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What is the difference between INNER JOIN and OUTER JOIN?

How do LEFT JOIN, RIGHT JOIN, and FULL JOIN fit in?

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14 Answers 14

up vote 2496 down vote accepted

Assuming you're joining on columns with no duplicates, which is a very common case:

  • An inner join of A and B gives the result of A intersect B, i.e. the inner part of a venn diagram intersection.

  • An outer join of A and B gives the results of A union B, i.e. the outer parts of a venn diagram union.

Examples

Suppose you have two Tables, with a single column each, and data as follows:

A    B
-    -
1    3
2    4
3    5
4    6

Note that (1,2) are unique to A, (3,4) are common, and (5,6) are unique to B.

Inner join

An inner join using either of the equivalent queries gives the intersection of the two tables, i.e. the two rows they have in common.

select * from a INNER JOIN b on a.a = b.b;
select a.*,b.*  from a,b where a.a = b.b;

a | b
--+--
3 | 3
4 | 4

Left outer join

A left outer join will give all rows in A, plus any common rows in B.

select * from a LEFT OUTER JOIN b on a.a = b.b;
select a.*,b.*  from a,b where a.a = b.b(+);

a |  b  
--+-----
1 | null
2 | null
3 |    3
4 |    4

Full outer join

A full outer join will give you the union of A and B, i.e. All the rows in A and all the rows in B. If something in A doesn't have a corresponding datum in B, then the B portion is null, and vice versa.

select * from a FULL OUTER JOIN b on a.a = b.b;

 a   |  b  
-----+-----
   1 | null
   2 | null
   3 |    3
   4 |    4
null |    6
null |    5
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4  
It would be good to augment the example by adding another row in table B with value 4. This will show that inner joins need not be on equal no of rows. –  Pratik Aug 30 '09 at 12:59
132  
An excellent explanation, however this statement: An outer join of A and B gives the results of A union B, i.e. the outer parts of a venn diagram union. isn't phrased accurately. An outer join will give the results of A intersect B in addition to one of the following: all of A (left join), all of B (right join) or all of A and all of B (full join). Only this last scenario is really A union B. Still, a well written explanation. –  Thomas May 3 '11 at 19:57
32  
Simple explanations are often the best. This FAR EXCEEDS the Wikipedia on joins haha. Truly excellent examples with just enough data to see a clear picture. Thanks Mark :) –  Chiramisu Aug 2 '11 at 18:26
8  
Using Venn diagrams in the explanation instantly helped me understand! –  emurano Oct 13 '11 at 3:50
5  
Great Explanation. I made this: sqlfiddle.com/#!2/ea616/5 to play with the explanation. –  Brad Apr 7 '12 at 3:51

Also you can consider the following schema for different join types;

Enter image description here

Source: http://www.codeproject.com/Articles/33052/Visual-Representation-of-SQL-Joins

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81  
A classic example of when a picture is more worth than hundreds words ... –  aleroot Aug 31 '13 at 11:53
3  
I wish I could give this visual representation more than one votes! It has helped my understanding immensely. –  mezoid Mar 7 at 3:15
    
I know this is old, but I'm doing some training sessions for some of our employee's here on Crystal Reports/SQL and this will come in Immensely handy! Thanks~! –  Evan L Mar 10 at 22:49
2  
Note: There's no FULL OUTER JOIN in MySQL. stackoverflow.com/questions/12473210/… –  Michael Ozeryansky Mar 25 at 2:25

I recommend Jeff's blog article. The best description I've ever seen, plus there is a visualization, e.g.:

Inner Join:

enter image description here

Full Outer Join:

enter image description here

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19  
This diagram is a bit misleading for the concept. Read the comments in the post as well. –  Pratik Aug 30 '09 at 12:56
3  
Excellent explanation that allows to remember the meaning! –  Budda Apr 20 '12 at 16:44
1  
@ya23: what does you mean by full outer join? –  ursitesion Feb 12 at 9:20

The following was taken from the article "MySQL - LEFT JOIN and RIGHT JOIN, INNER JOIN and OUTER JOIN" by Graham Ellis on his blog Horse's Mouth.

