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How can I get a value from particular number?

Lets say number is 20040819. I want to get last two digit i.e 19 using Perl.

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1  
Your number looks like a date (Aug 19, 2004) from which you are extracting the day of month. –  dolmen Oct 1 '10 at 15:52
1  
Perhaps you should use a DateTime library (like, say, DateTime) instead of manually parsing date strings. –  Ether Oct 1 '10 at 16:22

8 Answers 8

my $x = 20040819;
print $x % 100, "\n";
print substr($x, -2);
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3  
The % option is the most natural in my opinion. –  Nathan Fellman Oct 1 '10 at 11:27
1  
I find the substr more explicit. –  Daenyth Oct 1 '10 at 16:22
2  
I'd go with the substr. –  brian d foy Oct 1 '10 at 18:01
    
I would also go with the substr command, personally. –  Platinum Azure Oct 1 '10 at 18:18

Benoit's answer is on the mark and one I would use, but in order to do this with a pattern search as you suggested in your title, you would do:

my $x = 20040819;
if ($x =~ /\d*(\d{2})/)
{
    $lastTwo = $1;
}
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Another option:

my $x = 20040819;
$x =~ /(\d{2})\b/;
my $last_two_digits = $1;

the \b matches a word boundary.

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Have you heard about Unicode? \d matches more than just ASCII digits ([0-9]): indian digits and others... –  dolmen Oct 1 '10 at 15:54
    
Maybe we'll get the /a flag in Perl 5.14 though :) –  brian d foy Oct 1 '10 at 18:00
my $num = 20040819;
my $i = 0;
if ($num =~ m/([0-9]{2})$/) {
    $i = $1;
}
print $i;
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Yet another solution:

my $number = '20040819';
my @digits = split //, $number;
print join('', splice @digits, -2, 2);
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This soluting gives an list containing two one-character strings: ('1', '9'). –  dolmen Oct 1 '10 at 15:57
    
Fixed using join, though I wonder if he meant to use substr? –  Platinum Azure Oct 1 '10 at 16:05
substr("20040819", -2); 

or you can use Regexp::Common::time - Date and time regular expressions like

use strict;
use Regexp::Common qw(time);


my $str = '20040819' ;

if ($str =~ $RE{time}{YMD}{-keep})
{
  my $day = $4; # output 19

  #$1 the entire match

  #$2 the year

  #$3 the month

  #$4 the day
}
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I'm just going to go beyond and show how to extract a YYYYMMDD format date into a year, month, and date:

my $str = '20040819';
my ($year, $month, $date) = $str =~ /^(\d{4})(\d{2})(\d{2})$/;

You can check for defined $year, etc., to figure out if the match worked or not.

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Solution for you:

my $number = 20040819;
my ($pick) = $number =~ m/(\d{2})$/;
print "$pick\n";
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