Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a way to convert numbers to string format, dropping any redundant '.0'

The input data is a mix of floats and strings. Desired output:

0 --> '0'

0.0 --> '0'

0.1 --> '0.1'

1.0 --> '1'

I've come up with the following generator expression, but I wonder if there's a faster way:

(str(i).rstrip('.0') if i else '0' for i in lst)

The truth check is there to prevent 0 from becoming an empty string.

EDIT: The more or less acceptable solution I have for now is this:

('%d'%i if i == int(i) else '%s'%i for i in lst)

It just seems strange that there is no elegant way to handle this (fairly straightforward) case in python.

share|improve this question
    
hash() seems to be a little faster than int(), so you might use hash(i)==i, I'm not sure it's safe though –  ilius Aug 22 '13 at 19:18

13 Answers 13

up vote 5 down vote accepted
(str(i)[-2:] == '.0' and str(i)[:-2] or str(i) for i in ...)
share|improve this answer

rstrip doesn't do what you want it to do, it strips any of the characters you give it and not a suffix:

>>> '30000.0'.rstrip('.0')
'3'

Actually, just '%g' % i will do what you want. EDIT: as Robert pointed out in his comment this won't work for large numbers since it uses the default precision of %g which is 6 significant digits.

Since str(i) uses 12 significant digits, I think this will work:

>>> numbers = [ 0.0, 1.0, 0.1, 123456.7 ]
>>> ['%.12g' % n for n in numbers]
['1', '0', '0.1', '123456.7']
share|improve this answer
1  
%g is not the right way to accomplish this: >>> "%g" % 123456.7 # => '123457'. –  Robert Gamble Dec 22 '08 at 3:21
    
So I need to replace rstrip('.0') with rstrip('0').rstrip('.'), which I think will be very slow. There are more pitfalls with the '%g' operator: >>> "%.20g" % 123456.7 # ==> '123456.69999999999709' –  Algorias Dec 23 '08 at 2:03
    
@Algorias: not really a pitfall, you're getting the value of the best representation of 123456.7 as a Python double. To get the same as str(x), use "%.12g". –  dF. Dec 26 '08 at 18:16

See PEP 3101:

'g' - General format. This prints the number as a fixed-point
      number, unless the number is too large, in which case
      it switches to 'e' exponent notation.

Old style:

>>> "%g" % float(10)
'10'

New style (recommended):

>>> '{0:g}'.format(float(21))
'21'
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Seems like this does exactly what the OP wanted: elegantly strip superfluous trailing .0 off of integers but don't round, truncate or otherwise munge floating point numbers. And with a bonus of also automagically switching to exponent notation for large numbers! –  Noah Sussman Oct 21 '12 at 4:53
1  
@NoahSussman: '%g' may loose precision as shown in dF's answer from 2008. –  J.F. Sebastian Jun 6 '13 at 2:37
def floatstrip(x):
    if x == int(x):
        return str(int(x))
    else:
        return str(x)

Be aware, though, that Python represents 0.1 as an imprecise float, on my system 0.10000000000000001 .

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I might end up using the int check, though i would have preferred avoiding it. –  Algorias Dec 23 '08 at 2:05
from decimal import Decimal
'%g' % (Decimal(str(x)))
share|improve this answer
    
This will yield 123457 for 123456.7 which I don't think is what the OP wants. –  Robert Gamble Dec 22 '08 at 4:12

To print a float that has an integer value as an int:

format = "%d" if f.is_integer() else "%s"
print(format % f)

Example

             0.0 -> 0
             0.1 -> 0.1
            10.0 -> 10
      12345678.9 -> 12345678.9
     123456789.0 -> 123456789
12345678912345.0 -> 12345678912345
12345678912345.6 -> 1.23456789123e+13
  1.000000000001 -> 1.0
share|improve this answer

So much ugliness out there…

My personal favorite is to convert floats that don't require to be a float (= when they actually are integers) to int, thus removing the, now useless, trailing 0

(int(i) if i.is_integer() else i for i in lst)

Then you can print them normally.

share|improve this answer

If you only care about 1 decimal place of precision (as in your examples), you can just do:

("%.1f" % i).replace(".0", "")

This will convert the number to a string with 1 decimal place and then remove it if it is a zero:

>>> ("%.1f" % 0).replace(".0", "")
'0'
>>> ("%.1f" % 0.0).replace(".0", "")
'0'
>>> ("%.1f" % 0.1).replace(".0", "")
'0.1'
>>> ("%.1f" % 1.0).replace(".0", "")
'1'
>>> ("%.1f" % 3000.0).replace(".0", "")
'3000'
>>> ("%.1f" % 1.0000001).replace(".0", "")
'1'
share|improve this answer
    
Why the down-vote for this? –  Robert Gamble Dec 22 '08 at 19:23
    
Sorry I didn't make it clear, I need to keep precision beyond 1 digit. –  Algorias Dec 23 '08 at 1:28
3  
Nice. Down-vote someone for your lack of clarity. –  Matthew Schinckel Dec 30 '08 at 11:10
>>> x = '1.0'
>>> int(float(x))
1
>>> x = 1
>>> int(float(x))
1
share|improve this answer
str(x)[-2:] == '.0' and int(x) or x
share|improve this answer
>>> '%g' % 0
'0'
>>> '%g' % 0.0
'0'
>>> '%g' % 0.1
'0.1'
>>> '%g' % 1.0
'1'
share|improve this answer
    
>>> "%g" % 123456.7 # => '123457'. –  Robert Gamble Dec 22 '08 at 3:22
    
>>> "%g" % 1234567.7 => '1.23457e+06' –  Aaron Maenpaa Dec 26 '08 at 21:04

Using Python's string formatting (use str.format() with Python 3.0):

from decimal import Decimal

def format_number(i):
    return '%g' % (Decimal(str(i)))
share|improve this answer
    
You would better use Decimal(str(i)), or you will end up with an exception if i is a float. –  Federico A. Ramponi Dec 22 '08 at 2:22

Us the 0 prcision and add a period if you want one. EG "%.0f."

>>> print "%.0f."%1.0
1.
>>>
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't do what the OP asked for: "%.0f." % 0.1 # => 0., instead of 0.1. –  Robert Gamble Dec 22 '08 at 3:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.