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Assuming that a memory address occupies 4 bytes and a char occupies 1 byte:

char** t;
t = malloc(5 * sizeof(char*));
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
 t[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * (i+1));
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My answer is 39. But, I'm not certain. –  Adam Soffer Oct 1 '10 at 15:26
1  
A char always occupies 1 byte - according to the standard. –  sje397 Oct 1 '10 at 15:29
1  
malloc does not guarantee to allocate exactly the number of bytes requested. malloc allocates at least the amount requested. Which means that the correct answer to the question will always state that "at least N bytes is allocated", whatever that N is. –  AnT Oct 1 '10 at 15:32
    
the char ** is not dynamically allocated –  sje397 Oct 1 '10 at 15:32
    
Thanks ppl. For some reason I thought the double pointer itself constituted as an additional 4 bytes. –  Adam Soffer Oct 1 '10 at 17:02

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

35 bytes (Look below for breakup)

char** t;
t = malloc(5 * sizeof(char*));  // 5 * 4 = 20 bytes
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
 t[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * (i+1)); //1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 5 = 15 bytes
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Better than last answer, you saw the i+1. –  André Caron Oct 1 '10 at 15:29
    
So, that does indeed add up to (0+1)=1, (0+2)=2 ....(0+4)=5. Look before you leap. –  user191776 Oct 1 '10 at 15:31

A minimum of around 35 bytes -- but a typical implementation of malloc will have some minimum allocation size it supports, so in reality, you can expect it to use more memory than that (though exactly how much more will vary).

In a typical case, the minimum allocation will be something like 16 or even 32 bytes, in which case most of the sizes you specified above don't really make any difference -- the last 5 allocations will all be of whatever the minimum happens to be. In a typical case, sizes larger than that will be rounded up to the next power of 2 as well.

That would give 32 bytes for your first allocation, and either 16 or 32 (i.e., the minimum supported size) for each of your other five, for a total of either 112 or 192 bytes.

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The way I might put it is that it allocates 35 bytes which are useable to the program, but the cost/overhead of the allocations is higher. –  Steve Jessop Oct 1 '10 at 15:46

Let the computer compute for you:

char** t;
t = (char**) malloc(5 * sizeof(char*));
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    t[i] = (char*) malloc(sizeof(char) * (i+1));

unsigned int sz = 5 * sizeof(char*);
for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    sz += sizeof(char) * (i+1);

printf("%d\n", sz);
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35 on a 32 bits machine.

20 for that

t = malloc(5 * sizeof(char*));

15 for that: 5+4+3+2+1

int i;
for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
 t[i] = malloc(sizeof(char) * (i+1));
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Get how many bytes are allocated ON YOUR SYSTEM with, for example

#define malloc(s) mm(s)

void *mm(size_t s) {
    printf("allocating %d ...\n", (int)s);
    return (malloc)(s);
}

/* your code */

Of course, you can sum the sizes instead of printing them.

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The malloc() allocates space rounded up to 16 bytes (at least in win32), so you'll use 32 bytes in the first alloc and 16*5 in the loop.

There is also overhead of malloc (both, time and memory), because malloc() puts a special header, _CrtMemBlockHeader before the memory area it returns (that's why you have to give exactly the same pointer to the free() and are able to use functions like _msize().

So, the memory amount actually used would be 32 + 80 = 112 bytes. Considering also the overhead for header: + 5 * sizeof(__CrtMemBlockHeader)

the final amount can be as high as 300 bytes, that is ~8 times larger than the expected 35.

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