Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to safety parse tab-delimiter string ? for example: test\tbla-bla-bla\t2332 ?

share|improve this question
    
It's a bit generic question... could you explain it a little more? BTW, I suppose you mean "safely"... –  Matteo Italia Oct 1 '10 at 13:38
1  
What's the problem? You scan through the string and react to TABs. –  sharptooth Oct 1 '10 at 13:38
add comment

6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

strtok() is a standard function for parsing strings with arbitrary delimiters. It is, however, not thread-safe. Your C library of choice might have a thread-safe variant.

Another standard-compliant way (just wrote this up, it is not tested):

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    char string[] = "foo\tbar\tbaz";
    char * start = string;
    char * end;
    while ( ( end = strchr( start, '\t' ) ) != NULL )
    {
        // %s prints a number of characters, * takes number from stack
        // (your token is not zero-terminated!)
        printf( "%.*s\n", end - start, start );
        start = end + 1;
    }
    // start points to last token, zero-terminated
    printf( "%s", start );
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
the format specifier should read %.*s –  Christoph Oct 1 '10 at 14:25
    
@Christoph: Correct, of course. Confused %c with scanf(), where you need it to read in spaces, and you're also right about the width / precision mixup. Thanks for pointing it out. –  DevSolar Oct 1 '10 at 15:07
add comment

Using strok() from string.h

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main ()
{
    char str[] = "test\tbla-bla-bla\t2332";
    char * pch;
    pch = strtok (str," \t");
    while (pch != NULL)
    {
        printf ("%s\n",pch);
        pch = strtok (NULL, " \t");
    }
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Use strtok_r instead of strtok (if it is available). It has similar usage, except it is reentrant, and it does not modify the string like strtok does. [Edit: Actually, I misspoke. As Christoph points out, strtok_r does replace the delimiters by '\0'. So, you should operate on a copy of the string if you want to preserve the original string. But it is preferable to strtok because it is reentrant and thread safe]

strtok will leave your original string modified. It replaces the delimiter with '\0'. And if your string happens to be a constant, stored in a read only memory (some compilers will do that), you may actually get a access violation.

share|improve this answer
    
afaik strtok_r() works like strtok() - ie it will modify the string, replacing the separator with zeros! the difference between the functions is that strtok_r() doesn't use an internal static variable, but a user-supplied one to store its state –  Christoph Oct 1 '10 at 15:28
    
You are correct! I missed that. So, you would need to operate on a copy of the string. But strtok_r is still preferable because it is reentrant. –  Ziffusion Oct 1 '10 at 15:40
add comment

You can use any regex library or even the GLib GScanner, see here and here for more information.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yet another version; this one separates the logic into a new function

#include <stdio.h>

static _Bool next_token(const char **start, const char **end)
{
    if(!*end) *end = *start;    // first call
    else if(!**end)             // check for terminating zero
        return 0;
    else *start = ++*end;       // skip tab

    // advance to terminating zero or next tab
    while(**end && **end != '\t')
        ++*end;

    return 1;
}

int main(void)
{
    const char *string = "foo\tbar\tbaz";

    const char *start = string;
    const char *end = NULL; // NULL value indicates first call

    while(next_token(&start, &end))
    {
        // print substring [start,end[
        printf("%.*s\n", end - start, start);
    }

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you need a binary safe way to tokenize a given string:

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void tokenize(const char *str, const char delim, const size_t size)
{
        const char *start = str, *next;
        const char *end = str + size;

        while (start < end) {
                if ((next = memchr(start, delim, end - start)) == NULL) {
                        next = end;
                }

                printf("%.*s\n", next - start, start);
                start = next + 1;
        }
}

int main(void)
{
        char str[] = "test\tbla-bla-bla\t2332";
        int len = strlen(str);

        tokenize(str, '\t', len);

        return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.