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I'm trying to use GridBagLayout to position labels in two rows, but I want some of the labels to span both rows and others to be placed on top of each other. I need to use GridBagLayout because of the proportional sizing functionality in the weightx and weighty properties of GridBagConstraints. This is the layout I'm looking for:

+----------+----------+----------+----------+
|          |          |  labelC  |          |
|  labelA  |  labelB  |----------|  labelD  |
|          |          |  labelE  |          |
+----------+----------+----------+----------+

The problem is that labelE is being placed beneath LabelA. Here is the layout portion of my code:

GridBagLayout gridbag = new GridBagLayout();
GridBagConstraints c = new GridBagConstraints();
this.setLayout(gridBag);
c.fill = GridBagConstraints.BOTH;

c.gridwidth = 1;
c.gridheight = 2;
c.weighty = PANEL_HEIGHT;
gridbag.setConstraints(labelA, c);
this.add(labelA);

gridbag.setConstraints(labelB, c);
this.add(labelB);

c.gridheight = 1;
c.weighty = TOPROW_HEIGHT;
gridbag.setConstraints(labelC, c);
this.add(labelC);

c.gridheight = 2;
c.gridwidth = GridBagConstraints.REMAINDER;
c.weighty = PANEL_HEIGHT;
gridbag.setConstraints(labelD, c);
this.add(labelD);

c.gridheight = 1;
c.gridwidth = 1;
c.weighty = BOTROW_HEIGHT;
gridbag.setConstraints(labelE, c);
this.add(labelE);

this.validate();

Any ideas about what I'm missing?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use gridx and gridy to select your position on the grid :

    GridBagLayout gridbag = new GridBagLayout();
    GridBagConstraints c = new GridBagConstraints();

    this.setLayout(gridbag);

    c.fill = GridBagConstraints.BOTH;

    c.gridwidth = 1;
    c.gridheight = 2;
    c.gridx = 0;
    c.gridy = 0;
    c.weighty = PANEL_HEIGHT;
    gridbag.setConstraints(labelA, c);
    this.add(labelA);

    c.gridx = 1;
    c.gridy = 0;
    gridbag.setConstraints(labelB, c);
    this.add(labelB);

    c.gridx = 2;
    c.gridy = 0;
    c.gridheight = 1;
    c.weighty = TOPROW_HEIGHT;
    gridbag.setConstraints(labelC, c);
    this.add(labelC);


    c.gridx = 3;
    c.gridy = 0;
    c.gridheight = 2;
    c.gridwidth = GridBagConstraints.REMAINDER;
    c.weighty = PANEL_HEIGHT;
    gridbag.setConstraints(labelD, c);
    this.add(labelD);

    c.gridx = 2;
    c.gridy = 1;
    c.fill = GridBagConstraints.VERTICAL;
    c.gridheight = 1;
    c.gridwidth = 1;
    c.weighty = BOTROW_HEIGHT;
    gridbag.setConstraints(labelE, c);
    this.add(labelE);

    this.validate();
share|improve this answer
    
Oddly enough, gridx and gridy are not used in the GridBagLayout javadoc sample code, although it has this behavior. However, this works perfectly. Thanks, Colin! –  Erick Robertson Oct 1 '10 at 21:03
    
Don't need this.pack(), though. –  Erick Robertson Oct 1 '10 at 21:04
    
@Erick Robertson, You're right, it's just a leftover from my modification attempts. You can find some examples of GridBagLayout on java tutorials : download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/uiswing/layout/gridbag.html –  Colin Hebert Oct 1 '10 at 21:06
    
I actually have quite a nice implementation of it in another component where I added panels into the GridBaglayout which I use to resize the other panels by changing the weighty appropriately. But in that implementation, everything always lined up in a perfect grid - there were no spanning columns or rows. –  Erick Robertson Oct 1 '10 at 21:10

You need to set the gridX and gridY:

GridBagLayout gridbag = new GridBagLayout();
GridBagConstraints c = new GridBagConstraints();
this.setLayout(gridBag);
c.fill = GridBagConstraints.BOTH;

c.gridwidth = 1;
c.gridheight = 2;
c.gridx = 0;
c.gridy = 0;
c.weighty = PANEL_HEIGHT;
gridbag.setConstraints(labelA, c);
this.add(labelA);

c.gridx = 1;
c.gridy = 0;
gridbag.setConstraints(labelB, c);
this.add(labelB);

c.gridx = 2;
c.gridy = 0;
c.gridheight = 1;
c.weighty = TOPROW_HEIGHT;
gridbag.setConstraints(labelC, c);
this.add(labelC);

c.gridx = 3;
c.gridy = 0;
c.gridheight = 2;
c.gridwidth = GridBagConstraints.REMAINDER;
c.weighty = PANEL_HEIGHT;
gridbag.setConstraints(labelD, c);
this.add(labelD);

c.gridx = 2;
c.gridy = 1;
c.gridheight = 1;
c.gridwidth = 1;
c.weighty = BOTROW_HEIGHT;
gridbag.setConstraints(labelE, c);
this.add(labelE);

this.validate();

