Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I haven't written any C++ in years and now I'm trying to get back into it. I then ran across this and thought about giving up:

typedef enum TokenType
{
    blah1   = 0x00000000,
    blah2   = 0X01000000,
    blah3   = 0X02000000
} TokenType;

What is this? Why is the typedef keyword used here? Why does the name TokenType appear twice in this declaration? How are the semantics different from this:

enum TokenType
{
    blah1 = 0x00000000,
    blah2=0x01000000,
    blah3=0x02000000
};
share|improve this question

In C, declaring your enum the first way allows you to use it like so:

TokenType my_type;

If you use the second style, you'll be forced to declare your variable like this:

enum TokenType my_type;

As mentioned by others, this doesn't make a difference in C++. My guess is that either the person who wrote this is a C programmer at heart, or you're compiling C code as C++. Either way, it won't affect the behaviour of your code.

share|improve this answer
8  
Your question is correct only for C, but not C++. In C++ enums and structs can be used directly as if there was a typedef. – David Rodríguez - dribeas Dec 21 '08 at 22:06
3  
Well, yes but this does answer the real question that was asked which was really about "what does this even mean?" – BobbyShaftoe Dec 21 '08 at 22:08
    
Good point, dribeas. – Ryan Fox Dec 21 '08 at 22:09
    
So is this technically a typedef or an enum? – Miek Mar 26 '12 at 17:14
2  
It's both. You could also say: enum TokenType_ { ... }; typedef enum TokenType_ TokenType; – Ryan Fox Mar 27 '12 at 16:25

It's a C heritage, in C, if you do :

enum TokenType
{
    blah1   = 0x00000000,
    blah2   = 0X01000000,
    blah3   = 0X02000000
};

you'll have to use it doing something like :

enum TokenType foo;

But if you do this :

typedef enum e_TokenType
{
    blah1   = 0x00000000,
    blah2   = 0X01000000,
    blah3   = 0X02000000
} TokenType;

You'll be able to declare :

TokenType foo;

But in C++, you can use only the former definition and use it as if it were in a C typedef.

share|improve this answer
1  
What you say is true in C. It is not true in C++. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 21 '08 at 22:32
30  
Isn't what I said in my last sentence ? – mat Dec 21 '08 at 22:37
    
@mat I upvoted your comment about the last sentence, but to be fair it is poorly worded and confusing. – A.R. Dec 13 '14 at 5:30

You do not need to do it. In C (not C++) you were required to use enum Enumname to refer to a data element of the enumerated type. To simplify it you were allowed to typedef it to a single name data type.

typedef enum MyEnum { 
  //...
} MyEnum;

allowed functions taking a parameter of the enum to be defined as

void f( MyEnum x )

instead of the longer

void f( enum MyEnum x )

Note that the name of the typename does not need to be equal to the name of the enum. The same happens with structs.

In C++, on the other hand, it is not required, as enums, classes and structs can be accessed directly as types by their names.

// C++
enum MyEnum {
   // ...
};
void f( MyEnum x ); // Correct C++, Error in C
share|improve this answer

Holdover from C.

share|improve this answer
    
Dunno that the 'early' qualifier is relevant; you would still write that in C if you wanted to use the type name without the enum prefix. – Jonathan Leffler Dec 21 '08 at 22:31
1  
true. I will delete it. I have not followed the C spec for a long long time. I was too lazy to check the c/c++ distinction... -1 for me. – Tim Dec 22 '08 at 0:09

In C, it is good style because you can change the type to something besides an enum.

typedef enum e_TokenType
{
    blah1   = 0x00000000,
    blah2   = 0X01000000,
    blah3   = 0X02000000
} TokenType;

foo(enum e_TokenType token);  /* this can only be passed as an enum */

foo(TokenType token); /* TokenType can be defined to something else later
                         without changing this declaration */

In C++ you can define the enum so that it will compile as C++ or C.

share|improve this answer

In some C codestyle guide the typedef version is said to be preferred for "clarity" and "simplicity" by some. I disagree, because the typedef obfuscates the real nature of the declared object. In fact, I don't use typedefs because when declaring a C variable I want to be clear about what the object actually is. This choice helps myself to remember faster what an old piece of code actually does, and will help others when maintaining the code in the future.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.