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at first i have a 2d array storing many numbers and then i used an array of hushtables to store pairs formed by the numbers of each row of the 2d array. for example in the first row of the 2d array, the numbers are 1 2 3 4 5 then the pairs should be 1,2 1,3 1,4 ,1,5 etc. the code for generating the pairs and store in hashtable is

     Hashtable [] table=new Hashtable [lineCounter];
    int [] pairCounter=new int[lineCounter];
    for(int i=0;i<lineCounter;i++)
  {
     table[i]=new Hashtable();
     for (int j=0;j<lineitem2[i]-1;j++)
     {
         for(int t=j+1;t<lineitem2[i];t++)
         {
             int firstnum=freItem[i][j];
             int secnum=freItem[i][t];
             String value=firstnum+":"+secnum;
             //System.out.println(firstnum+"``"+secnum);
             table[i].put(pairCounter[i],value);
             pairCounter[i]++;
             //System.out.println(i+":::"+table[i].get(firstnum));
         }
     }
 }

after stored each pair of everyline, I want to compare each pair in every to the other lines to find how many times this pair shows up, the code is

Hashtable resulttable=new Hashtable();
   int [] pairresult=new int [lineCounter];

   for(int i=0;i<lineCounter;i++)
   {
           //Set set1 = table[i].entrySet();
        //Iterator it1 = set1.iterator();
        Enumeration keys = table[i].keys();


       //for(int j=i+1;j<lineCounter;j++)
       //{


         while (keys.hasMoreElements())
             {
                int pairs=0;
               //Map.Entry entry1 = (Map.Entry) it1.next();
               int key = (Integer)keys.nextElement();
               String curvalue = (String)table[i].get( key );

               for(int j=i+1;j<lineCounter;j++)
               {

                 //Set set2 = table[j].entrySet();
                 //Iterator it2 = set2.iterator();
                 Enumeration keys2 = table[j].keys();

                 while (keys2.hasMoreElements())
                 {

                   //Map.Entry entry2 = (Map.Entry) it2.next();
                   //System.out.println(entry2.getKey() + " and " + entry2.getValue());
                   int key2 = (Integer)keys2.nextElement();
                   String curvalue2 = (String)table[j].get( key2 );
                   if(curvalue.equals(curvalue2))
                   {
                       pairs++;
                       table[j].remove(key2);
                   }
                 }

                 }
                if(pairs>=0.02*lineCounter)
                {
                  resulttable.put(curvalue,pairs);
                }







            }


   //    }


   }

but after ran it with the input file, I got the error:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.OutOfMemoryError: Java heap space at java.lang.StringBuilder.toString(StringBuilder.java:430)

is there anything wrong with my method of comparing the pairs? and why did I get that error please help thanks.

share|improve this question
    
The error just says you ran out of memory. I have not gone through your code, but does it work with smaller input data? Maybe there is an infinite loop in there? –  Thilo Oct 3 '10 at 4:28
    
yea it works for smaller input data –  starcaller Oct 3 '10 at 4:33
3  
First, Hashtable, Enumeration, and to an extent, arrays are from the previous millennium. Update to use HashMap, Iterator, and Collection. Second, post the whole listing so other people can compile it and the whole stack-trace. –  Malvolio Oct 3 '10 at 4:36
    
First, Hashtable, Enumeration, and to an extent, arrays are from the previous millennium. Update to use HashMap, Iterator, and Collection. –  Malvolio Oct 3 '10 at 4:36
2  
@Malvolio, for some reason there are many beginner questions here that reference Hashtable, Vector, and other outdated classes. There must be some old Java tutorials/books that people are still using. –  Steve Kuo Oct 3 '10 at 5:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Okay, suppose you have a Pair class as follows:

public class Pair {

    private final int value1;
    private final int value2;

    public Pair(int value1, int value2) {
        this.value1 = value1;
        this.value2 = value2;
    }

    public int value1() {
        return value1;
    }

    public int value2() {
        return value2;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        final int prime = 31;
        int result = 1;
        result = prime * result + value1;
        result = prime * result + value2;
        return result;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {
        if (this == obj)
            return true;
        if (obj == null)
            return false;
        if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
            return false;
        Pair other = (Pair) obj;
        if (value1 != other.value1)
            return false;
        if (value2 != other.value2)
            return false;
        return true;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return "(" + value1 + ", " + value2 + ")";
    }

}

Note that it's important to properly implement the equals(Object) and hashCode() methods if you expect instances of the Pair class to behave properly when used in hash-based data structures (for example: Hashtable, HashMap, HashSet, HashMultimap, HashMultiset).

