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I am getting this error when I am trying to upload a video in my site.

Can you tell me how to fix this?

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12 Answers 12

up vote 980 down vote accepted

If you are using IIS for hosting your application, then the default upload file size if 4MB. To increase it, please use this below section in your web.config -

<configuration>
    <system.web>
        <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1048576" />
    </system.web>
</configuration>

For IIS7 and above, you also need to add the lines below:

 <system.webServer>
   <security>
      <requestFiltering>
         <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1073741824" />
      </requestFiltering>
   </security>
 </system.webServer>

Note: maxAllowedContentLength is measured in bytes while maxRequestLength is measured in kilobytes, which is why the values differ in this config example. (Both are equivalent to 1 GB.)

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4  
Thank you sachin and i added some thing like <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="32768" executionTimeout="180" /> – Surya sasidhar Oct 4 '10 at 9:04
7  
maxAllowedContentLength must be in bytes, not kilobytes, so the examples provided are not equivalent. – mdsharpe May 18 '12 at 16:13
14  
With both IIS 7.5 and VS RC 2012 IIS Express I had to set BOTH of these. The httpRuntime one configures ASP.NET's max length while requestLimits configures IIS's max length, stackoverflow.com/questions/6327452/… and forums.iis.net/t/1169846.aspx – Despertar Aug 6 '12 at 8:21
9  
It's worth pointing out, again, that the maxAllowedContentLength is in bytes, not kilobytes. The two values should not be the same number, because they are not the same measurement unit. – Pandincus Oct 10 '12 at 18:59
4  
Make sure that you're adding this setting to the main Web.config instead of the one inside the Views folder – Serj Sagan Mar 4 '13 at 15:29

I don't think it's been mentioned here, but to get this working, I had to supply both of these values in the web.config:

In system.web

<httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1048576" executionTimeout="3600" />

And in system.webServer

<security>
    <requestFiltering>
        <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1073741824" />
    </requestFiltering>
</security>

IMPORTANT : Both of these values must match. In this case, my max upload is 1024 megabytes.

maxRequestLength has 1048576 KILOBYTES, and maxAllowedContentLength has 1073741824 BYTES.

I know it's obvious, but it's easy to overlook.

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8  
Thank you. This answer should have more up votes - I was stuck till I scrolled down and saw it. – Robert Jan 9 '13 at 17:08
6  
Thanks for this answer. FYI to anyone on Azure this solution works there too. – aknatn Feb 13 '13 at 2:11
3  
To any it may concern: This answer also works perfectly for IIS-Express (asp.net-webpages with WebMatrix) – VoidKing Mar 1 '13 at 21:36
4  
This is definitely the correct answer... both entries must be present. In case of MVC 3, it can be in the project root web.config file. – Miguel Angelo Jun 3 '13 at 22:05
13  
I had to combine this with an existing line for: <httpRuntime targetFramework="4.5" maxRequestLength="1048576" executionTimeout="3600" /> – Ken Mc Nov 20 '13 at 0:53

It may be worth noting that you may want to limit this change to the URL you expect to be used for the upload rather then your entire site.

<location path="Documents/Upload">
  <system.web>
    <!-- 50MB in kilobytes, default is 4096 or 4MB-->
    <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="51200" />
  </system.web>
  <system.webServer>
    <security>
      <requestFiltering>
        <!-- 50MB in bytes, default is 30000000 or approx. 28.6102 Mb-->
        <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="52428800" /> 
      </requestFiltering>
    </security>
  </system.webServer>
</location>
share|improve this answer
    
Nice Solution thinking about the location. But is there a location path when working with MVC (and therefore working with routes)? – Luuk Krijnen Aug 6 '14 at 14:02
1  
It would be a URL corresponding to the route that you have your upload action set to. In my case, I have a Documents controller with an action called Upload that I post the form to. In your case it would be whatever the url to your action would be. – Nick Albrecht Aug 6 '14 at 16:17
    
For anyone who likes this answer, see this. – DontVoteMeDown Jan 7 '15 at 11:44
    
@NickAlbrecht, Is this working for web APIs? – Allan Chua Jul 14 '15 at 3:29
    
@NickAlbrecht, Is this working for web APIs? – Allan Chua Jul 14 '15 at 3:30

The maximum request size is, by default, 4mb (4096 KB)

This is explained here: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;295626

The above article also explains how to fix this issue :)

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3  
The link is redirecting me to the microsoft support homepage – Bishop Oct 13 '15 at 16:17

There's an element in web.config to configure the max size of the uploaded file:

<httpRuntime 
    maxRequestLength="1048576"
  />
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And just in case someone's looking for a way to handle this exception and show a meaningful explanation to the user (something like "You're uploading a file that is too big"):

//Global.asax
private void Application_Error(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var ex = Server.GetLastError();
    var httpException = ex as HttpException ?? ex.InnerException as HttpException;
    if(httpException == null) return;

    if(httpException.WebEventCode == WebEventCodes.RuntimeErrorPostTooLarge)
    {
        //handle the error
        Response.Write("Too big a file, dude"); //for example
    }
}

(ASP.NET 4 or later required)

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maxAllowedContentLength should be higher than (maxRequestLength * 1024) for the exception generation. – Der_Meister Jan 19 at 4:50

maxRequestLength (length in KB) Here as ex. I took 1024 (1MB) maxAllowedContentLength (length in Bytes) should be same as your maxRequestLength (1048576 bytes = 1MB).

<system.web>
   <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1024"
             executionTimeout="3600" />
   <compilation debug="true"/>
</system.web>

<security>
  <requestFiltering>
    <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1048576"/>
  </requestFiltering>
</security>
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If you have a request going to an application in the site, make sure you set maxRequestLength in the root web.config. The maxRequestLength in the applications's web.config appears to be ignored.

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It bothered me for days too. I modified the Web.config file but it didn't work. It turned out that there are two Web.config file in my project, and I should modified the one in the ROOT directory, not the others. Hope this would be helpful.

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I can add to config web uncompiled

<system.web> 
  <httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1024" executionTimeout="3600" /> 
  <compilation debug="true"/> 
</system.web> 
<security> 
  <requestFiltering> 
    <requestLimits maxAllowedContentLength="1048576"/> 
  </requestFiltering> 
</security>
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I was tripped up by the fact that our web.config file has multiple system.web sections: it worked when I added < httpRuntime maxRequestLength="1048576" /> to the system.web section that at the configuration level.

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Please check this code demurrer to solve your problem.. copy it, it is a web.config file. .

<system.web>
     <httpRuntime executionTimeout="3600" maxRequestLength="102400" requestLengthDiskThreshold="80" useFullyQualifiedRedirectUrl="false"
     minFreeThreads="8" minLocalRequestFreeThreads="4" appRequestQueueLimit="100" enableKernelOutputCache="true" enableVersionHeader="true"
     requireRootedSaveAsPath="true" enable="true" shutdownTimeout="90" delayNotificationTimeout="5" waitChangeNotification="0"
     maxWaitChangeNotification="0" enableHeaderChecking="true" sendCacheControlHeader="true" apartmentThreading="false" />
<system.web>
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19  
This contains a boatload of stuff irrelevant to the original question. – georgiosd Nov 24 '13 at 19:55
1  
Not focused to solve the OP question. – DanielV Oct 28 '15 at 16:38

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