In a database such as MySQL, data is divided into a number of tables which are then connected (Joined) together by JOIN in SELECT commands to read records from multiple tables. Read this example to see how it works.

First, some sample data:

people
    mysql> select * from people;
    +------------+--------------+------+
    | name       | phone        | pid  |
    +------------+--------------+------+
    | Mr Brown   | 01225 708225 |    1 |
    | Miss Smith | 01225 899360 |    2 |
    | Mr Pullen  | 01380 724040 |    3 |
    +------------+--------------+------+
    3 rows in set (0.00 sec)

property
    mysql> select * from property;
    +------+------+----------------------+
    | pid  | spid | selling              |
    +------+------+----------------------+
    |    1 |    1 | Old House Farm       |
    |    3 |    2 | The Willows          |
    |    3 |    3 | Tall Trees           |
    |    3 |    4 | The Melksham Florist |
    |    4 |    5 | Dun Roamin           |
    +------+------+----------------------+
    5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

REGULAR JOIN

If we do a regular JOIN (with none of the keywords INNER, OUTER, LEFT or RIGHT), then we get all records that match in the appropriate way in the two tables, and records in both incoming tables that do not match are not reported:

mysql> select name, phone, selling 
from people join property 
on people.pid = property.pid;
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
| name      | phone        | selling              |
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
| Mr Brown  | 01225 708225 | Old House Farm       |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | The Willows          |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | Tall Trees           |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | The Melksham Florist |
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
4 rows in set (0.01 sec)

LEFT JOIN

If we do a LEFT JOIN, we get all records that match in the same way and IN ADDITION we get an extra record for each unmatched record in the left table of the join - thus ensuring (in this example) that every PERSON gets a mention:

   mysql> select name, phone, selling 
    from people left join property 
    on people.pid = property.pid; 
    +------------+--------------+----------------------+
    | name       | phone        | selling              |
    +------------+--------------+----------------------+
    | Mr Brown   | 01225 708225 | Old House Farm       |
    | Miss Smith | 01225 899360 | NULL <<-- unmatch    |
    | Mr Pullen  | 01380 724040 | The Willows          |
    | Mr Pullen  | 01380 724040 | Tall Trees           |
    | Mr Pullen  | 01380 724040 | The Melksham Florist |
    +------------+--------------+----------------------+
    5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

RIGHT JOIN

If we do a RIGHT JOIN, we get all the records that match and IN ADDITION an extra record for each unmatched record in the right table of the join - in my example, that means that each property gets a mention even if we don't have seller details:

mysql> select name, phone, selling 
from people right join property 
on people.pid = property.pid;
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
| name      | phone        | selling              |
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
| Mr Brown  | 01225 708225 | Old House Farm       |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | The Willows          |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | Tall Trees           |
| Mr Pullen | 01380 724040 | The Melksham Florist |
| NULL      | NULL         | Dun Roamin           |
+-----------+--------------+----------------------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

An INNER JOIN does a full join, just like the first example, and the word OUTER may be added after the word LEFT or RIGHT in the last two examples - it's provided for ODBC compatibility and doesn't add an extra capabilities.

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Thanks For explaining Regular Join Also –  Ranjit Kumar Jun 7 '13 at 10:18
3  
REGULAR JOIN and INNER JOIN are the same thing. What Graham Ellis wanted to say whit REGULAR is that INNER JOIN is the "default" JOIN, when none of LEFT or RIGHT keywords were specified. If you read the whole post, in the end He says "An INNER JOIN does a full join, just like the first example, and the word OUTER may be added after the word LEFT or RIGHT in the last two examples - it's provided for ODBC compatibility and doesn't add an extra capabilities." –  vegatripy Aug 19 '13 at 11:04

A (left) inner join only shows rows if there is a matching record on the other (right) side of the join.

