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The canonical Array difference example in Ruby is:

[ 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5 ] - [ 1, 2, 4 ]  #=>  [ 3, 3, 5 ]

What's the best way to get the following behavior instead?

[ 1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 3, 4, 5 ].subtract_once([ 1, 2, 4 ])  #=>  [ 1, 2, 3, 3, 5 ]

That is, only the first instance of each matching item in the second array is removed from the first array.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Subtract values as many times as they appear in the other array, or any Enumerable:

class Array
  # Subtract each passed value once:
  #   %w(1 2 3 1).subtract_once %w(1 1 2) # => ["2", "3"]
  # Time complexity of O(n + m)
  def subtract_once(values)
    counts = values.inject(Hash.new(0)) { |h, v| h[v] += 1; h }
    reject { |e| counts[e] -= 1 unless counts[e].zero? }
  end

Subtract each unique value once:

require 'set'
class Array
  # Subtract each unique value once:
  #   %w(1 2 2).subtract_once_uniq %w(1 2 2) # => [2]
  # Time complexity of O((n + m) * log m)
  def subtract_once_uniq(values)
    # note that set is implemented 
    values_set = Set.new values.to_a 
    reject { |e| values_set.delete(e) if values_set.include?(e) }
  end
end
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1  
I'm going to accept this but it would be nice if the argument could contain duplicate values which get applied in turn (they get squashed by the conversion to Set). Not sure how you can keep the duplicates while still keeping performance. (Also I wanted to accept an array and not values as separate arguments, but that's an easy change) –  Tom Shaw Oct 4 '10 at 5:22
    
I've updated the answer with a version that applies dupes as many times as they are present in the other array. –  glebm Jul 20 at 1:10
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class Array
  def subtract_once(b)
    h = b.inject({}) {|memo, v|
      memo[v] ||= 0; memo[v] += 1; memo
    }
    reject { |e| h.include?(e) && (h[e] -= 1) >= 0 }
  end
end

I believe this does what I want. Many thanks to @glebm

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Didn't see this one -- it's good. –  glebm Oct 4 '10 at 11:40
1  
Suggestions: Inside of inject: memo[v] ||= 0; memo[v] += 1; memo Inside of reject: h.include?(e) && !(h[e] -= 1).zero? –  glebm Oct 4 '10 at 11:42
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This is all I can think of so far:

[1, 2, 4].each { |x| ary.delete_at ary.index(x) }
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That might get a bit slow if m (the size of [1,2,4]) is big –  glebm Oct 4 '10 at 4:49
    
This solution only works if every element of the [1,2,4] array is present in ary. Otherwise the index of the element is nil. Inside could be something like: i = ary.index(x); ary.delete_at(i) if i –  Matt Sanders Feb 12 at 18:52
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Similar to @Jeremy Ruten's answer but accounting for the fact that some elements may not be present:

# remove each element of y from x exactly once
def array_difference(x, y)
  ret = x.dup
  y.each do |element|
    if index = ret.index(element)
      ret.delete_at(index)
    end
  end
  ret
end

This answer also won't modify the original array as it operates, so:

x = [1,2,3]
y = [3,4,5]
z = array_difference(x, y) # => [1,2]
x == [1,2,3]               # => [1,2,3]
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