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Just wanted to say thanks for the solution. You and Colin answered at exactly the same time. +1 –  Erick Robertson Oct 1 '10 at 21:28
    
@Erick no problem, glad I could help you out. The biggest problem with gridbag I have seen people have is exactly this - the column spanning issue. Glad to see it worked for you! :) –  aperkins Oct 4 '10 at 14:01

My suggestion is you can do the above without using a GridBaglayout. It will save you a lot of time and reduced number of lines. For your particular problem, you can achieve what you're trying to using a simple Grid Layout.

Create one GridLayout of size 1x4. For the third column, you can use another GridLayout of size 2x1. Put them all in place and you should achieve what you want.

import java.awt.Component;
import java.awt.GridLayout;

import javax.swing.*;

public class LayoutTest extends JFrame {

    public LayoutTest(){
        this.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        this.setLocationRelativeTo(null);
        this.setSize(300,75);
        this.add(getCustomPanel());
        this.setVisible(true);
    }

    private Component getCustomPanel() {
        JPanel pnl = new JPanel();
        GridLayout gridLayout = new GridLayout(1,4);
        pnl.setLayout(gridLayout);

        JPanel subPanel = new JPanel();
        GridLayout subLayout = new GridLayout(2,1);
        subPanel.setLayout(subLayout);

        subPanel.add(new JLabel("labelC"));
        subPanel.add(new JLabel("labelE"));

        pnl.add(new JLabel("labelA"));
        pnl.add(new JLabel("labelB"));
        pnl.add(subPanel);
        pnl.add(new JLabel("labelD"));

        return pnl;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        new LayoutTest();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The problem I have with GridLayout is the lack of setting the heights and widths of each component. The weightx and weighty parts of the GridBagConstraints class work perfectly for how I need this panel to size. I omitted the weightx from the sample code because it is irrelevant to the problem. Because of this, however, GridLayout will not suit my needs. Sorry. –  Erick Robertson Oct 1 '10 at 20:58
    
Not that I am against GridBagLayout. I myself have used it many times. But when you start coding without the help of a Swing editor like Netbeans, the code becomes really crazy in size with a GridBagLayout. That is the reason I thought I would suggest GridLayout. Plus, why dont you try Netbeans, it does real magic.. Just my few cents. –  bragboy Oct 1 '10 at 21:01
    
I learn a lot more when I do it manually. I generally don't like to trust any sort of graphical layout editor to write my code. I don't see this as being that hard - and the code is going to be crazy in size anyways whether I write it or generate it. Typically, I use GroupLayout, actually. It's very powerful. –  Erick Robertson Oct 1 '10 at 21:08
1  
GridBagLayout was intended to work with GUI editors, it's actually not a good layout manager for manual editing because it tends to be very difficult to get it to scale (change window size) smoothly in an intuitive manner. I'd find a way to make GridLayout or some other nesting layouts to work OR create a routine to generate your layout for you--but don't put all that crap in your code--horrible horrible programming--keep your data and your code separate! –  Bill K Oct 1 '10 at 21:11
1  
@Erick Yeah, XML often sucks. I tend to stick my constants in arrays at the top and iterate over them. The code will ALWAYS be faster than the UI can paint, but being able to see the data as abstract from the code leads to huge factoring benefits and significantly enhanced reuse & maintenance. Arrays tend to have a nice, lean (really minimal actually) syntax and can be laid out in a pattern that visibly fits what you are trying to accomplish. How would you reuse that code you've written? Do you really think it's impossible to reuse? A bad idea? (like you'll never have two similar screens) –  Bill K Oct 1 '10 at 21:45

The easiest way to solve this problem (using GridBag) is to have labelC and labelE inside a JPanel.

The more difficult way to solve it, is to use the gridx, gridy and gridheight constraints. So, you would have

+---------------+--------------+----------+----------+
|  gridy=0      | gridy=0      |  gridy=0 |  gridy=0 |
|               |              |  gridx=2 |  gridx=3 |
|  gridx=0      | gridx=1      |----------|          |
|  gridheight=2 | gridheight=2 |  gridy=1 |          |        
|               |              |  gridx=2 |          |
+---------------+--------------+----------+----------+
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand why this is the more difficult way. –  Erick Robertson Oct 1 '10 at 21:10
    
just more coding. Its more difficult, but certainly the right solution. The JPanel allows you to get away with having to worry about gridtheights etc, because it is a single element. The 2 elements inside will then be set out accordingly. –  Codemwnci Oct 1 '10 at 21:13

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