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I have a table called PX_Child that has a foreign key on PX_Parent. I'd like to temporarily disable this FK constraint so that I can truncate PX_Parent. I'm not sure how this goes however.

I've tried these commands

ALTER TABLE PX_Child NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

ALTER TABLE PX_Parent NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

(truncate commands)

ALTER TABLE PX_Child CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

ALTER TABLE PX_Parent CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

But the truncate still tells me it can't truncate PX_Parent because of a foreign key constraint. I've looked all around the net and can't seem to find what I'm doing wrong, sorry for the basic nature of this question.

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1  
Looks like Kalen Delaney was inadvertently responsible for starting this idea off. Here she clarifies "you have to drop the referencing constraint in order to truncate the table." – Martin Smith Oct 2 '10 at 0:37
up vote 24 down vote accepted

You can't truncate the table if there is any foreign key referencing it, including disabled constraints. You either need to drop the foreign key constraints or use the DELETE command.

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1  
See my (5 years later) answer below for how to quickly generate the DROP CONSTRAINT and ADD CONSTRAINT SQL – RJB Apr 24 at 0:53

SQL server will not let you truncate the table while the constraint exists, even if it's disabled. Drop the constraint and re-create it after truncating the table. Or just drop and re-create the tables, whichever is easier to do in your application.

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2  
What do you mean it's not a transactional command? You can roll it back just fine. CREATE TABLE Blah(a int); INSERT Blah VALUES(1); SELECT * FROM Blah; BEGIN TRAN; TRUNCATE TABLE Blah; SELECT * FROM Blah; ROLLBACK TRAN SELECT * FROM Blah; DROP TABLE Blah. Truncate works by deallocating entire pages rather than removing rows, but it's still transactional. – ErikE Oct 2 '10 at 1:11
    
@Emtucifor: Oops, seems like I misinterpreted the documentation you you're right! I removed that piece of misinformation. – Paul Groke Oct 2 '10 at 1:47
    
@Emtucifor, @pgroke, in a way you are both correct as the standard allows for TRUNCATE to be non-transactional, but implementations are allowed to make it transaction. Hence TRUNCATE as defined doesn't promise a rollback can be done, but SqlServer (and Postgres) adds that promise beyond the standard. – Jon Hanna Oct 2 '10 at 10:43
    
@Jon Thanks for clarifying. Let me rephrase. In SQL Server, truncate is transactional. – ErikE Oct 2 '10 at 21:17

There is an easier-ish way. I was faced with the same problem and found this solution: https://www.mssqltips.com/sqlservertip/3347/drop-and-recreate-all-foreign-key-constraints-in-sql-server/

If you just run this query in your DB, it will generate the T-SQL you need to include before/after your sproc, in order to delete and then restore any foreign key constraints.

Don't worry about trying to understand this query itself.

CREATE TABLE #x -- feel free to use a permanent table
(
  drop_script NVARCHAR(MAX),
  create_script NVARCHAR(MAX)
);

DECLARE @drop   NVARCHAR(MAX) = N'',
        @create NVARCHAR(MAX) = N'';

-- drop is easy, just build a simple concatenated list from sys.foreign_keys:
SELECT @drop += N'
ALTER TABLE ' + QUOTENAME(cs.name) + '.' + QUOTENAME(ct.name) 
    + ' DROP CONSTRAINT ' + QUOTENAME(fk.name) + ';'
FROM sys.foreign_keys AS fk
INNER JOIN sys.tables AS ct
  ON fk.parent_object_id = ct.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS cs 
  ON ct.[schema_id] = cs.[schema_id];

INSERT #x(drop_script) SELECT @drop;

-- create is a little more complex. We need to generate the list of 
-- columns on both sides of the constraint, even though in most cases
-- there is only one column.
SELECT @create += N'
ALTER TABLE ' 
   + QUOTENAME(cs.name) + '.' + QUOTENAME(ct.name) 
   + ' ADD CONSTRAINT ' + QUOTENAME(fk.name) 
   + ' FOREIGN KEY (' + STUFF((SELECT ',' + QUOTENAME(c.name)
   -- get all the columns in the constraint table
    FROM sys.columns AS c 
    INNER JOIN sys.foreign_key_columns AS fkc 
    ON fkc.parent_column_id = c.column_id
    AND fkc.parent_object_id = c.[object_id]
    WHERE fkc.constraint_object_id = fk.[object_id]
    ORDER BY fkc.constraint_column_id 
    FOR XML PATH(N''), TYPE).value(N'.[1]', N'nvarchar(max)'), 1, 1, N'')
  + ') REFERENCES ' + QUOTENAME(rs.name) + '.' + QUOTENAME(rt.name)
  + '(' + STUFF((SELECT ',' + QUOTENAME(c.name)
   -- get all the referenced columns
    FROM sys.columns AS c 
    INNER JOIN sys.foreign_key_columns AS fkc 
    ON fkc.referenced_column_id = c.column_id
    AND fkc.referenced_object_id = c.[object_id]
    WHERE fkc.constraint_object_id = fk.[object_id]
    ORDER BY fkc.constraint_column_id 
    FOR XML PATH(N''), TYPE).value(N'.[1]', N'nvarchar(max)'), 1, 1, N'') + ');'
FROM sys.foreign_keys AS fk
INNER JOIN sys.tables AS rt -- referenced table
  ON fk.referenced_object_id = rt.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS rs 
  ON rt.[schema_id] = rs.[schema_id]
INNER JOIN sys.tables AS ct -- constraint table
  ON fk.parent_object_id = ct.[object_id]
INNER JOIN sys.schemas AS cs 
  ON ct.[schema_id] = cs.[schema_id]
WHERE rt.is_ms_shipped = 0 AND ct.is_ms_shipped = 0;

UPDATE #x SET create_script = @create;

PRINT @drop;
PRINT @create;

/*
EXEC sp_executesql @drop
-- clear out data etc. here
EXEC sp_executesql @create;
*/

Generates a bunch of:

ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Whatever] DROP CONSTRAINT....
--
ALTER TABLE [dbo].[Whatever] ADD CONSTRAINT....
share|improve this answer
    
bad advice: "Don't worry about trying to understand this query itself". Never run anything gotten off the net without understanding it – D K May 22 at 20:39
    
True, but it wasn't a production version of the DB – RJB May 22 at 23:01
1  
There is a difference between understanding how a query works and making sure it won't do any harm. The latter is almost always easier. – wolfrevokcats Jul 9 at 9:15
    
Down-voter must not realize how useful this script is.... – RJB Jul 20 at 23:27

From what I have been told because TRUNCATE TABLE is a DDL command it cannot check to see whether the records in the table are being referenced by a record in the child table. This is why DELETE works and TRUNCATE TABLE doesn't, because the database is able to make sure that it isn't being referenced by another record.you don't have to remove the constrain:

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0; -- Disable foreign key checking. TRUNCATE TABLE [YOUR TABLE]; SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1;

share|improve this answer
2  
This might not apply to SQL Server (can't confirm), works in MySQL/MariaDB though. – Matt Mar 19 '14 at 16:22
1  
As Matt said - this answer is not relevant for MSSQL. – itsho Nov 17 '15 at 8:18
1  
This is not a relevant answer. – Reut Sharabani Dec 2 '15 at 14:17

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