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There's no Sort() function for IList. Can someoene help me with this? I want to sort my own IList.

Suppose this is my IList:

public class MyObject() 
{
 public int number { get; set; }
 public string marker { get; set; }
}

How do I sort myobj using the marker string?

public void SortObject()
{
 IList<MyObject> myobj = new List<MyObject>();
}
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Is myobj always a List? If so, you can cast it to a List and run its Sort function. – Gabe Oct 2 '10 at 5:12
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Use OrderBy

Example

public class MyObject() 
{
    public int number { get; set; }
    public string marker { get; set; }
}

IList<MyObject> myobj = new List<MyObject>();
var orderedList = myobj.OrderBy(x => x.marker).ToList();

For a case insensitive you should use a IComparer

public class CaseInsensitiveComparer : IComparer<string>
{
    public int Compare(string x, string y)
    {
        return string.Compare(x, y, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase);
    }
}

IList<MyObject> myobj = new List<MyObject>();
var orderedList = myobj.OrderBy(x => x.marker, new CaseInsensitiveComparer()).ToList();
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Thanks @Bruno this helps. – Rye Oct 2 '10 at 5:51
1  
+1 for considering case-sensitivity, but the Framework already has case-insensitive string comparers, no need to create one. Try StringComparer.OrdinalIgnoreCase instead of your CaseInsensitiveComparer. – Joe Oct 2 '10 at 7:20

I would go against using OrderBy with a list because it's a LINQ extension method, therefore:

  • It wraps the list in an enumerable, then enumerates it and fills a new temporary list, then sorts this new list.
  • It wraps the sorted list inside another enumerable.
  • Then when you call ToList(), it iterates on it and fills another new list with the items.

In essence: it creates and fills 2 new lists and 2 enumerables in addition to the actual sorting. In comparison, List.Sort() sorts in place and create nothing so it's way more efficient.

My recommendation would be:

  • If you know the underlying type, use List.Sort() or Array.Sort(array)
  • If you don't know the underlying type, copy the List to a temporary array and sort it using Array.Sort(array) and return it.
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var sorted = myObj.OrderBy(x => x.marker);
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OrderBy definitely gets the job done, but I personally prefer the syntax of List.Sort because you can feed it a Comparison<T> delegate instead of having to write a class that implements IComparer<T>. We can accomplish that goal with an extension method, and if that's something you're interested in, check out SortExtensions:

http://blog.velir.com/index.php/2011/02/17/ilistt-sorting-a-better-way/

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