A (left) outer join shows rows for each record on the left hand side, even if there are no matching rows on the other (right) side of the join. If there is no matching row, the columns for the other (right) side would show NULLs.

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In simple words:

An inner join retrieve the matched rows only.

Whereas an outer join retrieve the matched rows from one table and all rows in other table ....the result depends on which one you are using:

  • Left: Matched rows in the right table and all rows in the left table

  • Right: Matched rows in the left table and all rows in the right table or

  • Full: All rows in all tables. It doesn't matter if there is a match or not

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Joins can be categorized as:

Inner joins (the typical join operation, which uses some comparison operator like = or <>). These include equi-joins and natural joins.

Inner joins use a comparison operator to match rows from two tables based on the values in common columns from each table. For example, retrieving all rows where the student identification number is the same in both the students and courses tables.

Outer joins. Outer joins can be a left, a right, or full outer join.

Outer joins are specified with one of the following sets of keywords when they are specified in the FROM clause:

LEFT JOIN or LEFT OUTER JOIN -The result set of a left outer join includes all the rows from the left table specified in the LEFT OUTER clause, not just the ones in which the joined columns match. When a row in the left table has no matching rows in the right table, the associated result set row contains null values for all select list columns coming from the right table.

RIGHT JOIN or RIGHT OUTER JOIN - A right outer join is the reverse of a left outer join. All rows from the right table are returned. Null values are returned for the left table any time a right table row has no matching row in the left table.

FULL JOIN or FULL OUTER JOIN - A full outer join returns all rows in both the left and right tables. Any time a row has no match in the other table, the select list columns from the other table contain null values. When there is a match between the tables, the entire result set row contains data values from the base tables.

Cross joins - Cross joins return all rows from the left table, each row from the left table is combined with all rows from the right table. Cross joins are also called Cartesian products. (A Cartesian join will get you a Cartesian product. A Cartesian join is when you join every row of one table to every row of another table. You can also get one by joining every row of a table to every row of itself.)

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3  
-1 looks messy in comparison to previous answers. Pay more attention to structuring. –  Timur Sadykov Apr 10 '12 at 23:51
9  
Agree- presentation matters. On the other hand, you always have the option of editing the answer. –  David Manheim Jun 11 '12 at 21:46

Inner Join

Retrieve the matched rows only, that is, A intersect B.

Enter image description here

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Students S
INNER JOIN dbo.Advisors A
    ON S.Advisor_ID = A.Advisor_ID

Left Outer Join

Select all records from the first table, and any records in the second table that match the joined keys.

Enter image description here

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Students S
LEFT JOIN dbo.Advisors A
    ON S.Advisor_ID = A.Advisor_ID

Full Outer Join

Select all records from the second table, and any records in the first table that match the joined keys.

Enter image description here

SELECT *
FROM dbo.Students S
FULL JOIN dbo.Advisors A
    ON S.Advisor_ID = A.Advisor_ID

References

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4  
What is the name of tool? I find it is interesting as it shows number of rows and venn-diagrams –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 27 at 12:23
1  
@GrijeshChauhan Datamartist :) –  Tushar Gupta Jan 27 at 12:25
1  
@Trushar :( it is not for Linux system.. –  Grijesh Chauhan Jan 27 at 12:27
1  
@GrijeshChauhan Yeah But you can Try to run it using wine . –  Tushar Gupta Jan 27 at 12:30
1  
@GrijeshChauhan All the best, Let me know if u get successful :) –  Tushar Gupta Jan 27 at 12:38

Inner joins require that a record with a related ID exist in the joined table.

Outer joins will return records for the left side even if nothing exists for the right side.

For instance, you have an Orders and an OrderDetails table. They are related by an "OrderID".

