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Is there any way to make a case condition in a switch statement where you say if a string begins with something?

ex

Switch (mystring)
{
   case("abc")://String begins with abc (abcd or abc1 or abcz or abc.. or abc will fall in this condition).
      //Do Something
      break;
   default:
      break;
}

UPDATE Other strings can be different length.

abc..

abczyv

dcs2.

qwerty

as...k

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Are your switch cases all going to be the same length? e.g. ABC, XYZ –  Paddy Oct 4 '10 at 8:39
    
@Paddy:No, they can be different length.Thanks. –  Amra Oct 4 '10 at 8:40

7 Answers 7

up vote 16 down vote accepted

If you knew that the length of conditions you would care about would all be the same length then you could:

switch(mystring.substring(0, Math.Min(3, mystring.Length))
{
  case "abc":
    //do something
    break;
  case "xyz":
    //do something else
    break;
  default:
    //do a different thing
    break;
}

The Math.Min(3, mystring.Length) is there so that a string of less than 3 characters won't throw an exception on the sub-string operation.

There are extensions of this technique to match e.g. a bunch of 2-char strings and a bunch of 3-char strings, where some 2-char comparisons matching are then followed by 3-char comparisons. Unless you've a very large number of such strings though, it quickly becomes less efficient than simple if-else chaining for both the running code and the person who has to maintain it.

Edit: Added since you've now stated they will be of different lengths. You could do the pattern I mentioned of checking the first X chars and then the next Y chars and so on, but unless there's a pattern where most of the strings are the same length this will be both inefficient and horrible to maintain (a classic case of premature pessimisation).

The command pattern is mentioned in another answer, so I won't give details of that, as is that where you map string patterns to IDs, but they are option.

I would not change from if-else chains to command or mapping patterns to gain the efficiency switch sometimes has over if-else, as you lose more in the comparisons for the command or obtaining the ID pattern. I would though do so if it made code clearer.

A chain of if-else's can work pretty well, either with string comparisons or with regular expressions (the latter if you have comparisons more complicated than the prefix-matches so far, which would probably be simpler and faster, I'm mentioning reg-ex's just because they do sometimes work well with more general cases of this sort of pattern).

If you go for if-elses, try to consider which cases are going to happen most often, and make those tests happen before those for less-common cases (though of course if "starts with abcd" is a case to look for it would have to be checked before "starts with abc").

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1  
Math.Min(3, mystring.Length) nice touch, didn't know of that +1 –  Naeem Sarfraz Oct 4 '10 at 8:48

Short answer: No.

The switch statement takes an expression that is only evaluated once. Based on the result, another piece of code is executed.

So what? => String.StartsWith is a function. Together with a given parameter, it is an expression. However, for your case you need to pass a different parameter for each case, so it cannot be evaluated only once.

Long answer #1 has been given by others.

Long answer #2:

Depending on what you're trying to achieve, you might be interested in the Command Pattern/Chain-of-responsibility pattern. Applied to your case, each piece of code would be represented by an implementation of a Command. In addition to the execute method, the command can provide a boolean Accept method, which checks whether the given string starts with the respective parameter.

Advantage: Instead of your hardcoded switch statement, hardcoded StartsWith evaluations and hardcoded strings, you'd have lot more flexibility.

The example you gave in your question would then look like this:

var commandList = new List<Command>() { new MyABCCommand() };

foreach (Command c in commandList)
{
    if (c.Accept(mystring))
    {
        c.Execute(mystring);
        break;
    }
}

class MyABCCommand : Command
{
    override bool Accept(string mystring)
    {
        return mystring.StartsWith("abc");
    }
}    
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If all the cases have the same length you can use
switch (mystring.SubString(0,Math.Min(len, mystring.Length))).
Another option is to have a function that will return categoryId based on the string and switch on the id.

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If the problem domain has some kind of string header concept, this could be modelled as an enum.

switch(GetStringHeader(s))
{
    case StringHeader.ABC: ...
    case StringHeader.QWERTY: ...
    ...
}

StringHeader GetStringHeader(string s)
{
    if (s.StartsWith("ABC")) return StringHeader.ABC;
    ...
}

enum StringHeader { ABC, QWERTY, ... }
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In addition to substring answer, you can do it as mystring.SubString(0,3) and check in case statement if its "abc".

But before the switch statement you need to ensure that your mystring is atleast 3 in length.

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This was quite a good read about switch statements... may be worth a read if you people are interested.

http://bartdesmet.net/blogs/bart/archive/2008/03/30/a-functional-c-type-switch.aspx

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Try this and tell my if it works hope it help you:

string value = Convert.ToString(Console.ReadLine());

Switch(value)
{
    Case "abc":

    break;

    default:

    break;
}       
share|improve this answer
    
why I was downvoted??? –  Amaterasu Hiro May 17 '13 at 23:16
1  
Your answer won't work, a basic C# case statement is what you've shown. This matches the whole string, not the starting portion (which the question asks for). –  wonea Nov 21 '13 at 11:12

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