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I have an <input> field in my web page, and I want to add a particular method on it, let say fooBar().

Here is what I do:

<input id="xxx" .../>
<script type="text/javascript">
    $("xxx").fooBar = function() { ... };
</script>

This works well. However, for some reasons I will not detail here (in fact the HTML is generated by JSF components), the <script> will be declared before the <input> tag.

So in others words, I will have that in my HTML:

<script type="text/javascript">
    $("xxx").fooBar = function() { ... };
</script>
<input id="xxx" .../>

So of course this code will not work correctly, as the script will try to get ($("xxx")) and modify an element that does not exist yet.

If I want to stick on the exact order of these two tags, what is the best way to accomplish what I want?

Edit

In my case, $ refers to prototype, but I am also using jQuery in my application. And I must be compatible with IE6 :o(

share|improve this question
    
$ is what in your example? Prototype? jQuery? –  Tomalak Oct 1 '10 at 12:15
    
Yes, sorry, I've edited my question for that. I use both of them, but here, $ refers to Prototype. –  romaintaz Oct 1 '10 at 12:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to run your script after the document is loaded. With jQuery you'd do that with:

$(document).ready(function () {
    //do stuff here
});

I can't tell which library you're using here, but they all have an equivalent of jQuery's document ready.

Here's the prototype equivalent:

document.observe("dom:loaded", function() {
  // do stuff
});
share|improve this answer
    
In fact I wanted to do something more complicated, because in my real page, I have many <input> and then many <script> tags, each of them being specific (because the function fooBar() will do different thing, regarding the <input>). So now, I indeed execute X times the $(document).ready() method... –  romaintaz Oct 1 '10 at 12:34
    
@romaintaz: You can put as much code in $(document).ready() as you want - there's no point calling it more than once. –  Skilldrick Oct 1 '10 at 12:50
    
@romaintaz: see update to my answer... instead of waiting for the entire document to load, each input element can have its own load listener. –  Dagg Nabbit Oct 1 '10 at 12:53

Try putting your code in load event:

$(window).load(function(){
  $("#xxx").fooBar = function() { ... };
});
share|improve this answer

If the code has to be directly before the input, you can check if it has loaded after a certain period of time.

<script type="text/javascript">
    //Sets up a function to execute once the input is loaded
    f = function () 
        {
        //Checks if 'xxx' exists (may vary between frameworks)
        if ($("xxx") !== undefined) 
            {
            $("xxx").fooBar = function() { ... };
            //Escapes the timer function, preventing it from running again
            return true;
            }
        //If still not loaded check again in half a second (0.5s or 500ms)
        setTimeout(f,500);
        return false;
        }
    f();//Initialize the timer function
</script>
<input id="xxx" .../>
share|improve this answer
    
Clever, but what if this happens? <script>(your script here)</script> <input id="xxx" .../> <script>$("xxx").fooBar()</script> ... the call to fooBar in the second script could execute while the delayed loader is taking a half-second break... –  Dagg Nabbit Oct 1 '10 at 12:31
    
I want to go with a setTimeout approach, but I didn't like it much. But in my case, the fooBar() can be executed only by onchange event of the <input>. So there almost no chance that the fooBar() method is fired within this 500ms... –  romaintaz Oct 1 '10 at 12:35
    
you can reduce the time of the timer to something much more realistic such as 20ms, or 0.02 seconds... But yeah, it's definitely an ugly solution, I wouldn't recommend it. –  Andrew Dunn Oct 1 '10 at 12:40

Instead of adding a method to the dom node, why not make it a separate function, so instead of

$("xxx").fooBar = function() {
  doStuff(this); 
}; 

you would have something like

function xxx_fooBar () {
  var me = document.getElementById('xxx');
  doStuff(me);
};

Another suggestion: If you can add attributes to the <input> element, you could do something like this...

<script>
function xxx_init (e) {
  e.fooBar = function () {
    doStuff(this); 
  };
} 
</script>
<input onload="xxx_init(this)" id="xxx" .../>

Or you could do as others suggest and attach the scripts to the window.onload event.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand how this approach could solve my issue. In such case, I would need to call all my xxx_fooBar() methods when the document is ready... –  romaintaz Oct 1 '10 at 12:37
    
is fooBar really an event listener, like onchange? In that case, this won't help you at all. I was assuming fooBar was just a generic function property, not an event listener. In that case you could just call xxx_fooBar() instead of $("xxx").fooBar(). If fooBar is really onchange or onclick or something, no, this won't work. –  Dagg Nabbit Oct 1 '10 at 12:43
    
@no fooBar() is just a function, called by onchange event indeed, but also by another Javascript method. But when it is called by onchange, it must call myElement.fooBar(); and not myElement_fooBar();. But ok, now I get your idea. –  romaintaz Oct 1 '10 at 12:47
    
Ok, I see what you mean. Made an update, check it out. –  Dagg Nabbit Oct 1 '10 at 12:50

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