Now, this code will read in a file (requires the Guava libraries):

    File file = ...;

    final Map<Pair, Collection<Integer>> lineNumbersByPair = new HashMap<Pair, Collection<Integer>>();

    /*
     * Step 1: Read in the lines, one by one.
     */
    Reader reader = new FileReader(file);
    try {
        BufferedReader bufferedReader = new BufferedReader(reader);
        try {
            String line;

            int lineNumber = 0;
            while ((line = bufferedReader.readLine()) != null) {
                lineNumber++;

                String[] tokens = line.split("\\s+");
                int[] values = new int[tokens.length];

                for (int i = 0; i < tokens.length; i++) {
                    values[i] = Integer.parseInt(tokens[i]);
                }

                for (int i = 0; i < values.length; i++) {
                    for (int j = i + 1; j < values.length; j++) {
                        Pair pair = new Pair(values[i], values[j]);

                        Collection<Integer> lineNumbers;
                        if (lineNumbersByPair.containsKey(pair)) {
                            lineNumbers = lineNumbersByPair.get(pair);
                        } else {
                            lineNumbers = new HashSet<Integer>();
                            lineNumbersByPair.put(pair, lineNumbers);
                        }
                        lineNumbers.add(lineNumber);
                    }
                }
            }
        } finally {
            bufferedReader.close();
        }
    } finally {
        reader.close();
    }

    /*
     * Step 2: Identify the unique pairs. Sort them according to how many lines they appear on (most number of lines to least number of lines).
     */
    List<Pair> pairs = new ArrayList<Pair>(lineNumbersByPair.keySet());
    Collections.sort(
            pairs,
            new Comparator<Pair>() {
                @Override
                public int compare(Pair pair1, Pair pair2) {
                    Integer count1 = lineNumbersByPair.get(pair1).size();
                    Integer count2 = lineNumbersByPair.get(pair2).size();
                    return count1.compareTo(count2);
                }
            }
        );
    Collections.reverse(pairs);

    /*
     * Step 3: Print the pairs and their line numbers.
     */
    for (Pair pair : pairs) {
        Collection<Integer> lineNumbers = lineNumbersByPair.get(pair);
        if (lineNumbers.size() > 1) {
            System.out.println(pair + " appears on the following lines: " + lineNumbers);
        }
    }

In a test, the code read in a file with 20,000 lines, each line containing 10 numbers ranging anywhere between 0 and 1000.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, but when I tried to compile the file, it threw an error on the syntax:final Multimap<Pair, Integer> lineNumbersByPair = HashMultimap.create(); said can't find symbol –  starcaller Oct 3 '10 at 23:10
    
That's because the program relies on the Guava libraries (as mentioned in the answer). The libraries can be obtained from here: code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/downloads/list Unzip the file and look for a file named guava-r07.jar. Include the JAR file when you compile the program. –  Adam Paynter Oct 3 '10 at 23:13
    
I downloaded it and the apache collection lib, and have already did import org.apache.commons.collections.BidiMap; import org.apache.commons.collections.Factory; import org.apache.commons.collections.MultiHashMap; import org.apache.commons.collections.MultiMap; import org.apache.commons.collections.bidimap.DualHashBidiMap; import org.apache.commons.collections.map.LazyMap; what else should I import, Thanks –  starcaller Oct 3 '10 at 23:19
    
@starcaller: Okay, I have revised my answer to no longer depend on the Guava libraries. It should compile using only the standard Java library now. –  Adam Paynter Oct 3 '10 at 23:21
    
It is amazing to use the collection to do the job, the time efficiency improved so much. Thanks so much –  starcaller Oct 3 '10 at 23:47

If your code works on a smaller data set, it might just be that the default 64Mb that the JVM uses is not enough, does it work when you pass -Xmx512m as argument to the Java command line?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I tried to pass -Xmx1024m and it worked, but the computing time is so long, it took 8mins to compute a file contains 211 lines of numbers. is there any other data structure or algorithm to do this? –  starcaller Oct 3 '10 at 18:22
    
@starcaller, you are creating a large dataset and compare derived information. You could also compare the source dataset and construct the difference dataset from this. This will take much less memory. –  rsp Oct 4 '10 at 8:04

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