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I have the following code (example), and I'm really not comfortable with so many 'if' checks:

public enum Flags 
{
    p1 = 0x01,  // 0001
    p2 = 0x02,  // 0010  
    p3 = 0x04,  // 0100
    p4 = 0x08   // 1000
};      

public static void MyMethod (Flags flag)
{
    if ((flag & Flags.p1) == Flags.p1)
        DoSomething();

    if ((flag & Flags.p2) == Flags.p2)
        DosomethingElse();

    if ((flag & Flags.p3) == Flags.p3)
        DosomethingElseAgain();

    if ((flag & Flags.p4) == Flags.p4)
        DosomethingElseAgainAndAgain();
}

MyMethod(Flags.p1 | Flags.p3);

Is there some way, that i could use an 'switch' statement. Maybe if I convert them to strings, or use arrays?

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2  
A switch statement is not what you want because it's equivalent to a whole bunch of if ... else if ... else if ... statements, which is clearly not what you have. –  Gabe Oct 2 '10 at 18:25
4  
Note that in C# 4.0 you can use flag.HasFlag(Flags.p1) instead of flag & Flags.p1 == Flags.p1 –  Gabe Oct 2 '10 at 18:29
    
@Gabe: hivemind! –  Callum Rogers Oct 2 '10 at 18:36
    
I think the series of if checks is quite clear, as it describes exactly what you're doing. By separating the logic for each section into its own method, you've eliminated the noise that would obscure the top-level pattern, which is a series of conditional actions. –  Dan Bryant Oct 2 '10 at 18:58
    
Dan Bryant: For the most part you're right, but it's hard to look at it and know that all flags are represented and it's hard to make sure that a maintenance programmer won't come in and start trying to "optimize" it by inserting else s in there. –  Gabe Oct 2 '10 at 21:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Something like this?

public static void MyMethod(Flags flag)
{
    // Define action-lookup
    var actionsByFlag = new Dictionary<Flags, Action>
    {
        { Flags.p1, DoSomething},
        { Flags.p2, DosomethingElse},
        { Flags.p3, DosomethingElseAgain},
        { Flags.p4, DosomethingElseAgainAndAgain},
    };

    // Find applicable actions
    var actions = actionsByFlag.Where(kvp => (flag & kvp.Key) == kvp.Key)
                               .Select(kvp => kvp.Value);

    //Execute applicable actions
    foreach (var action in actions)
       action();
}

EDIT: If the order of actions are important, an OrderBy clause may be required.

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6  
In C# 4.0 you can use dict.Where(kv => flag.HasFlag(kv.Key)) –  Callum Rogers Oct 2 '10 at 18:30
    
I like that @Ani, Dictionary and LINQ. Thanks to @Gabe and @Callum Rogers for mentioning new C# 4.0 feature. –  kofucii Oct 2 '10 at 18:34
    
Good answer, but define action-lookup outside the method. –  Caspar Kleijne Oct 2 '10 at 18:35
    
Caspar: The action lookup may require state that's only available inside that method. If not, though, it should be defined outside the method. –  Gabe Oct 2 '10 at 18:43
    
@Callum Rogers: Thanks, that's a good point. –  Ani Oct 2 '10 at 18:51

Here's a variation on Ani's answer:

public static void MyMethod(Flags flag) 
{ 
    // Define action-lookup 
    var dict = new Dictionary<Flags, Action> 
    { 
        { Flags.p1, DoSomething}, 
        { Flags.p2, DosomethingElse}, 
        { Flags.p3, DosomethingElseAgain}, 
        { Flags.p4, DosomethingElseAgainAndAgain}, 
    }; 

    // Find applicable actions 
    var actions = from value in Enum.GetValues(typeof(Flags))
                  where flag.HasFlag(value)
                  select dict[value];

    //Execute applicable actions 
    foreach (var action in actions)
       action(); 
}

The important difference here is that it iterates over the defined values in the enumeration rather than the entries in the dictionary. That way if you add a new flag to the enum without adding it to the dictionary, you will get an exception when you try to use the new flag. And it always iterates in order of the flags.

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