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I tried to use the read/write file descriptor in bash so that I could delete the file that the file descriptor referred to afterward, as such:

F=$(mktemp)
exec 3<> "$F"
rm -f "$F"

echo "Hello world" >&3
cat <&3

but the cat command gives no output. I can achieve what I want if I use separate file descriptors for reading and writing:

F=$(mktemp)
exec 3> "$F"
exec 4< "$F"
rm -f "$F"

echo "Hello world" >&3
cat <&4

which prints Hello world.

I suspected that bash doesn't automatically seek to the start of the file descriptor when you switch from writing to reading it, and the following combination of bash and python code confirms this:

fdrw.sh

exec 3<> tmp
rm tmp

echo "Hello world" >&3
exec python fdrw.py

fdrw.py

import os  

f = os.fdopen(3)
print f.tell()
print f.read()

which gives:

$ bash fdrw.sh
12

$ # This is the prompt reappearing

Is there a way to achieve what I want just using bash?

share|improve this question
    
why would you want to delete the file before reading/writing? –  unhammer Mar 21 '11 at 10:20
4  
In Unix, when you remove a file, the file isn't actually deleted until all open file descriptors to it are closed. Thus, deleting a temporary file right after opening is common practice, since it guarantees that no other process can maliciously alter the file and that the file is closed after your process closes the file or exits. –  telotortium Mar 21 '11 at 20:16
    
Why don't you like your own method of having separate read and write descriptors? That seems like the simplest way. –  Kelvin May 14 '12 at 16:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No. bash does not have any concept of "seeking" with its redirection. It reads/writes (mostly) from beginning to end in one long stream.

share|improve this answer
1  
Basically, then, the only reason for read/write descriptors in bash is to pass them to an exec'ed process? –  telotortium Oct 1 '10 at 10:59
    
In order to provide more channels than just stdin, stdout, and sterr, yes. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 1 '10 at 11:37

If you ever do happen to want to seek on bash file descriptors, you can use a subprocess, since it inherits the file descriptors of the parent process. Here is an example C program to do this.

seekfd.c

#define _FILE_OFFSET_BITS 64
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <unistd.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    /* Arguments: fd [offset [whence]]
     * where
     * fd: file descriptor to seek
     * offset: number of bytes from position specified in whence
     * whence: one of
     *  SEEK_SET (==0): from start of file
     *  SEEK_CUR (==1): from current position
     *  SEEK_END (==2): from end of file
     */
    int fd;
    long long scan_offset = 0;
    off_t offset = 0;
    int whence = SEEK_SET;
    int errsv; int rv;
    if (argc == 1) {
        fprintf(stderr, "usage: seekfd fd [offset [whence]]\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    if (argc >= 2) {
        if (sscanf(argv[1], "%d", &fd) == EOF) {
            errsv = errno;
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: %s\n", argv[0], strerror(errsv));
            exit(1);
        }
    }
    if (argc >= 3) {
        rv = sscanf(argv[2], "%lld", &scan_offset);
        if (rv == EOF) {
            errsv = errno;
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: %s\n", argv[0], strerror(errsv));
            exit(1);
        }
        offset = (off_t) scan_offset;
    }
    if (argc >= 4) {
        if (sscanf(argv[3], "%d", &whence) == EOF) {
            errsv = errno;
            fprintf(stderr, "%s: %s\n", argv[0], strerror(errsv));
            exit(1);
        }
    }

    if (lseek(fd, offset, whence) == (off_t) -1) {
        errsv = errno;
        fprintf(stderr, "%s: %s\n", argv[0], strerror(errsv));
        exit(2);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Try changing the sequence of commands:

F=$(mktemp tmp.XXXXXX)
exec 3<> "$F"
echo "Hello world" > "$F"
rm -f "$F"

#echo "Hello world" >&3
cat <&3
share|improve this answer
    
So write to the file, then delete it, then read from it? –  Dennis Williamson Oct 1 '10 at 14:14
4  
@Dennis this solution actually works. The cat isn't reading from the apparently deleted file. It's reading from the descriptor that's still open. You can still access a file's contents with that descriptor, even though the last (hard) link to it has been removed. –  Kelvin May 14 '12 at 16:44

I found a way to do it in bash, but it's relying on an obscure feature of exec < /dev/stdin which actually can rewind the file descriptor of stdin according to http://www.madisonlinux.org/pipermail/madlug/2006-February/012896.html:

F=$(mktemp)
exec 3<> "$F"
rm -f "$F"

echo "Hello world" >&3
{ exec < /dev/stdin; cat; } <&3

The write descriptor isn't affected by that so you can still append output to descriptor 3 before the cat.

Sadly I only got this working under Linux not under MacOS (BSD), even with the newest bash version. So it doesn't seem very portable.

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