Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two classes Base and Derived from it:

class Base{
public:
    Base(int = 0);
    Base(Base&);
    Base& operator=(const Base&);
protected:
    int protectedData;
private:
    int baseData;
};

/////////////DERIVED CLASS
class Derived: public Base{
public:
    Derived(int = 0);
    Derived(Derived&);
    Derived(Base&);
    Derived& operator=(const Derived&);
private:
    int derivedData;
};

implementation of the functions

///////////BASE FUNCTIONS
Base::Base(int value): protectedData(value), baseData(value)
{
    cout << "base C'tor" << endl;
}


Base::Base(Base& base)
{
    baseData = base.baseData;
    protectedData = base.protectedData;
    cout << "base Copy C'tor" << endl;
}

Base& Base::operator=(const Base& base)
{
    if(this == &base) return *this;
    baseData = base.baseData;
    protectedData = base.protectedData;
    cout << "Base::operator=" << endl;
    return *this;
}

///////////DERIVED FUNCTIONS

Derived::Derived(int value): Base(value), derivedData(value)
{
    cout << "derived C'tor" << endl;
}

Derived::Derived(Derived& derived)
    : Base(derived)
{
    derivedData = derived.derivedData;
    cout << "derived Copy C'tor" << endl;
}

Derived::Derived(Base& base)
    : Base(base), derivedData(0)
{
    cout << " Derived(Base&) is called " << endl;
}

Derived& Derived::operator=(const Derived& derived)
{
    if(this == &derived) return *this;

    derivedData = derived.derivedData;
    cout << "Derived::operator=" << endl;
    return *this;
}

With the following in my main:

Base base(1);
Derived derived1 = base;

the compiler gives me an error:

..\main.cpp:16: error: no matching function for call to `Derived::Derived(Derived)'
..\base.h:34: note: candidates are: Derived::Derived(Base&)
..\base.h:33: note:                 Derived::Derived(Derived&)
..\base.h:32: note:                 Derived::Derived(int)
..\main.cpp:16: error:   initializing temporary from result of `Derived::Derived(Base&)'

but when I have this in main:

Base base(1);
Derived derived1(base);

it works perfectly. Why?

EDITED

so ok thanks for everybody, I checked it with const and all works good, BUT I check also all calls and in both cases I receive:

base C'tor
base Copy C'tor
Derived(Base&)

my question is, why? You said that I actually call: Derived(Derived(Base&)) so I must have

base C'tor
base Copy C'tor
Derived(Base&)
Derived copy c'tor //<-note, why this one is missing?
share|improve this question
    
+1 for including all useful data in the question. please now accept an answer –  Markus Kull Oct 3 '10 at 14:52
    
Be careful, you aren't doing assignment of your base object in your derived assignment implementation. –  DumbCoder Oct 3 '10 at 15:08

6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Change these constructors

Base(Base&);
Derived(Derived&);
Derived(Base&);

To take const references:

Base(const Base&);
Derived(const Derived&);
Derived(const Base&);

The former cannot accept temporary values, the latter can. The compiler wants to convert

Derived derived1 = base;

into

Derived derived1(Derived(base));

but it can't because Derived(base) is a temporary value and there is no Derived constructor that can take a temporary Derived instance.

Edit:

Note that it is sometimes difficult to see what the compiler is actually doing by putting a bunch of cout calls in the constructors, because of copy elision. Copy elision allows the compiler in certain circumstances to eliminate copies, even if those copies have side effects (like printing output). There's a reasonably good discussion of this in Wikipedia. If you are using g++, you can add the --no-elide-constructors switch and you will see all the expected copies take place.

Also, this answer by litb to another related question has a lot of detailed discussion of the subtle differences between direct initialization and copy initialization. It's good reading!

share|improve this answer
    
I edited it, can You watch please? –  rookie Oct 3 '10 at 19:55

Try making copy constructors accept by const reference (as they should), and then it'll work. Reason:

Derived derived1 = base;

creates an rvalue (temporary object) of Derived from base using Derived::Derived(Base&), which then can't be passed to Derived::Derived(Derived&) because an rvalue can't be bound to a non-const reference.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for answer, I edited the question, can You see it please? –  rookie Oct 3 '10 at 19:55
    
@rookie That copy constructor was elided. The compiler is allowed to eliminate copies in certain cases, even if those copies would have side effects. You might want to look at my answer to another question here, where I go into details on copy elision, albeit there it's mostly about return values. –  usta Oct 5 '10 at 6:32

The solution will most likely be adding an assignmend operator to derived:

Derived& Derived::operator=(const Base& base);

Otherwise the compiler will try to build temporary instances of classes - which he informed you about!

Also, copy constructors are MyClass( const MyClass& instance), they should take const references as arguments.

hth

Mario

share|improve this answer
2  
There is no assignment in the code from above. It's just a copy-initialization. –  sellibitze Oct 3 '10 at 14:22
    
rats, thanks! I'm away from C++ too long already... –  Mario The Spoon Oct 3 '10 at 14:35

In the faulty code, you are performing an implicit cast: Derived derived1 = base; forces the compiled to cast the 'base' object of class 'Base' to be casted to derived.

However, It's never possible to cast a base class to a derived class, because the derived class might have additional data that doesn't exist in the base class. The other way round, things should work fine. It's important to realize that a cast is used here, and not the constructor.

The working version of the code doesn't have the problem. It's not performing a cast, it's just calling the Derived(Base&); constructor which has been defined in your code.

share|improve this answer

Copy constructor is meant to create an object1 which is a copy of another existing object2, when object1 is being created and both belong to the same class, hierarchy not involved.

Base base(1);
Derived derived1 = base;

What happens here is base isn't a Derived object. So a conversion constructor

Derived::Derived(Base& base)

is invoked which creates a Derived object from a Base object.

share|improve this answer

I think I understood, it is just optimization of my compiler, there is no need create copy of the derived object cause it is alreary created

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.