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I am implementing a class to be Serializable (so it's a value object for use w/ RMI). But I need to test it. Is there a way to do this easily?

clarification: I'm implementing the class, so it's trivial to stick Serializable in the class definition. I need to manually serialize/deserialize it to see if it works.

I found this C# question, is there a similar answer for Java?

share|improve this question
    
Are you trying to test to see if the object gets serialized and deserialized properly? – Vivin Paliath Oct 1 '10 at 15:06
    
yes. (.........) – Jason S Oct 1 '10 at 15:13
up vote 67 down vote accepted

The easy way is to check that the object is an instance of java.io.Serializable or java.io.Externalizable, but that doesn't really prove that the object really is serializable.

The only way to be sure is to try it for real. The simplest test is something like:

new ObjectOutputStream(new ByteArrayOutputStream()).writeObject(myObject);

and check it doesn't throw an exception.

Apache Commons Lang provides a rather more brief version:

SerializationUtils.serialize(myObject);

and again, check for the exception.

You can be more rigourous still, and check that it deserializes back into something equal to the original:

Serializable original = ...
Serializable copy = SerializationUtils.clone(original);
assertEquals(original, copy);

and so on.

share|improve this answer
    
cool, thanks, that's the intro I needed. – Jason S Oct 1 '10 at 15:47
    
Just in case anyone is curious or doesn't want to include the Apache Commons libraries, Spring also has SerializationUtils with the methods serialize and deserialize. See SerializationUtils – Peter Kirby May 20 '14 at 3:29
    
Your answer helped me, but deserialize() and clone() return Object, not Serializable. – NeplatnyUdaj Jul 10 '15 at 10:30
    
In the old commons-lang v2 that's true, but not since v3 - commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/javadocs/api-3.4/org/… – skaffman Jul 11 '15 at 11:00

utility methods based on skaffman's answer:

private static <T extends Serializable> byte[] pickle(T obj) 
       throws IOException 
{
    ByteArrayOutputStream baos = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
    ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(baos);
    oos.writeObject(obj);
    oos.close();
    return baos.toByteArray();
}

private static <T extends Serializable> T unpickle(byte[] b, Class<T> cl)
       throws IOException, ClassNotFoundException 
{
    ByteArrayInputStream bais = new ByteArrayInputStream(b);
    ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(bais);
    Object o = ois.readObject();
    return cl.cast(o);
}
share|improve this answer
    
++thanks to you and skaffman! I was looking for something like this to add to a test harness to stop developers from writing code that is non-Serializable and killing our apps once they reach our clustered server. A life-saver! Thanks guys! – Chris Aldrich Jan 10 '12 at 18:31
    
More about the "pickling" term here: docs.python.org/2/library/pickle.html – span Jul 8 '15 at 9:31

This code should do it...

import java.io.ByteArrayOutputStream;
import java.io.Externalizable;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;
import java.io.OutputStream;
import java.io.Serializable;

public class Main
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println(isSerializable("Hello"));
        System.out.println(isSerializable(new Main()));
    }

    public static boolean isSerializable(final Object o)
    {
        final boolean retVal;

        if(implementsInterface(o))
        {
            retVal = attemptToSerialize(o);
        }
        else
        {
            retVal = false;
        }

        return (retVal);
    }

    private static boolean implementsInterface(final Object o)
    {
        final boolean retVal;

        retVal = ((o instanceof Serializable) || (o instanceof Externalizable));

        return (retVal);
    }

    private static boolean attemptToSerialize(final Object o)
    {
        final OutputStream sink;
        ObjectOutputStream stream;

        stream = null;

        try
        {
            sink   = new ByteArrayOutputStream();
            stream = new ObjectOutputStream(sink);
            stream.writeObject(o);
            // could also re-serilalize at this point too
        }
        catch(final IOException ex)
        {
            return (false);
        }
        finally
        {
            if(stream != null)
            {
                try
                {
                    stream.close();
                }
                catch(final IOException ex)
                {
                    // should not be able to happen
                }
            }
        }

        return (true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The short answer is, you can come up with some candidate objects and actually try to serialize them using the mechanism of your choice. The test here is that no errors are encountered during marshalling/unmarshalling, and that the resulting "rehydrated" object is equal to the original.

Alternatively, if you don't have any candidate objects, you could implement a reflection-based test that introspects the (non-static, non-transient) fields of your class to ensure that they too are Serializable. Speaking from experience, this gets surprisingly complex surprisingly quickly, but it can be done to a reasonable extent.

The downside to this latter approach is that if a field is e.g. List<String>, then you can either fail the class for not having a strictly serializable field, or simply assume that a serializable implementation of List will be used. Neither is perfect. (Mind you, the latter problem exists for examples too; if every example used in the test uses serializable Lists, there's nothing to prevent a non-serializable version being used by some other code in practice).

share|improve this answer

You can do following test:

  • Serialize object to file and make sure no exception is thrown.
  • Additionally, deserialize object back and compare with original object.

Here is example for serializing and deserializing object to file:

http://www.rgagnon.com/javadetails/java-0075.html

http://www.javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=57

share|improve this answer

This only works for fully populated objects, if you require that any objects composed in your top level object are also serializable then they cannot be null for this test to be valid as serialization/deserialization skips the null objects

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If the class is from Java libraries, e.g. String, then just google "java.lang.string" (can see this structure through mouse hover) and you'll find:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/String.html

where you can see if it implements Serializable or not.

share|improve this answer
    
Read the question, it was about a class that I implement. – Jason S Oct 10 '13 at 13:48

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