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Anyone know of a good implementation of a MultiValueDictionary? Basically, I want want something that allows multiple values per key. I want to be able to do something like

dict.Add(key, val);

And if the key doesn't already exist, it will add it, if it does, it will just add another value to that key. I'm just going to iterate over it, so I don't really care about the other retrieval methods.

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possible duplicate of dictionary-one-key-many-values? –  nawfal May 19 '14 at 12:31

8 Answers 8

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It doesn't exist, but you can build one pretty quickly from Dictionary and List:

class MultiDict<TKey, TValue>  // no (collection) base class
{
   private Dictionary<TKey, List<TValue>> _data =  new Dictionary<TKey,List<TValue>>();

   public void Add(TKey k, TValue v)
   {
      // can be a optimized a little with TryGetValue, this is for clarity
      if (_data.ContainsKey(k))
         _data[k].Add(v)
      else
        _data.Add(k, new List<TValue>() { v}) ;
   }

   // more members
}
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Lists don't have very efficient inserts, do they? Don't they use an array internally? –  Mark Oct 3 '10 at 18:23
    
Yes they use an array, and sometimes a List.Add() will need to re-allocate. But mostly Add is O(1). –  Henk Holterman Oct 3 '10 at 18:27
4  
@Mark: List<T>.Add has amortized O(1) performance, and is generally faster than LinkedList<T>.AddLast because it requires fewer operations. LinkedList<T>.AddLast might make sense if you want to never have an O(n) resize happen (even though it will happen rarely on a List<T> that you're only adding to). –  Dan Tao Oct 3 '10 at 18:31
4  
@Mark: Yes. I've seldom seen cases where it made sense to choose a LinkedList<T> over a List<T> when you're never inserting/removing from the middle (that's where LinkedList<T> really shines). When you're just adding to the end, LinkedList<T> is just costing you a lot more (e.g., creation of LinkedListNode<T> objects => more fields to initialize => elimination of arrays' performance advantage due to extremely optimized memory access) for very little benefit: one LinkedList<T>.AddLast in a blue moon will outperform a single List<T>.Add. The rest will be the opposite. –  Dan Tao Oct 3 '10 at 18:39
1  
List is also more cache friendly compared to linked list –  naiem Dec 6 '12 at 13:15

Just to add my $0.02 to the collection of solutions:

I had the same need back in 2011 and created a MultiDictionary with a pedantically complete implementation of all the .NET interfaces. That includes enumerators that return a standard KeyValuePair<K, T> and support for the IDictionary<K, T>.Values property providing a collection of actual values (instead of an ICollection<ICollection<T>>).

That way, it fits in neatly with the rest of the .NET collection classes. I also defined an IMultiDictionary<K, T> interface to access operations that are particular to this kind of dictionary:

public interface IMultiDictionary<TKey, TValue> :
  IDictionary<TKey, ICollection<TValue>>,
  IDictionary,
  ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>,
  IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>,
  IEnumerable {

  /// <summary>Adds a value into the dictionary</summary>
  /// <param name="key">Key the value will be stored under</param>
  /// <param name="value">Value that will be stored under the key</param>
  void Add(TKey key, TValue value);

  /// <summary>Determines the number of values stored under a key</summary>
  /// <param name="key">Key whose values will be counted</param>
  /// <returns>The number of values stored under the specified key</returns>
  int CountValues(TKey key);

  /// <summary>
  ///   Removes the item with the specified key and value from the dictionary
  /// </summary>
  /// <param name="key">Key of the item that will be removed</param>
  /// <param name="value">Value of the item that will be removed</param>
  /// <returns>True if the item was found and removed</returns>
  bool Remove(TKey key, TValue value);

  /// <summary>Removes all items of a key from the dictionary</summary>
  /// <param name="key">Key of the items that will be removed</param>
  /// <returns>The number of items that have been removed</returns>
  int RemoveKey(TKey key);

}

It can be compiled on anything from .NET 2.0 upwards and so far I've deployed it on the Xbox 360, Windows Phone 7, Linux and Unity 3D. There's also a complete unit test suite covering every single line of the code.

The code is licensed under the Common Public License (short: anything goes, but bug fixes to the library's code have to published) and can be found in my Subversion repository.

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Microsoft just added an official prelease version of exactly what you're looking for (called a MultiDictionary) available through NuGet here: https://www.nuget.org/packages/Microsoft.Experimental.Collections/

Info on usage and more details can be found through the official MSDN blog post here: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/archive/2014/06/20/would-you-like-a-multidictionary.aspx

I'm the developer for this package, so let me know either here or on MSDN if you have any questions about performance or anything.

Hope that helps.

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This answer needs to rise up. –  I3arnon Jun 21 '14 at 2:40
    
Is there a typo in your 2nd snippet? myDictionary.Add(2) -- don't you need to specify a key? –  Mark Jun 21 '14 at 3:44
1  
@Mark you are correct, there was an error in the second example, but it has since been fixed. Thanks for pointing it out :) –  Ian Hays Jun 23 '14 at 16:49

You could use MultiDictionary class from PowerCollections.

It returns ICollection{TValue} for the key asked.

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Here's one I wrote a while back that you can use.

It has a "MultiValueDictionary" class that inherits from Dictionary.

