Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a struct with a callback function, the callback function needs a pointer to the structure in order to do its operation. How do I properly define these elements such that is will compile without warnings?

typedef struct {

    // some fields required for processing...

    int (*doAction)(struct pr_PendingResponseItem *pr);
} pr_PendingResponseItem;

If I remove the "struct" attribute on the pr parameter, I get an error. If I leave it in, I get a warning: "its scope is only this definition or declaration, which is probably not what you want"

It all works, but I would like to know the proper way to define such a structure.

Also related, is defining a self referential structure:

typedef struct LinkedItem_ {
    LinkedItem_ * prev;
    LinkedItem_ * next;
    void * data;
} LinkedItem;

(I think this is correct, but additional thoughts are welcome if it is related to the question.)

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

Your function pointer references a struct pr_PendingResponseItem, but you haven't declared a struct pr_PendingResponseItem. You just have an unnamed structure typedef'ed to the name pr_PendingResponseItem (and that name isn't established yet).

Give the struct a name:

struct pr_PendingResponseItem {

    // some fields required for processing...

    int (*doAction)(struct pr_PendingResponseItem *pr);
} ;
typedef struct pr_PendingResponseItem pr_PendingResponseItem;
share|improve this answer

There are two ways to do it — for both your example structures. They are essentially isomorphic.

  1. Use a structure tag, as already shown in various other answers.

    typedef struct pr_PendingResponseItem
    {
        // some fields required for processing...
        int (*doAction)(struct pr_PendingResponseItem *pr);
    } pr_PendingResponseItem;
    
    typedef struct LinkedItem
    {
        struct LinkedItem *prev;
        struct LinkedItem *next;
        void * data;
    } LinkedItem;
    
  2. Use typedef to give a name to an incomplete structure type and use the typedef in the structure definition.

    typedef struct pr_PendingResponseItem pr_PendingResponseItem;
    struct pr_PendingResponseItem
    {
        // some fields required for processing...
        int (*doAction)(pr_PendingResponseItem *pr);
    };
    
    typedef struct LinkedItem LinkedItem;
    struct LinkedItem
    {
        LinkedItem *prev;
        LinkedItem *next;
        void * data;
    };
    

Note that the structure tags are in a different namespace from the typedef names, so there is no need to use different names for the typedef and structure tag. Also note that in C++ the typedef would be unnecessary.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is the only answer that actually identified that you could forward declare the typedef. –  Matt Joiner Oct 1 '10 at 16:06

something like this

typedef struct _pr_PendingResponseItem_ {

    // some fields required for processing...

    int (*doAction)(struct _pr_PendingResponseItem_ *pr);
} pr_PendingResponseItem;

should fix it.

(Tested & works)

share|improve this answer

Adding to the answer by nos above.

The key insight here is that when dealing with a declaration like "typedef struct name1 {} name2;", you are actually declaring two types i.e. "struct name1 {};" and then "typedef struct name1 name2;", where "struct name1" is a type and you have to use the syntax "struct name1" to refer to it, and "name2" is a type, and you refer to it as "name2". You are allowed to leave "name1" out, in which case you just define the second type and the first one remains a anonymous struct.

Now, in the first case, if you want to refer to the type "struct pr_PendingResponseItem", you need to declare that type, instead of the anonymous struct you have declared. So, change your struct declaration to "struct pr_PendingResponseItem".

In the second case, you are trying to refer to a struct type as a forward reference (i.e. referring to it before its definition is complete), which is allowed, but to refer to a struct type, the required syntax is "struct name". So you need to replace forward references to "LinkedItem_" in your definition with "struct LinkedItem_".

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.