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I have a table called PX_Child that has a foreign key on PX_Parent. I'd like to temporarily disable this FK constraint so that I can truncate PX_Parent. I'm not sure how this goes however.

I've tried these commands

ALTER TABLE PX_Child NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

ALTER TABLE PX_Parent NOCHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

(truncate commands)

ALTER TABLE PX_Child CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

ALTER TABLE PX_Parent CHECK CONSTRAINT ALL

But the truncate still tells me it can't truncate PX_Parent because of a foreign key constraint. I've looked all around the net and can't seem to find what I'm doing wrong, sorry for the basic nature of this question.

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Looks like Kalen Delaney was inadvertently responsible for starting this idea off. Here she clarifies "you have to drop the referencing constraint in order to truncate the table." –  Martin Smith Oct 2 '10 at 0:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You can't truncate the table if there is any foreign key referencing it, including disabled constraints. You either need to drop the foreign key constraints or use the DELETE command.

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SQL server will not let you truncate the table while the constraint exists, even if it's disabled. Drop the constraint and re-create it after truncating the table. Or just drop and re-create the tables, whichever is easier to do in your application.

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What do you mean it's not a transactional command? You can roll it back just fine. CREATE TABLE Blah(a int); INSERT Blah VALUES(1); SELECT * FROM Blah; BEGIN TRAN; TRUNCATE TABLE Blah; SELECT * FROM Blah; ROLLBACK TRAN SELECT * FROM Blah; DROP TABLE Blah. Truncate works by deallocating entire pages rather than removing rows, but it's still transactional. –  ErikE Oct 2 '10 at 1:11
    
@Emtucifor: Oops, seems like I misinterpreted the documentation you you're right! I removed that piece of misinformation. –  Paul Groke Oct 2 '10 at 1:47
    
@Emtucifor, @pgroke, in a way you are both correct as the standard allows for TRUNCATE to be non-transactional, but implementations are allowed to make it transaction. Hence TRUNCATE as defined doesn't promise a rollback can be done, but SqlServer (and Postgres) adds that promise beyond the standard. –  Jon Hanna Oct 2 '10 at 10:43
    
@Jon Thanks for clarifying. Let me rephrase. In SQL Server, truncate is transactional. –  ErikE Oct 2 '10 at 21:17

From what I have been told because TRUNCATE TABLE is a DDL command it cannot check to see whether the records in the table are being referenced by a record in the child table. This is why DELETE works and TRUNCATE TABLE doesn't, because the database is able to make sure that it isn't being referenced by another record.you don't have to remove the constrain:

SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 0; -- Disable foreign key checking. TRUNCATE TABLE [YOUR TABLE]; SET FOREIGN_KEY_CHECKS = 1;

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is anything wrong So I get a down vote?? :( –  yash Jan 21 at 7:52
    
This might not apply to SQL Server (can't confirm), works in MySQL/MariaDB though. –  Matt Mar 19 at 16:22
1  
This does not work on sql-server. –  xxx May 13 at 15:03

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