return x;

  // Induction
  else if (n % 2 == 1)
    return x * Power(x*x, n/2);
  return Power(x*x, n/2);
}

Note: this doesn't check for overflow or negative n.

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2  
This is the same algorithm as Vilx-, except it uses much more space (the recursive call is not a tail call). –  Ben Voigt Jun 25 '12 at 21:06

Two more...

    public static int FastPower(int x, int pow)
    {
        switch (pow)
        {
            case 0: return 1;
            case 1: return x;
            case 2: return x * x;
            case 3: return x * x * x;
            case 4: return x * x * x * x;
            case 5: return x * x * x * x * x;
            case 6: return x * x * x * x * x * x;
            case 7: return x * x * x * x * x * x * x;
            case 8: return x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x;
            case 9: return x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x;
            case 10: return x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x; 
            case 11: return x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x * x; 
            // up to 32 can be added 
            default: // Vilx's solution is used for default
                int ret = 1;
                while (pow != 0)
                {
                    if ((pow & 1) == 1)
                        ret *= x;
                    x *= x;
                    pow >>= 1;
                }
                return ret;
        }
    }

    public static int SimplePower(int x, int pow)
    {
        return (int)Math.Pow(x, pow);
    }

I did some quick performance testing


  • mini-me : 32 ms

  • Sunsetquest(Fast) : 37 ms

  • Vilx : 46 ms

  • Charles Bretana(aka Cook's): 166 ms

  • Sunsetquest(simple) : 469 ms

  • 3dGrabber (Linq version) : 868 ms

(testing notes: intel i7 2nd gen, .net 4, release build, release run, 1M different bases, exp from 0-10 only)

Conclusion: mini-me's is the best in both performance and simplicity

very minimal accuracy testing was done

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1  
mini-me's performance would only hold for smaller powers. But I'm definitely using your code to help solve Problem 43: projecteuler.net/problem=43 –  turiyag Dec 28 '14 at 12:49

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