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I would like to extend the Queue.PriorityQueue described here: http://docs.python.org/library/queue.html#Queue.PriorityQueue

The queue will hold work packages with a priority. Workers will get work packages and process them. I want to make the following additions:

  1. Workers have a priority too. When multiple workers are idle the one with the highest priority should process an incoming work package.

  2. Not every worker can process every work package, so a mechanism is needed that checks if work package type and worker capabilities have a match.

I am looking for hints, how this is best implemented (starting from scratch, extending PrioriyQueue or Queue, ...).

edit

Here is my first (untested) try. The basic idea is that all waiting threads will be notified. Then they all try to get a work item through _choose_worker(self, worker). (Made it community wiki)

edit

Works for some simple tests now...

edit Added a custom BaseManager and a local copy of the worker list in the _choose_worker function.

edit bug fix

import Queue
from Queue import Empty, Full
from time import time as _time
import heapq

class AdvancedQueue(Queue.PriorityQueue):

    # Initialize the queue representation
    def _init(self, _maxsize):
        self.queue = []
        self.worker = []

    def put(self, item, block=True, timeout=None):
        '''
        Put an item into the queue.

        If optional args 'block' is true and 'timeout' is None (the default),
        block if necessary until a free slot is available. If 'timeout' is
        a positive number, it blocks at most 'timeout' seconds and raises
        the Full exception if no free slot was available within that time.
        Otherwise ('block' is false), put an item on the queue if a free slot
        is immediately available, else raise the Full exception ('timeout'
        is ignored in that case).
        '''
        self.not_full.acquire()
        try:
            if self.maxsize > 0:
                if not block:
                    if self._qsize() == self.maxsize:
                        raise Full
                elif timeout is None:
                    while self._qsize() == self.maxsize:
                        self.not_full.wait()
                elif timeout < 0:
                    raise ValueError("'timeout' must be a positive number")
                else:
                    endtime = _time() + timeout
                    while self._qsize() == self.maxsize:
                        remaining = endtime - _time()
                        if remaining <= 0.0:
                            raise Full
                        self.not_full.wait(remaining)
            self._put(item)
            self.unfinished_tasks += 1
            self.not_empty.notifyAll()  # only change
        finally:
            self.not_full.release()

    def get(self, worker, block=True, timeout=None):
        self.not_empty.acquire()
        try:
            self._put_worker(worker)

            if not block:
                if not self._qsize():
                    raise Empty
                else:
                    return self._choose_worker(worker)
            elif timeout is None:
                while True:
                    while not self._qsize():
                        self.not_empty.wait()
                    try:
                        return self._choose_worker(worker)
                    except Empty:
                        self.not_empty.wait()

            elif timeout < 0:
                raise ValueError("'timeout' must be a positive number")
            else:
                endtime = _time() + timeout
                def wait(endtime):
                    remaining = endtime - _time()
                    if remaining <= 0.0:
                        raise Empty
                    self.not_empty.wait(remaining)

                while True:
                    while not self._qsize():
                        wait(endtime)

                    try:
                        return self._choose_worker(worker)
                    except Empty:
                        wait(endtime)
        finally:
            self._remove_worker(worker)
            self.not_empty.release()

    # Put a new worker in the worker queue
    def _put_worker(self, worker, heappush=heapq.heappush):
        heappush(self.worker, worker)

    # Remove a worker from the worker queue
    def _remove_worker(self, worker):
        self.worker.remove(worker)

    # Choose a matching worker with highest priority
    def _choose_worker(self, worker):
        worker_copy = self.worker[:]    # we need a copy so we can remove assigned worker
        for item in self.queue:
            for enqueued_worker in worker_copy:
                if item[1].type in enqueued_worker[1].capabilities:
                    if enqueued_worker == worker:
                        self.queue.remove(item)
                        self.not_full.notify()
                        return item
                    else:
                        worker_copy.remove(enqueued_worker)
                        # item will be taken by enqueued_worker (which has higher priority),
                        # so enqueued_worker is busy and can be removed
                        continue
        raise Empty
share|improve this question
1  
+1 interesting question. I have an idea but I'd like to see other answers first. I'm only going to give you a small hint for now: watch out for the case where there is a job free and two workers free, but the highest priority worker is unable to handle the job in the queue. Be careful that you don't go into deadlock. Similarly there is the case where you have two tasks and one worker and the worker is unable to handle the highest priority job, again watch out for deadlock. You should probably unit test these cases (and many more tests for other more common scenarios - empty queue, etc). –  Mark Byers Oct 3 '10 at 9:06
    
Great for me getting started with python unit tests :) –  tauran Oct 3 '10 at 9:26

2 Answers 2

I think you are describing a situation where you have two "priority queues" - one for the jobs and one for the workers. The naive approach is to take the top priority job and the top priority worker and try to pair them. But of course this fails when the worker is unable to execute the job.

To fix this I'd suggest first taking the top priority job and then iterating over all the workers in order of descending priority until you find one that can process that job. If none of the workers can process the job then take the second highest priority job, and so on. So effectively you have nested loops, something like this:

def getNextWorkerAndJobPair():
    for job in sorted(jobs, key=priority, reverse=True):
        for worker in sorted(workers, key=priority, reverse=True):
             if worker.can_process(job):
                 return (worker, job)

The above example sorts the data unnecessarily many times though. To avoid this it would be best to store the data already in sorted order. As for what data structures to use, I'm not really sure what the best is. Ideally you would want O(log n) inserts and removals and to be able to iterate over the collection in sorted order in O(n) time. I think PriorityQueue meets the first of those requirements but not the second. I imagine that sortedlist from the blist package would work, but I haven't tried it myself and the webpage isn't specific about the performance guarantees that this class offers.

The way I have suggested to iterate over the jobs first and then over the workers in the inner loop is not the only approach you could take. You could also reverse the order of the loops so that you choose the highest priority worker first and then try to find a job for it. Or you could find the valid (job, worker) pair that has the maximum value of f(priority_job, priority_worker) for some function f (for example just add the priorities).

share|improve this answer
    
For my edit I followed your approach. First I will try to get it working, then think about tweaking it. Also I want to reuse as much code as possible from PriorityQueue. –  tauran Oct 4 '10 at 11:49
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The only answer was useful but not detailed enough, so I will accept my own answer for now. See the code in the question.

share|improve this answer

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