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hey guys, wonder what i'm doing wrong?

javascript:document.getElementsByTagName('textarea').innerHTML='inserted';

i want to create a bookmarklet to insert simple text to a textarea on a given webpage.

regards matt

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Use the value property rather than innerHTML and make sure your code evaluates to undefined, which you can do by wrapping it in a function with no return statement. If you don't do this, the contents of the page will be replaced with whatever your code evaluates to (in this case, the string 'inserted').

javascript:(function() {document.getElementsByTagName('textarea')[0].value = 'inserted';})();

Update 14 January 2012

I failed to spot the fact that the original code was treating document.getElementsByTagName('textarea') as a single element rather than the NodeList it is, so I've updated my code with [0]. @streetpc's answer explains this in more detail.

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Downvoter: I imagine you downvoted this because I missed the fact that the original code was treating document.getElementsByTagName('textarea') as a single element. That's fair enough, but leaving a comment to say so would have been helpful. –  Tim Down Jan 14 '12 at 11:57
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Unlinke getElementById, getElementsByTagName has an sat Elements because it returns an array array-like NodeList of the matching elements. So you'll have to access one of the elements first, let's say the first one for simplicity:

javascript:void((function(){document.getElementsByTagName('textarea')[0].value='inserted'})())

Also, as mentioned by others, value property rather than innerHTML here.

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Actually getElementsByTagName() returns an array-like NodeList rather than an array, but your point is correct. –  Tim Down Jan 14 '12 at 12:00
    
Thanks, fixed that –  instanceof me Jan 20 '12 at 15:18
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In case anyone wonders how to use the currently focused text field, use the following:

document.activeElement.value = "...";
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In jQuery you have to use if this way:

for single element -> $('#element_id').html('your html here')
for all text areas -> $('textarea').val('your html here')

I have to confess that I`m not sure why it works this way but it works. And use rameworks, they will save you time and nerves.

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Is it possible to use jQuery in bookmarklet? –  Antonio Jul 16 '13 at 14:51
    
@Antonio yes, you can load any scripts by appending script tags to the document. e.g. benalman.com/projects/run-jquery-code-bookmarklet –  meleyal Mar 28 at 15:46
    
@meleyal, Ithink it's quite risky: there could be a conflict of jQuery versions in case jQuery is already used in the page –  Antonio Mar 28 at 20:19
1  
@Antonio you could always run with .noConflict(): api.jquery.com/jQuery.noConflict –  meleyal Apr 9 at 12:13
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