Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does there exist any asynchronous connectors to Mysql that can be used in C or C++? I'm looking for something that can be plugged into a reactor pattern written in Boost.Asio.

[Edit:] Running a synchronous connector in threads is not an option.

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

http://jan.kneschke.de/2008/9/9/async-mysql-queries-with-c-api http://forums.mysql.com/read.php?45,183339,183339 enjoy

share|improve this answer
1  
The blocking connect is a serious issue in this implementation, but nonetheless is seem to do what I originally requested. The drizzle project (launchpad.net/drizzle) is working on an async client that will be backwards compatible with Mysql (mentioned here: oddments.org/?p=20) –  Thomas Watnedal Oct 9 '08 at 8:05

I had a similar problem with a very different technologies: Twisted python (reactor-based IO) and sqlAlchemy (??). While searching for a solution, I found about an sAsync project that simply created a separate thread for sqlAlchemy and then responded to requests.

Given that ASIO is based on low level OS features (such as aio_read() or ReadFileEx() etc) and an OS-level reactor (or proactor, in Windows' case) I don't think you have another chance than emulating the 'asynchronousness' by similar means.

Running a synchronous connector in threads is not an option

Think about it: the libmysqlclient / mysqlclient.dll you're using makes synchronous socket calls. The OS scheduler will correctly switch to another thread until the I/O is finished, so what's the difference? (apart from the fact that you shouldn't make 2k threads for this..)

Edit: mysql_real_connect() supports an UNIX socket parameter. You can supposedly read yourself from the mysql server port and write to that UNIX socket only using ASIO. Like a proxyfication.

share|improve this answer

[ Running a synchronous connector in threads is not an option Think about it: the libmysqlclient / mysqlclient.dll you're using makes synchronous socket calls. The OS scheduler will correctly switch to another thread until the I/O is finished]

This is bugging me! - the 'another thread' could as easily be a second sync. connection to mysql, and should be handled by mysql just as it would another client altogether? My gutfeel is that it should work using multiple threads.

share|improve this answer
1  
It will work in threads. But lets say that you want to have 100 connections vs one or more servers. Not that I imagine that anyone would do that, but accept it for the sake of the argument. Should I then spin up 100 thread (or even only 10 in a thread pool..)? Thats a fairly large overhead. –  Thomas Watnedal Oct 2 '08 at 13:38

MySQL Connector/C++ is a C++ implementation of JDBC 4.0

The reference customers who use MySQL Connector/C++ are: - OpenOffice - MySQL Workbench

Learn more: http://forums.mysql.com/read.php?167,221298

share|improve this answer

There is a project called DBSlayer that puts another layer in front of MySQL that you talk to through JSON. http://code.nytimes.com/projects/dbslayer

share|improve this answer

have you considered using libdrizzle? i have used only an old version, from when it was a separate project from drizzle, and i tested the asynchronous query features, but i never did any actual benchmarks worth mentioning.

share|improve this answer
    
I did take a quick look at the Drizzle project when I created this question (See my comment to the accepted answer). At that time they had an async client under way. I don't really know how that ended up. –  Thomas Watnedal Jun 3 '11 at 8:12

I think the only solution will be to create an asynchronous service that wraps a standard connector. You'll need to understand the ODBC APIs though.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.