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How can I overload operator++ in two different ways (for a++ and ++a)?

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1  
Relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/3181211/… –  KennyTM Oct 2 '10 at 15:12

6 Answers 6

up vote 57 down vote accepted

Should look like this:

class Number 
{
    public:
        Number& operator++ ()     // prefix ++
        {
           // Do work on this.   (increment your object here)
           return *this;
        }

        // You want to make the ++ operator work like the standard operators
        // The simple way to do this is to implement postfix in terms of prefix.
        //
        Number  operator++ (int)  // postfix ++
        {
           Number result(*this);   // make a copy for result
           ++(*this);              // Now use the prefix version to do the work
           return result;          // return the copy (the old) value.
        }
}; 
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7  
This code also shows the prefix vs. postfix performance difference. If the object you are returning doesn't fit into a CPU register, then you are doing an expensive copy operation. This is fine if you need to use the pre-incremented value, but if you don't, postfix is much better. An example would be an iterator where you typically use: for(pos=c.begin(); ...; ++pos) {} instead of pos++ –  Eric Holmberg Oct 2 '10 at 16:28
12  
@Eric: You have it correct all the way through apart from a sentence in the middle where you mix. Its prefix that is better. –  Loki Astari Oct 2 '10 at 19:10
    
Ooops! Thanks for the correction! –  Eric Holmberg Oct 5 '10 at 1:23
1  
If all a postfix does is call ++ on a single member, and the type is constructable from that member's type, one can simplify postfix to Number operator++(int) {return Number(member++);} –  Mooing Duck Jul 9 '13 at 0:09
    
@MooingDuck: I still prefer the above method as it is DRY. All the code for incrementing is in one place (the prefix increment). Thus if you change behavior you only need to fix the code in one place rather than two. –  Loki Astari Jul 9 '13 at 18:16

The difference lies in what signature you choose for your overload(s) of operator ++.

Cited from the relevant article on this subject in the C++ FAQ (go there for more details):

class Number {
  public:
    Number& operator++ ();     // prefix ++: no parameter, returns a reference
    Number  operator++ (int);  // postfix ++: dummy parameter, returns a value
};

P.S.: When I found out about this, all I saw initially was the dummy parameter, but the different return types are actually more interesting; they might explain why ++x is considered more efficient than x++ in general.

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You have two ways to overload the two (prefix/postfix) ++ operators for a type T:

Object method:

This is the easiest way, using "common" OOP idiom.

class T
{
    public :
        T & operator++() // ++A
        {
            // Do increment of "this" value
            return *this ;
        }

        T operator++(int) // A++
        {
           T temp = *this ;
           // Do increment of "this" value
           return temp ;
        }
} ;

Object non-member function:

This is another way to do this: As long as the functions are in the same namespace as the object they are referring too, they will be considered when the compiler will search for a fonction to handle ++t ; or t++ ; code:

class T
{
    // etc.
} ;


T & operator++(T & p_oRight) // ++A
{
   // Do increment of p_oRight value
   return p_oRight ;
}

T operator++(T & p_oRight, int) // A++
{
   T oCopy ;
   // Copy p_oRight into oCopy
   // Do increment of p_oRight value
   return oCopy ;
}

It is important to remember that, from a C++ viewpoint (including a C++ compiler viewpoint), those non-member functions are still part of T's interface (as long as they are in the same namespace).

There are two potential advantages of the non-member function notation:

  • If you manage to code them without making them friend of T, then you increased the encapsulation of T
  • you can apply this even to classes or structures whose code you don't own. This is a non-intrusive way to enhance the interface of an object without modifying its declaration.
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Declare like so:

class A
{
public:
    A& operator++();    //Prefix (++a)
    A operator++(int); //Postfix (a++)

};

Implement properly - do not mess with what everyone knows they do (increment then use, use then increment).

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I would like to explain it with the help of an example

struct data
{ 
int i; 
};
data operator ++(data x)// pre increment
{
data t;
x.i=x.i+1;
t.i=x.i;
return t;
}
data operator ++ (data x, int ) // post increment ( A dummy int has been passed) 
{ 
data t;
t.i=x.i;
x.i =x.i+1;
return t;
}
void main ()
{
 data i={12}, a;
 a=i++;
 a=++i;
}
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