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I just found a bug that, strangely, occurred only when optimization was turned on (g++ -O2). It was an Arithmetic exception in the following code, when interval was set to zero (from a command line argument):

for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
  if((i + 1) % interval == 0) { // exception here
    DoSomething();
  }
}

It's obvious that modulo zero operation threw a division-by-zero exception, but why did this only occur when the code was compiled with optimization turned on?

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I suggest you look at the assembly output and see if they all perform the division. Also, what compiler? g++? –  Kizaru Oct 4 '10 at 1:59
1  
The odd thing is not that the optimized version is throwing an exception, it's that the non-optimized version isn't. What does it do instead, call the result 0? Or !0? –  egrunin Oct 4 '10 at 2:13
1  
Care to share the full program, compiler version and compiler switches? I can't replicate the behavior you're seeing on g++ 4.0.1/OSX. I get a "Floating point exception" every time on both the optimized and unoptimized versions. –  Oren Trutner Oct 4 '10 at 2:14
    
@egrunin: It was not null. –  Frank Oct 4 '10 at 23:22
    
@Oren: I did try to reduce the code to just the for loop and the if statement, as a minimal example, but that changes things. On that one, optimized and non-optimized versions behave the same, and now they throw a Floating point exception. (In the full code version, it is Arithmetic exception in the optimized version). So it's hard to reproduce or share ... –  Frank Oct 4 '10 at 23:25

4 Answers 4

Divide by zero is always undefined behavior. The fact that you get different results with different optimization settings still fits within the definition of undefined behavior.

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Okay, but I'd like to know more. Why is it that the optimized version actually threw an exception, and the non-optimized version didn't seem to care at all? –  Frank Oct 4 '10 at 1:57
    
Try this is GCC, try compiling with the -S option, to get assembly language output, and then compare the differences. –  SingleNegationElimination Oct 4 '10 at 2:13
    
The language spec is not the final authority on what the CPU does. It's fair to say the language requires the operation to be performed, and only the result is UB, and it's fair to say the microarchitecture guides say how to implement the operation, and that the ISA spec says these operands to this operation raise an exception. So, there's still a story to be told. –  Potatoswatter Oct 4 '10 at 4:00
1  
The language doesn't specify that the divide by zero must occur. Undefined behavior means that, for example, a compiler may emit machine code for input that would result in a divide by zero that causes all of the data on your hard drive to be erased and replaced with animated gifs of ponies, and still be in perfect compliance with the standard. Undefined behavior means that the language does not define the behavior, at any point in the lifecycle of such input. See also (foxtrotters.tripod.com/icelnd.gif) –  SingleNegationElimination Oct 4 '10 at 4:07
1  
@AndreyT: You statement does not make sense. "Throwing an exception" is a subset of "Undefined Behavior". You can't refute user60628 specific observation based on the general knowledge that UB should occur. –  MSalters Oct 4 '10 at 9:45

You don't show us where 'interval' gets set. The optimizer may be doing something that sets 'interval' to 0. Change your code to

for(int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
  if (0==interval) { break; }
  if((i + 1) % interval == 0) { // exception here
    DoSomething();
  }
}

And see if you still get the error. Or better yet, show us where 'interval' is getting its value.

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interval is a const int that is set early in the program, from reading the command line arguments. So it is basically set to zero from the command line. –  Frank Oct 4 '10 at 2:01
    
error: assignment of read-only variable 'interval' –  dwelch Oct 4 '10 at 5:08
    
@dwelch: You're a bad compiler if you throw an assignment error on const int interval = x; –  Frank Oct 4 '10 at 23:03
    
@user60628: Bad compiler! No biscuit! –  Jon Purdy Oct 7 '10 at 17:14

Constant folding.

You declared interval as a global const int and compiler took you at your word.

