Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following route in my Rails 3 app.

post 'games/:id/:task/:card_id' => 'games#perform', :as => :perform

...which allows, obviously, such requests as button_to("Foo", {card_id=>2, :action=>:perform, :task=>"foo"}), mapping to the URL /games/1/foo/2.

I'd like to restrict the set of tasks the route matches. The Rails API docs indicate that "Constraints can include the ‘ignorecase’ and ‘extended syntax’ regular expression modifiers". However, the following works as expected:

post 'games/:id/:task/:card_id' => 'games#perform', :as => :perform, :constraints => {:task => /(foo|bar)/}

But the following doesn't:

post 'games/:id/:task/:card_id' => 'games#perform', :as => :perform, :constraints => {:task => /(foo|
                                                                                                 bar)/x}

In the latter case, the button_to link above produces the URL: /games/perform?card_id=2&task=foo.

Is this a bug, or am I doing something wrong?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yeah, there's a bug in the RegexpWithNamedGroups processing for Ruby 1.8.x because it fakes the named regexp groups syntax of 1.9 in a way that is incompatible with regexp modifiers.

The problem here is that with 1.8 Rails uses a simple index of the paren group within the regexp to map to the name. When you add a modifier to a regexp, internally this creates an additional group which throws the index off by one.

Workaround right now is to use 1.9, or no modifier.

share|improve this answer
    
Great info, thanks. Have you got a link to the bug report? –  Chowlett Apr 14 '11 at 6:07
    
I want to confirm it's still a bug in HEAD first, and right now HEAD isn't running for me. I'll add it though. –  smathy Apr 14 '11 at 15:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.