Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I like the Java convention of having one public class per file, even if there are sometimes good reasons to put more than one public class into a single file. In my case I have alternative implementations of the same interface. But if I would place them into separate files, I'd have redundant names in the import statements (or misleading module names):

import someConverter.SomeConverter

whereas someConverter would be the file (and module) name and SomeConverter the class name. This looks pretty inelegant to me. To put all alternative classes into one file would lead to a more meaningful import statement:

import converters.SomeConverter

But I fear that the files become pretty large, if I put all related classes into a single module file. What is the Python best practise here? Is one class per file unusual?

share|improve this question
4  
By the time you're dealing with a project consisting of 10'000 classes, you'll be happy if you can find a (public) class by its file (and package) name instead of having to search the contents of all files.. that's probably the rationale why Java enforces that there is only one public class per file and that the file name must be the class name. –  Andre Holzner Oct 1 '10 at 20:10
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 38 down vote accepted

A lot of it is personal preference. Using python modules, you do have the option to keep each class in a separate file and still allow for import converters.SomeConverter (or from converters import SomeConverter)

Your file structure could look something like this:

* converters
     - __init__.py
     - baseconverter.py
     - someconverter.py
     - otherconverter.py

and then in your __init__.py file:

from baseconverter import BaseConverter
from otherconverter import OtherConverter
share|improve this answer
add comment

Zach's solution breaks on Python 3. Here is a fixed solution.

A lot of it is personal preference. Using python modules, you do have the option to keep each class in a separate file and still allow for import converters.SomeConverter (or from converters import SomeConverter)

Your file structure could look something like this:

* converters
     - __init__.py
     - baseconverter.py
     - someconverter.py
     - otherconverter.py

and then in your __init__.py file:

from converters.baseconverter import BaseConverter
from converters.otherconverter import OtherConverter
share|improve this answer
1  
How about just "from .baseconverter import BaseConverter" ? –  Michael Clerx Feb 1 at 15:09
    
Sorry for the late follow up, I've been out of touch with python in recent times, if someone can verify Michael's solution above then please feel free to edit my answer and add that as alternative. (Don't change my original because I think it's a matter of preference as to which one looks more readable so let's give the users both the options) –  Spundun Mar 10 at 16:29
    
Michael's answer does work, but PEP 8 discourages relative imports. stackoverflow.com/questions/4209641/… –  Jason Pearson Apr 26 at 13:34
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.