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I'm writing some software which will manage a few hundred small systems in “the field” over an intermittent 3G (or similar) connection.

Home base will need to send jobs to the systems in the field (eg, “report on your status”, “update your software”, etc), and the systems in the field will need to send jobs back to the server (eg, “a failure has been detected”, “here is some data”, etc).

I've spent some time looking at Celery and it seems to be a perfect fit: celeryd running at home base could collect jobs for the systems in the field, a celeryd running on the field systems could collect jobs for the server, and these jobs could be exchanged as clients become available.

So, is Celery a good fit for this problem? Specifically:

  • The majority of tasks will be directed to an individual worker (eg, “send the ‘get_status’ job to ‘system51’”) — will this be a problem?
  • Does it gracefully handle adverse network conditions (like, eg, connections dying)?
  • What functionality is only available if RabbitMQ is being used as a backend? (I'd rather not run RabbitMQ on the field systems)
  • Is there any other reason Celery could make my life difficult if I use it like I've described?

Thanks!

(it would be valid to suggest that Celery is overkill, but there are other reasons that it would make my life easier, so I would like to consider it)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The majority of tasks will be directed to an individual worker (eg, “send the ‘get_status’ job to ‘system51’”) — will this be a problem?

Not at all. Just create a queue for each worker, e.g. say each node listens to a round robin queue called default and each node has its own queue named after its node name:

(a)$ celeryd -n a.example.com -Q default,a.example.com
(b)$ celeryd -n b.example.com -Q default,b.example.com
(c)$ celeryd -n c.example.com -Q default,c.example.com

Routing a task directly to a node is simple:

$ get_status.apply_async(args, kwargs, queue="a.example.com")

or by configuration using a Router:

# Always route "app.get_status" to "a.example.com"
CELERY_ROUTES = {"app.get_status": {"queue": "a.example.com"}}

Does it gracefully handle adverse network conditions (like, eg, connections dying)?

The worker gracefully recovers from broker connection failures. (at least from RabbitMQ, I'm not sure about all the other backends, but this is easy to test and fix (you only need to add the related exceptions to a list)

For the client you can always retry sending the task if the connection is down, or you can set up HA with RabbitMQ: http://www.rabbitmq.com/pacemaker.html

What functionality is only available if RabbitMQ is being used as a backend? (I'd rather not run RabbitMQ on the field systems)

Remote control commands, and only "direct" exchanges are supported (not "topic" or "fanout"). But this will be supported in Kombu (http://github.com/ask/kombu).

I would seriously reconsider using RabbitMQ. Why do you think it's not a good fit? IMHO I wouldn't look elsewhere for a system like this, (except maybe ZeroMQ if the system is transient and you don't require message persistence).

Is there any other reason Celery could make my life difficult if I use it like I've described?

I can't think of anything from what you describe above. Since the concurrency model is multiprocessing it does require some memory (I'm working on adding support for thread pools and eventlet pools, which may help in some cases).

it would be valid to suggest that Celery is overkill, but there are other reasons that it would make my life easier, so I would like to consider it)

In that case I think you use the word overkill lightly. It really depends on how much code and tests you need to write without it. I think it's better to improve an already existing general solution, and in theory it sounds like it should work well for your application.

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Why do you think [RabbitMQ isn't] a good fit? Because my Erlang+RabbitMQ foo is weak, and it would be one more thing I'd need to build+configure+maintain on the field systems, but they will already have Python+SQLite on them. –  David Wolever Oct 3 '10 at 14:24
    
But this will be supported in Kombu (github.com/ask/kombu) cool — I'll check Kombu out. *In that case I think you use the word overkill lightly… * true — I mostly added that because one of my biggest pet peeves on StackOverflow is the “you're doing it wrong, you should do it this other way” answer. Awesome, thanks a lot for your help. –  David Wolever Oct 3 '10 at 14:38
2  
I promise you, RabbitMQ is really easy to set up and maintain. It's something that I install and then forget about. –  asksol Oct 5 '10 at 7:46
    
Kombu is working, but the kombu integration branch for celery is not update at the moment :( I'm currently working on getting 2.1 out the door (friday), then I will be merging the kombu branch for 2.2 –  asksol Oct 5 '10 at 7:47

I would probably set up a (django) web service to accept requests. The web service could do the job of validating requests and deflecting bad requests. Then celery can just do the work.

This would require the remote devices to poll the web service to see if their jobs were done though. That may or may not be appropriate, depending on what exactly you're doing.

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I'd considered that, but I'd rather avoid polling if possible; in some circumstances close-to-realtime communication would be very nice to have, and polling could get expensive if I'm paying by the KB for 3D data. –  David Wolever Oct 3 '10 at 1:04

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