Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given the code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
template <typename T>
T my_max (const T &t1, const T &t2)
{
    static int counter = 0;
    counter++;
    cout << counter << " ";
    return ((t1 > t2) ? t1 : t2);
}
int main()
{
    my_max (2,3);
    my_max (3.5, 4.3);
    my_max (3,2);
    my_max ('a','c');
}

The output is:

1 1 2 1

I understand that the static member is initialized only once. My question is how the compiler remembers what types called that generic function? What actually happens behind the scenes?

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 8 down vote accepted

What happens is that the compiler instantiate the function for every type(used one of course). So, you would have the following "functions" internally:

int my_max (const int &t1, const int &t2)
{
    static int counter = 0;
    counter++;
    cout << counter << " ";
    return ((t1 > t2) ? t1 : t2);
}
...
double my_max (const double &t1, const double &t2)
{
    static int counter = 0;
    counter++;
    cout << counter << " ";
    return ((t1 > t2) ? t1 : t2);
}
...
char my_max (const char &t1, const char &t2)
{
    static int counter = 0;
    counter++;
    cout << counter << " ";
    return ((t1 > t2) ? t1 : t2);
}

I think it is clear, that each function is an independent one. They share nothing, except that they are generated by the same template code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The compiler doesn't remember the types. It creates different functions for different types.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.