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I have this code from MSDN that allows only numeric characters into a TextBox. But I can't modify it to accept a "." as an input and limit to one.

Ex: 12.50     valid!
    236.3247  valid!  
    2..5      invalid
    //other non-numeric input invalid

Considering the code below:

private bool nonNumberEntered = false;

private void textBox1_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    nonNumberEntered = false;

    if (e.KeyCode < Keys.D0 || e.KeyCode > Keys.D9)
    {
        if (e.KeyCode < Keys.NumPad0 || e.KeyCode > Keys.NumPad9)
        {
            if (e.KeyCode != Keys.Back)
            {
                nonNumberEntered = true;
            }
        }
    }
    if (Control.ModifierKeys == Keys.Shift)
    {
        nonNumberEntered = true;
    }
}

private void textBox1_KeyPress(object sender, KeyPressEventArgs e)
{
    if (nonNumberEntered == true)
    {
        e.Handled = true;
    }
}

Kindly post your modified code. Thanks a lot.

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I think it would be a lot easier to simply validate the expected string using a regular expression, rather than trying to hand-code a scanner of this sort. –  Kirk Woll Oct 1 '10 at 2:27
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2 Answers

I have a textbox that I only want digits and commas in, so it's similar to what you have.

I'd just run a regex on textbox.Text to match digits and zero or one decimal points with each key press. If the string that would be created doesn't match, then just disallow that character.

I think a .NET example is "^\d*.?\d*$"

From left to right:

  • ^ at the beginning of the string
  • \d* zero or more digits
  • .? zero or one period
  • \d* zero or more digits
  • $ end of string

Not exactly what you have above but that would work.

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I don't understand regex... :( –  yonan2236 Oct 1 '10 at 2:31
    
@yonan2236, well, then use Scott's solution. –  Kirk Woll Oct 1 '10 at 2:38
    
Included a regex at might work. More here: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/az24scfc%28v=VS.71%29.aspx –  John Oct 1 '10 at 4:11
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I would just validate the field as a Culture-sensitive number after they tab off or on a form submit. It's not really necessary or valuable to actually stop them from pressing . twice in the field. Often I find that kind of thing annoying, because I'm modifying what was there and I just haven't finished...

Use double.TryParse to test it properly.

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