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I'm stuck writing my program Here's what I wanted it to do:

  1. display a welcome message inside a console
  2. Wait for the user to imput a number from 0 to 9]
  3. compare that number to 0
  4. display a message if it is, else exit

Here is what I currently have:

.386
.model flat,stdcall
option casemap:none
include \masm32\include\windows.inc
include \masm32\include\kernel32.inc
includelib \masm32\lib\kernel32.lib
include \masm32\include\user32.inc
includelib \masm32\lib\user32.lib
include \masm32\include\masm32.inc
includelib \masm32\lib\masm32.lib

.data
capt db "SCHiM says: ",0
txt       db "Enter a number 0-9:",0

.data?

data db ?

.code

start:


call AllocConsole

push offset txt
call StdOut

push 1
push offset data
call StdIn

mov al, data

cmp al, 0h
jz eqzero

invoke ExitProcess, NULL

eqzero:

push offset capt
call StdOut
push offset data
call StdOut

endloop:
jmp endloop

invoke ExitProcess, NULL
end start 

The program assembles & links perfectly without any warnings or errors But cmp always returns 1, if I print the value in data (with StdOut) it shows me the exact value I've put in. So why isn't it working?

Thanks in advance

share|improve this question
    
What are StdIn and StdOut? Are they macros or functions from MASM distribution? I don't have any modern MASM distribution handy to check. –  atzz Oct 3 '10 at 13:53
    
I would suggest using NASM, it has a much clearer sintax. –  ruslik Oct 3 '10 at 13:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try this:

cmp al, '0'

-or-

cmp al, 48

Why? Because you are interested in character '0', not numeric 0. Character '0' is encoded as 48 in most encodings.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you!!, that worked #solved# –  Rick Oct 3 '10 at 13:52
    
@Rick Don't forget to accept answer. –  Jens Björnhager Oct 3 '10 at 13:56
    
@Jens Bjornhager, Done –  Rick Oct 3 '10 at 14:00

You are probably moving the address of data to al somehow. Try mov al, [data] to get the value stored at data.

share|improve this answer
    
No, in MASM the original notation is correct. –  atzz Oct 3 '10 at 13:45
    
Your solution has no effect, my program still doesn't take the jump I've also run it though ollydbg (a debugger) I see this line, somehow the value stored in al is 01 instead of 00 0040101B |. A0 30304000 MOV AL,BYTE PTR DS:[403030] ps: I'm sorry for the horrible format of my posts, I'm not used to the way stackoverflow wraps it's text –  Rick Oct 3 '10 at 13:45

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