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What do you mean? Note that the compiler cannot know if interval will be zero or not since I set it depending on a command line switch. –  Frank Oct 4 '10 at 2:21
    
please check the difference between const int and Integral Constant Expressions. Not every const int is an ICE. –  MSalters Oct 4 '10 at 9:47
    
He said it was a "const int" in another comment. A const int in the same source file is allowed to be an Integral Constant Expression. –  Joshua Oct 4 '10 at 15:11

Can you provide an example that demonstrates the problem? If optimization changes the results then you need to disassemble the code and compare the difference. What is your target platform? x86, arm, ppc? operating system? etc?

#include 
const int interval=BOB;
int main ( void )
{
    int i,n;
    n=10;
    for(i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        if((i + 1) % interval == 0)
        { // exception here
            printf("%d\n",i);
        }
    }
    return(0);
}
gcc interval.c -DBOB=0 -O2 -o interval
interval.c: In function ‘main’:
interval.c:15: warning: division by zero

Compiler figured it out...

EDIT:

If you try to assign it from a command line argument you should get a compiler error as a result there isnt anything to execute.

#include <stdio.h>
const int interval;
int main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
    int i,n;
    if(argc<2) return(1);
    interval=atoi(argv[1]);

    n=10;
    for(i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        if((i + 1) % interval == 0)
        { // exception here
            printf("%d\n",i);
        }
    }
    return(0);
}
gcc -o interval interval.c
interval.c: In function ‘main’:
interval.c:7: error: assignment of read-only variable ‘interval’

Please provide a complete example.

It is quite possible that using const and getting the compiler to work means the variable is being pulled from the wrong address and getting whatever happens to be there which may or may not be zero depending on what that address is and all the rest of your code. changing the optimization settings moves where that address is or what it points to or what it is changed to during execution up to that point changing the results.

EDIT:

#include <stdio.h>
int main ( int argc, char *argv[] )
{
const int interval;
    int i,n;
    if(argc<2) return(1);
    interval=atoi(argv[1]);

    n=10;
    for(i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        if((i + 1) % interval == 0)
        { // exception here
            printf("%d\n",i);
        }
    }
    return(0);
}

gcc -c interval.c 
interval.c: In function ‘main’:
interval.c:7: error: assignment of read-only variable ‘interval’

The compiler still knows that it is a read-only variable, using the address to point a non-const variable at it does not change its read-only state, just gets rid of the compiler error and still fails in the long run. As designed if for example .text is placed in read-only memory (rom/flash) then no matter how many addressing and pointer games you play you wont be able to change it run time, until you remove const and make it a read/write variable. Pointer manipulation like that is a cardinal sin anyway because it can and will eventually fail if/when you optimize (if when you use a really good compiler and not necessarily gcc, although it fails on gcc as well)(99.999999999999% of the time it is luck that it works, but very explainable when it fails and points to the software design not the compiler or language). Unless the const is the root cause of this question, just remove the const and give us a complete example that demonstrates the problem. Within an afternoon or day this could be closed.

EDIT 2:

unsigned int fun  ( unsigned int a )
{
    const unsigned int b = 7;
    *(unsigned int *)&b = 5;
    return(a+b);
}

compile the above with optimization and you get:

    .global fun
fun:
    add r0, r0, #7
    bx  lr

as expected, the const makes b read only. without the const:

unsigned int fun  ( unsigned int a )
{
    unsigned int b = 7;
    *(unsigned int *)&b = 5;
    return(a+b);
}
    .global fun
fun:
    add r0, r0, #5
    bx  lr

Which I am surprised by but never-the-less demonstrates how const works.

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No no, the interval value wasn't set that way using -D, it was set by parsing and processing the program runtime arguments. –  Frank Oct 4 '10 at 23:04
    
if you declare a variable const then you cannot change it in the program, your compiler should give you a warning telling you that it is wrong for example: error: assignment of read-only variable 'interval', you need to post a complete example, without such mistakes for us to work out the real problem. –  dwelch Oct 5 '10 at 2:26
    
You can change the value with this code: *(int *)&const_int_var = 0; Don't do that for globals: the compiler is allowed to place global const variables in readonly memory. –  Joshua Oct 7 '10 at 15:52

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