It also has an extension class that allows you to use the special Add functionality on any Dictionary where the value type is an IList; that way you're not forced to use the custom class if you don't want to.

public class MultiValueDictionary<KeyType, ValueType> : Dictionary<KeyType, List<ValueType>>
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Hide the regular Dictionary Add method
    /// </summary>
    new private void Add(KeyType key, List<ValueType> value)
    {            
        base.Add(key, value);
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Adds the specified value to the multi value dictionary.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key">The key of the element to add.</param>
    /// <param name="value">The value of the element to add. The value can be null for reference types.</param>
    public void Add(KeyType key, ValueType value)
    {
        //add the value to the dictionary under the key
        MultiValueDictionaryExtensions.Add(this, key, value);
    }
}

public static class MultiValueDictionaryExtensions
{
    /// <summary>
    /// Adds the specified value to the multi value dictionary.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="key">The key of the element to add.</param>
    /// <param name="value">The value of the element to add. The value can be null for reference types.</param>
    public static void Add<KeyType, ListType, ValueType>(this Dictionary<KeyType, ListType> thisDictionary, 
                                                         KeyType key, ValueType value)
    where ListType : IList<ValueType>, new()
    {
        //if the dictionary doesn't contain the key, make a new list under the key
        if (!thisDictionary.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            thisDictionary.Add(key, new ListType());
        }

        //add the value to the list at the key index
        thisDictionary[key].Add(value);
    }
}
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Of course... inherit from a dict with a list instead! Clever. What's that new() bit do? Don't think I've seen that before. –  Mark Oct 3 '10 at 18:28
    
Taken from MSDN; Use the new modifier to explicitly hide a member inherited from a base class. To hide an inherited member, declare it in the derived class using the same name, and modify it with the new modifier. –  Doctor Jones Oct 3 '10 at 18:30
1  
@DoctaJonez - I believe is he asking about the generic parameter constraint (the only new() in the code). @Mark - it is a generic parameter constraint requiring the passed in generic type to have a public parameterless constructor. –  Oded Oct 3 '10 at 18:32
    
@Oded: Ah of course, doh! –  Doctor Jones Oct 3 '10 at 18:34
1  
@DoctaJonez: I think @Mark means your where ListType : new() constraint. (@Mark: That means ListType must have a public parameterless constructor. Also, I'm surprised you would like this answer which hides the base.Add method as it seems you disliked that very aspect of Oded's answer.) –  Dan Tao Oct 3 '10 at 18:35

This ought to do for now...

public class MultiValueDictionary<TKey, TValue> : IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>
{
    private Dictionary<TKey, LinkedList<TValue>> _dict = new Dictionary<TKey, LinkedList<TValue>>();

    public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        if(!_dict.ContainsKey(key)) _dict[key] = new LinkedList<TValue>();
        _dict[key].AddLast(value);
    }

    public IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> GetEnumerator()
    {
        foreach (var list in _dict)
            foreach (var value in list.Value)
                yield return new KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>(list.Key, value);
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return GetEnumerator();
    }
}
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Why the (awkward) LinkedList? –  Henk Holterman Oct 3 '10 at 18:24
    
I agree with this and Henk's ideas. Personally I don't like the idea of inheriting from Dictionary<TKey, List<TValue>> (or similar) as I think it exposes too much (calling code could add/remove from the List<T> value directly, for example). –  Dan Tao Oct 3 '10 at 18:27
    
@Henk: Because I thought it would be more efficient than a List (see discussion under your answer). @Dan: Yeah... I was going to implement IDictionary instead, but even that.. some of the methods don't make sense. –  Mark Oct 3 '10 at 18:58
    
Yes, I saw the discussion. I thought as much, the mere presence of LinkedList can be a bit misleading. It is used rarely. –  Henk Holterman Oct 3 '10 at 19:16

You can always use a Tuple for your second generic parameter:

var dict = new Dictionary<string,Tuple<string,int,object>>();
dict.Add("key", new Tuple<string,int,object>("string1", 4, new Object()));

Or even , a generic List as a second generic parameter:

var dict = new Dictionary<string,List<myType>>();

That will allow you to bind multiple values to a single key.

For ease of use, you can create an extension method that will check for existence of a key and addition to the list.

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Yeah, but then I have to check if the key exists before adding to it every time. I want the collection class to handle that automatically. –  Mark Oct 3 '10 at 18:13
    
You can inherit from Dictionary, overriding add to do this check. It is not resource intensive, as checking for a key is pretty quick. Don't optimize before you need to. –  Oded Oct 3 '10 at 18:15
    
No one said anything about optimization, this is just about convenience. And if I inherit from dictionary, I'm pretty sure I would have to new the Add method, not override which I generally don't like to do because it breaks inheritance. Also, the method signatures need to be slightly different, because some them should actually return lists of TValues, rather than just a TValue. Lastly, I'm not really sure why you've suggested a Tuple.. those aren't expandable? –  Mark Oct 3 '10 at 18:22
    
@Mark - You say "multiple values for key". It wasn't clear that the values need to be expandable. See my update, regarding the second generic type being a List. –  Oded Oct 3 '10 at 18:24
    
@Oded: That's why I wrote the paragraph below ;) "it will just add another value to that key" re: update: An extension method is a clever solution... I wanted the enumerator to return KeyValuePairs though, not Key,List<Value> pairs though. –  Mark Oct 3 '10 at 18:31

You can easily make one from a dictionary of lists:

public class MultiValueDictionary<Key, Value> : Dictionary<Key, List<Value>> {

  public void Add(Key key, Value value) {
    List<Value> values;
    if (!this.TryGetValue(key, out values)) {
      values = new List<Value>();
      this.Add(key, values);
    }
    values.Add(value);
  }

}
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