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I'm trying to find a solution for this problem. This is my example code:

class Program
{
  private string Command;

  private static string[] Commands = { "ComandOne", "CommandTwo", "CommandThree", "CommandFour" };


  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    Command = args[0];
    switch(Command)
    {
      case Commands[0]: //do something 
        break;
      case Commands[1]: //do something else
        break;
      case Commands[2]: //do something totally different
        break;
      case Commands[3]: //do something boring
        break;
      default: //do your default stuff
        break;
    }
  }

  void DifferentMethod()
  {
    foreach(string c in Commands)
    {
      //do something funny
    }
  }
}

This code doesn't work because the string values in the switch are not constants. I want to write easy maintainable code.
I like to use something like an array because I need to use the same values somewhere else in a loop.
With int-values an enum would be perfect, but I didn't find a small solution for the same thing with strings.

share|improve this question
1  
Most solutions suggest enumerations, but enumeration names have special naming requirements. If this causes problems, you can bind a DescriptionAttribute to each enumeration item to contain a friendly names (which could have spaces or whatever), and could look up those names when iterating over the enumeration within DifferentMethod. –  Brian Oct 1 '10 at 14:48
    
@Brian, good point, and to get that attribute, you will need the field: FieldInfo enumField = typeof(Commands).GetField(enumValue.ToString()); –  Kirk Woll Oct 1 '10 at 19:00
    
@Kirk Woll: The next two lines after that being: DescriptionAttribute da = (DescriptionAttribute)Attribute.GetCustomAttribute(enumField, typeof(DescriptionAttribute)); if (da.Description != null) description = da.Description; –  Brian Oct 1 '10 at 19:25

9 Answers 9

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I generally dislike strings for this sort of thing - it's too easy to get into trouble with misspellings, different casings and the like - but presumably that's why you want to use a variable instead of string literal. If the enum solutions aren't suitable, using consts should accomplish your goal.

EDIT: Oct 28, 2013 to fix an incorrect assignment

class Program
{
    private string Command;

    const string command1 = "CommandOne";
    const string command2 = "CommandTwo";
    const string command3 = "CommandThree";
    const string command4 = "CommandFour";

    private static string[] Commands = { command1, command2, command3, command4 };

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string Command = args[0];
        switch (Command)
        {
            case command1: //do something 
                break;
            case command2: //do something else
                break;
            case command3: //do something totally different
                break;
            case command4: //do something boring
                break;
            default: //do your default stuff
                break;
        }
    }

    void DifferentMethod()
    {
        foreach (string c in Commands)
        {
            //do something funny
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I can't see how this addresses the question. In the question, @Philipp M has Command = args[0], but you don't use args at all. and instead you use a string from your array of strings. To me this looks like it is going to compare by reference not by the contents of the strings itself so wouldn't work with Command = args[0]. –  TooTone Sep 19 '13 at 11:31
    
@TooTone - You found a three-year old assignment error. That should indeed say string Command = args[0]. I'll fix that momentarily, but the important part is the switch based on a set of of named constants vs. the array indices @Phillip M originally used. The values in the array are identical to those in the constants; give it a try (with the correction) and you'll see that this does indeed accomplish the goal. –  ThatBlairGuy Oct 28 '13 at 22:17
    
You're right it does work, thanks for responding. –  TooTone Oct 29 '13 at 11:32

Convert Commands into an enum:

enum Commands { ComandOne, CommandTwo, CommandThree, CommandFour }

Switch statement should look like:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    Command = Enum.Parse(typeof(Commands), args[0]);
    switch(Command)
    {
        case Commands.CommandOne: 
            //do something 
            break;
        case Commands.CommandTwo: 
            //do something else
            break;
        ...
        default:
            // default stuff
    }
}

