Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a socket client for interacting with a network service. Currently because I want to support async reading and writing I am threading both the output stream and the input stream of one socket, but I was wondering if there is a better way to do this. I have taken a look at Java NIO and was not very impressed, and I also looked at Mina, but was wondering if anyone had any better ideas.

Thanks.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

The technique I used for asynchronous communication was to use an ExecutorService. In my example below, the service would execute a FutureTask that would wait for the next line. In the meantime, the server could continue executing other tasks and periodically poll the reader to see if a result was received yet.

For writing you could implement a similar FutureTask.

Note: You need not extend the functionality of an existing Stream/Reader/Writer like I did. This was just the source code that I had handy

 public class SocketStringReader extends BufferedReader {
    /**
     * Internal buffer used for asynchronous reads
     */
    private HashMap<String, String> buf = null;
    /**
     * Waiting status used for asynchronous reads
     */
    private boolean waiting = false;
    /**
     * Shared ExecutorService for asynchronous reads
     */
    private static ExecutorService executor = Executors.newCachedThreadPool();

    /**
     * Constructor here to pacify Java
     * @param in The InputStream to be used as the underlying stream
     */
    public SocketStringReader(InputStream in) {
        super(new InputStreamReader(in));
    }

    @Override
    public HashMap<String, String> readHashMap() throws IOException,
    ClassNotFoundException {
        if (buf != null) {
            HashMap<String, String> resp = new HashMap<String, String>(buf);
            buf = null;
            return resp;
        }
        return stringToHashMap(this.readLine());
    }

    /**
     * Parses a string and converts it to a HashMap
     * @param map A String object of the format "{key=value, key=value, ...}" 
     * that is parsed into a HashMap
     * @return The parsed HashMap
     */
    public static HashMap<String, String> stringToHashMap(String map) {
        // take the string apart
        String[] split = map.split("[={},]");
        HashMap<String, String> result = new HashMap<String, String>();
        for (int i = 1; i < split.length; i += 2) {
            result.put(split[i].trim(), split[i + 1].trim());
        }
        logger.debug("new incoming HashMap: " + result.toString());
        return result;
    }

    /**
     * Returns the availability of the input stream
     * @return The number HashMap objects in the internal buffer
     */
    public int getAvailable() throws IOException {
        return (buf == null) ? 0 : 1;
    }

    @Override
    public HashMap<String, String> readHashMapAsync() throws IOException,
            ClassNotFoundException {
        //Check internal buffer
        if (buf != null) {
            HashMap<String, String> temp = new HashMap<String, String>(buf);
            buf = null;
            return temp;
        } else {
            //Do future crap? or nothing perhaps...
            if (!waiting) {
                waiting = true;
                FutureTask<HashMap<String, String>> future = new FutureTask<HashMap<String, String>>(
                        new Callable<HashMap<String, String>>() {
                            @Override
                            public HashMap<String, String> call() throws Exception {
                                buf = stringToHashMap(readLine());
                                logger.debug("Read object with sessionid: " + buf.get("sessionid"));
                                waiting = false;
                                return null;
                            }
                        });
                executor.execute(future);
            }
        }
        return null;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Apart from Mina and NIO there are a couple of other libraries (all generally built on top of NIO)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.