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var q = from child in doc.Descendants("level")
        where (int)child.Attribute("id") == 55
        select (string)child.Element("Points").**Value.ToString()**;

I would like to get q as a type string after executing this query. Even after keeping the extra bolded line this is giving me some IEnumerable type.

Well let me put it this way. I would like to make the above query something like below one without the runtime throwing any error.

string q = from child in doc.Descendants("level")
           where (int)child.Attribute("id") == 55
           select (string)child.Element("Points");

Any help?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
var q = (from child in doc.Descendants("level")
        where (int)child.Attribute("id") == 55
        select (string)child.Element("Points")).FirstOrDefault();

Enumerable.FirstOrDefault Method (IEnumerable)

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That's kewl..thanks CD..I'm falling in love with this LINQ stuffs. –  async Oct 4 '10 at 10:06

LINQ will always return an enumerable result. To get it to evaluate and return one result you can use

.First()

.FirstOrDefault()

.Single()

.SingleOrDefault()

depending on your requirement.

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The query will return IEnumerable even if the result contains single record. Try this -

if q.count() > 0
    var singleQ = q.First();

Or if you are sure that there will be atleast one record then do it like this -

string q = (from child in doc.Descendants("level")
           where (int)child.Attribute("id") == 55
           select (string)child.Element("Points")).First();
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Thanks Ramesh.. –  async Oct 4 '10 at 10:06
    
Your first one - testing (q.count() > 0) first - will evaluate the query twice won't it? Once to check the count then once to read the value. If you use First or FirstOrDefault then it should only evaluate it once. –  Rup Oct 4 '10 at 10:07
    
you can use Any() instead. –  CD.. Oct 4 '10 at 10:10

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