Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Just curious about SQL syntax. So if I have

SELECT 
 itemName as ItemName,
 substring(itemName, 1,1) as FirstLetter,
 Count(itemName)
FROM table1
GROUP BY itemName, FirstLetter

This would be incorrect because

GROUP BY itemName, FirstLetter 

really should be

GROUP BY itemName, substring(itemName, 1,1)

But why can't we simply use the former for convenience?

share|improve this question
    
that's allowed in Postgresql –  Michael Buen Oct 1 '10 at 18:11
    
MySQL allows it also –  Kip Aug 9 '13 at 19:40
add comment

7 Answers

up vote 33 down vote accepted

SQL is implemented as if a query was executed in the following order:

  1. FROM clause
  2. WHERE clause
  3. GROUP BY clause
  4. HAVING clause
  5. SELECT clause
  6. ORDER BY clause

This order in most relational database systems explains which names (columns or aliases) are valid because they must have been introduced in a previous step. There are exceptions though.

share|improve this answer
    
I like this explanation. Although I can't speculate how difficult it is to add it to an engine as syntactic sugar. –  Haoest Oct 1 '10 at 20:23
1  
Any idea if the DB is smart enough to realize the same expression is in the SELECT and GROUP BY clauses without re-evaluating the expressions? i.e. if there is GROUP BY substring(itemName, 1,1), is the database smart enough not to take the performance hit of recomputing the substring in the SELECT clause? –  Kip Aug 9 '13 at 19:42
    
In the SELECT clause of a query with grouping, you only have access to the GROUP BY expressions and aggregated values. So it's not about being smart; it has to be implemented that way for the grouping to work. (And it's required by the SQL standard). But even in more trivial cases (e.g. the same expression in the WHERE and the SELECT clause), state-of-the-art database systems will certainly only compute it once. This optimization is called common sub-expression elimination. –  Codo Aug 9 '13 at 19:50
add comment

You could always use a subquery so you can use the alias; Of course, check the performance (Possible the db server will run both the same, but never hurts to verify):

SELECT ItemName, FirstLetter, COUNT(ItemName)
FROM (
    SELECT ItemName, SUBSTRING(ItemName, 1, 1) AS FirstLetter
    FROM table1
    ) ItemNames
GROUP BY ItemName, FirstLetter
share|improve this answer
add comment

At least in PostgreSQL you can use the column number in the resultset in your GROUP BY clause:

SELECT 
 itemName as ItemName,
 substring(itemName, 1,1) as FirstLetter,
 Count(itemName)
FROM table1
GROUP BY 1, 2

Of course this starts to be a pain if you are doing this interactively and you edit the query to change the number or order of columns in the result. But still.

share|improve this answer
    
GROUP BY FirstLetter is allowed in Postgresql. To wit, try running this in Postgresql: select substring(table_name,1,2) as tname from information_schema.tables group by tname –  Michael Buen Oct 1 '10 at 18:09
add comment

SQL Server doesn't allow you to reference the alias in the GROUP BY clause because of the logical order of processing. The GROUP BY clause is processed before the SELECT clause, so the alias is not known when the GROUP BY clause is evaluated. This also explains why you can use the alias in the ORDER BY clause.

Here is one source for information on the SQL Server logical processing phases.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Some DBMSs will let you use an alias instead of having to repeat the entire expression.
Teradata is one such example.

I avoid ordinal position notation as recommended by Bill for reasons documented in this SO question.

The easy and robust alternative is to always repeat the expression in the GROUP BY clause.
DRY does NOT apply to SQL.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Back in the day I found that Rdb, the former DEC product now supported by Oracle allowed the column alias to be used in the GROUP BY. Mainstream Oracle through version 11 does not allow the column alias to be used in the GROUP BY. Not sure what Postgresql, SQL Server, MySQL, etc will or won't allow. YMMV.

share|improve this answer
add comment

it's an old question, but this might be useful:

Simply try to use an existing column name, which you do not need to select, as an alias, something like

SELECT 
 substring(itemName, 1,1) as itemName ...

Another solution would be to create a view and drop it after your main query. In most cases this is the most efficient way

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.