And your last method should look like:

void DifferentMethod()
{
    foreach(var c in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Commands)))
    {
        string s = c.ToString(); 
        //do something funny
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 This looks to be the simplest way to get where the OP wants to go. –  Chris Lively Oct 1 '10 at 14:24
1  
i recommend to pre-calculate Enum.GetValues(typeof(Commands)) and store somewhere. it is not cheap operation. –  Andrey Oct 1 '10 at 14:25
2  
+1 Stable and easy to read. –  RedFilter Oct 1 '10 at 14:27
1  
@Andrey: I disagree. DifferentMethod() only takes about a dozen or so microseconds each call on my machine. Precalculating the enumeration is worth doing if profiling finds it as a bottleneck that needs fixing, and I'd be suspicious if the proper solution was to have a static precalculated copy of the enumeration. I'd rather save such optimizations until necessary (i.e. you profiled and this was the bottleneck); it makes the code slightly more complicated to have commands stored both as an enumeration and as a collection of strings. –  Brian Oct 1 '10 at 14:41
    
Isn't Enum.Parse() internally doing a switch on the string? Performance wise, calling that method alone would be just as expensive as the original method. –  manixrock Oct 1 '10 at 15:18

An easy fix in your specific example:

switch(Array.IndexOf(Commands, Command))
{
    case 0: ...  
    case 1: ...

    default: //unknown command. Technically, this is case -1
} 

Other alternatives:

  1. Inline the strings.

    switch(Command) { case "CommandOne": ... case "CommandTwo": ... }

  2. Use an enumeration instead, as KirkWoll says. This is probably the cleanest solution.

  3. In more complex scenarios, using a lookup such as Dictionary<string, Action> or Dictionary<string, Func<Foo>> might provide better expressibility.

  4. If the cases are complex, you could create an ICommand interface. This will require mapping the command-string to the right concrete-implementation, for which you use simple constructs (switch / dictionaries) or fancy reflection (find ICommand implementations with that name, or with a certain attribute decoration).

share|improve this answer
3  
+1. The OP is probably better off with Kirk's solution, but this is closer to showing the way to do exactly what he is asking for. –  Brian Oct 1 '10 at 14:45

Just yesterday i created a solution for it. In your case enums are better but here is my solution for general non-const switch-case situation.

usages:

    static string DigitToStr(int i)
    {
        return i
            .Case(1, "one")
            .Case(2, "two")
            .Case(3, "three")
            .Case(4, "four")
            .Case(5, "five")
            .Case(6, "six")
            .Case(7, "seven")
            .Case(8, "eight")
            .Case(9, "nine")
            .Default("");
    }

        int a = 1, b = 2, c = 3;
        int d = (4 * a * c - b * 2);
        string res = true
            .Case(d < 0, "No roots")
            .Case(d == 0, "One root")
            .Case(d > 0, "Two roots")
            .Default(_ => { throw new Exception("Impossible!"); });

        string res2 = d
            .Case(x => x < 0, "No roots")
            .Case(x => x == 0, "One root")
            .Case(x => x > 0, "Two roots")
            .Default(_ => { throw new Exception("Impossible!"); });

        string ranges = 11
            .Case(1, "one")
            .Case(2, "two")
            .Case(3, "three")
            .Case(x => x >= 4 && x < 10, "small")
            .Case(10, "ten")
            .Default("big");

definition:

class Res<O, R>
{
    public O value;
    public bool succ;
    public R result;

    public Res()
    {

    }

    static public implicit operator R(Res<O, R> v)
    {
        if (!v.succ)
            throw new ArgumentException("No case condition is true and there is no default block");
        return v.result;
    }
}

static class Op
{
    static public Res<O, R> Case<O, V, R>(this Res<O, R> o, V v, R r)
    {
        if (!o.succ && Equals(o.value, v))
        {
            o.result = r;
            o.succ = true;
        }
        return o;
    }

    static public Res<O, R> Case<O, V, R>(this O o, V v, R r)
    {
        return new Res<O, R>()
        {
            value = o,
            result = r,
            succ = Equals(o, v),
        };
    }

