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I'm trying to write my own Mergesort function in the same fashion as C's qsort function. If I were writing MergeSort for an array of known items, I wouldn't have a problem, but since I don't know what they'll be it's throwing me for a loop.

The specification given by my professor didn't want me to use a separate function for merging, so I'm writing that implementation inside the Mergesort function itself. That means I'll have the same information qsort() would have:

  • void* base - a pointer to the first element of the array to be sorted
  • size_t nel - the number of elements in the array
  • size_t width - the size of each element
  • int (*compar)( const void*, const void* ) - a function that tells you how to compare each element

The problem I'm having is with the Merge part. Every implementation I've seen has used a temporary array to store items while they're sorted. I'm not that used to working with void pointers, and the biggest obstacle I've found is moving through and assigning values into arrays. How would I find the value at the second index in the array pointed to by base? How could I assign a value from that array into a temporary array? How would I create that temporary array?

Would it work if I casted the void pointers to char, and just incremented them by the width? I'm not sure how assignment would work, though.

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You should remove the C++ tag. This whole approach to sorting is wrong in C++, because in C++ (unlike C), you can't necessarily use memcpy to copy an object knowing only its address and its size in bytes. –  Steve Jessop Oct 3 '10 at 2:00
    
@Steve: while it goes against the philosophy of C++ programming, I'd say using memcpy to move (not copy) an object is equally valid (or invalid) in both C and C++. It's certainly possible to create C structures which contain pointers into themselves, or for which the address of the structure itself might be significant. The C standard even mentions this issue with stdio: a FILE object's address may be significant and using a copy of it is explicitly mentioned as undefined behavior. –  R.. Oct 3 '10 at 2:12
    
@R: yes, fair point, it can be invalid in C too, and there are cases you could use it in C++. But C++ introduces many new ways for it to be invalid, and it's so typical for objects to have constructors and destructors, that this style of sort routine is no longer useful for general purposes. –  Steve Jessop Oct 3 '10 at 2:16
    
I am writing this program in C++. –  Alex Oct 3 '10 at 2:17
    
then your professor may be a very dangerous person. Hopefully you will soon be taught to implement a mergesort similar to std::sort, instead of one similar to qsort. If not, you've been taught some fundamentals about how memory works, which is fair enough, but basically left hanging as far as learning C++ is concerned. –  Steve Jessop Oct 3 '10 at 2:19
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2 Answers 2

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How would I find the value at the second index in the array pointed to by base?

Use (char *)base + (width*i). This will give you the address of the i-th element.

How could I assign a value from that array into a temporary array?

You just copy the data. for (int n=0;n<width;n++) { //copy one byte from }

How would I create the temporary array?

Something like:

c - void* tempArray = malloc(width*elementsNeeded);

c++ - void* tempArray = (void*) (new char[width*elementsNeeded]);

EDIT:

To explain copying data a little further, you need to do:

for (int n=0;n<width;n++) {
  adressTo[n] = addressFrom[n];
}
// This will copy the contents of pointer addressFrom to addressTo.
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I'm still a little confused about the copying data part. Could you explain further? –  Alex Oct 3 '10 at 2:57
    
sure. [need 15 character to post this comment] –  Alexander Rafferty Oct 3 '10 at 3:13
    
I meant how would it work since we're using void pointers, sorry. Would it be *( (char*)arrayTo + index*width + n ) = *( (char*)arrayFrom + index*width + n ) ? –  Alex Oct 3 '10 at 3:23
    
Yes, thats one way, but quicker: ((char*)arrayTo)[index*width+n] = ((char*)arrayFrom)[index*width+n];. Both equivalent, but I think the latter is clearer. Agree? –  Alexander Rafferty Oct 3 '10 at 3:31
    
Oh, and please upvote if you find this post useful :) –  Alexander Rafferty Oct 3 '10 at 3:32
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How would I find the value at the second index in the array pointed to by base? Would it work if I casted the void pointers to char, and just incremented them by the width?

Yes, that's right. The size of a char is defined by the standard to be 1, so the "width" you're given is, by definition, the size of each element in chars. So you can find the address as follows:

void *second_element_ptr = ((char*)base) + width;

You can't find the value, because you don't know its type and so you can't make sense of the memory it occupies. But that's OK, to sort objects in C with this interface you don't need to know their values: you need pointers to them, which you can pass to the comparator function, and you need to be able to copy objects around.

How could I assign a value from that array into a temporary array?

char temporary_array[width]; // this is a C99 VLA, you might want to 
                             // allocate the array differently
memcpy(temporary_array, second_element_ptr, width);

How would I create that temporary array?

Oh, I guess I took these questions in the wrong order. For a small array containing a single element, you could take a chance on a VLA. Or you could use malloc as follows:

// an array half the size of the input
// using char*, since unlike void* we can do arithmetic on it
char *big_temp_array = malloc(width * (nel + 1)/2);

Btw, gcc supports arithmetic on void* as a compiler extension, treating it like arithmetic on char*. Up to you to decide whether you can/will use this.

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