    static public Res<O, R> Case<O, R>(this Res<O, R> o, Predicate<O> cond, R r)
    {
        if (!o.succ && cond(o.value))
        {
            o.result = r;
            o.succ = true;
        }
        return o;
    }

    static public Res<O, R> Case<O, R>(this O o, Predicate<O> cond, R r)
    {
        return new Res<O, R>()
        {
            value = o,
            result = r,
            succ = cond(o),
        };
    }

    private static bool Equals<O, V>(O o, V v)
    {
        return o == null ? v == null : o.Equals(v);
    }

    static public R Default<O, R>(this Res<O, R> o, R r)
    {
        return o.succ
            ? o.result
            : r;
    }

    static public R Default<O, R>(this Res<O, R> o, Func<O, R> def)
    {
        return o.succ ? o.result : def(o.value);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You could eliminate the switch statement altogether by creating IYourCommand objects and loading them into a Dictionary<string, IYourCommand>.

class Program
{
  private Dictionary<string, IYourCommand> Command = new Dictionary<string, IYourCommand>
    {
       { "CommandOne",   new CommandOne()   },
       { "CommandTwo",   new CommandTwo()   },
       { "CommandThree", new CommandThree() },
       { "CommandFour",  new CommandFour()  },
    };

  public static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    if (Command.ContainsKey(args[0]))
    {
      Command[args[0]].DoSomething();
    }
  }
}

public interface IYourCommand
{
  void DoSomething();
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1, I didn't know about ICommand before. Thanks! –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Oct 1 '10 at 15:17
    
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: No, no. ICommand in this context is a mythical interface. You will have to create that interface and give it whatever name you prefer. –  Brian Gideon Oct 1 '10 at 16:02
    
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: I edited my answer to make it more clear. –  Brian Gideon Oct 1 '10 at 16:08
    
Ah ok. I thought there was something new and cool out there. Still, I like this design. Really seems the best choice for the OP's specific problem. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner Oct 1 '10 at 16:12
    
+1 for best in show –  Biff MaGriff Oct 1 '10 at 17:13

Define a Dictionary<string, enum> and map the input command to the appropriate value before entering the switch. If match is not found, then default processing happens.

share|improve this answer

As you said, only constant expressions are allowed in a switch. You would normally do this by defining an enum and use that in your switch.

class Program
{
  private enum Command
  {
    CommandOne = 1,
    CommandTwo = 2,
    CommandThree = 3
  }

  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
    var command = Enum.Parse(typeof(Commands), args[0]);
    switch(command )
    {
      case Command.CommandOne: //do something 
        break;
      case Command.CommandTwo: //do something else
        break;
      case Command.CommandThree: //do something totally different
        break;
      default: //do your default stuff
        break;
    }
  }
}

Use Enum.GetValues to enumerate through enum values in DifferentMethod.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Enums are certainly the way to go for collections of like preset values. –  BoltClock Oct 1 '10 at 14:20
    
DifferentMethod does not work any more after the change... –  Heinzi Oct 1 '10 at 14:23
    
You can't cast args[0] directly to Command. Use Parse or TryParse instead. –  digEmAll Oct 1 '10 at 14:28
    
@Heinzi: As Kirk indicates, that's what Enum.GetValues is for. –  Brian Oct 1 '10 at 14:43
1  
You're right people can think for themselves, but it is not unusual to read questioner comments like: "I tried the code but it doesn't compile". So I always prefer to write code that at least compiles ;) –  digEmAll Oct 1 '10 at 14:58

You can do it the other way around and reach your objective.

Use Enum and its GetNames call to get a string array to loop through.

Enum.GetNames(typeof (*YOURENUM*));

For more info. http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.enum.getnames.aspx

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Great answers here and probably answer your question better than what I'm going to mention...

Depending on how complicated your logic is based, you may consider using a strategy pattern like this:

Refactoring a Switch statement

or

The Strategy Template Pattern

Again, most likely more complicated than your solution asked, just throwing it out there...

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