Orders

  • OrderID
  • CustomerName

OrderDetails

  • OrderDetailID
  • OrderID
  • ProductName
  • Qty
  • Price

The request

SELECT Orders.OrderID, Orders.CustomerName FROM Orders 
INNER JOIN OrderDetails ON Orders.OrderID = OrderDetails.OrderID

will only return Orders that also have something in the OrderDetails table.

If you change it to OUTER LEFT JOIN

SELECT Orders.OrderID, Orders.CustomerName FROM Orders 
LEFT JOIN OrderDetails ON Orders.OrderID = OrderDetails.OrderID

then it will return records from the Orders table even if they have no OrderDetails records.

You can use this to find Orders that do not have any OrderDetails indicating a possible orphaned order by adding a where clause like WHERE OrderDetails.OrderID IS NULL.

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I appreciate the simple yet realistic example. I changed a request like SELECT c.id, c.status, cd.name, c.parent_id, cd.description, c.image FROM categories c, categories_description cd WHERE c.id = cd.categories_id AND c.status = 1 AND cd.language_id = 2 ORDER BY c.parent_id ASC to SELECT c.id, c.status, cd.name, c.parent_id, cd.description, c.image FROM categories c INNER JOIN categories_description cd ON c.id = cd.categories_id WHERE c.status = 1 AND cd.language_id = 2 ORDER BY c.parent_id ASC (MySQL) with success. I wasn't sure about the additional conditions, they mix well... –  PhiLho Jan 5 '13 at 11:11

You use INNER JOIN to return all rows from both tables where there is a match. ie. in the resulting table all the rows and colums will have values.

In OUTER JOIN the relulting table may have empty colums. Outer join may be either LEFT or RIGHT

LEFT OUTER JOIN returns all the rows from the first table, even if there are no matches in the second table.

RIGHT OUTER JOIN returns all the rows from the second table, even if there are no matches in the first table..

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1  
This question was asked over four years ago, and had 17 answers before yours. In what way does your answer improve upon those that already exist? –  John Saunders Oct 2 '12 at 19:15

INNER JOIN requires there is at least a match in comparing the two tables. For example, table A and table B which implies A ٨ B (A intersection B).

LEFT OUTER JOIN and LEFT JOIN are the same. It gives all the records matching in both tables and all possibilities of the left table.

Similarly, RIGHT OUTER JOIN and RIGHT JOIN are the same. It gives all the records matching in both tables and all possibilities of the right table.

FULL JOIN is the combination of LEFT OUTER JOIN and RIGHT OUTER JOIN without duplication.

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The difference is in the way tables are joined if there are no common records.

  • JOIN is same as INNER JOIN and means to only show records common to both tables. Whether the records are common is determined by the fields in join clause. For example:

    FROM t1
    JOIN t2 on t1.ID = t2.ID
    

    means show only records where the same ID value exists in both tables.

  • LEFT JOIN is same as LEFT OUTER JOIN and means to show all records from left table (i.e. the one that precedes in SQL statement) regardless of the existance of matching records in the right table.

  • RIGHT JOIN is same as RIGHT OUTER JOIN and means opposite of LEFT JOIN, i.e. shows all records from the second (right) table and only matching records from first (left) table.

Source: What's the difference between LEFT, RIGHT, INNER, OUTER, JOIN?

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I don't see much details about performance and optimizer in the other answers.

Sometimes it is good to know that only inner join is associative which means the optimizer has the most option to play with it. It can reorder the join order to make it faster keeping the same result. The optimizer can use the most join modes.

Generally it is a good practice to try to use inner joins instead of the different kind of outers.

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Inner join. A join is combining the rows from two tables. An inner join attempts to match up the two tables based on the criteria you specify in the query, and only returns the rows that match. If a row from the first table in the join matches two rows in the second table, then two rows will be returned in the results. If there’s a row in the first table that doesn’t match a row in the second, it’s not returned; likewise, if there’s a row in the second table that doesn’t match a row in the first, it’s not returned.

Outer Join. A left join attempts to find match up the rows from the first table to rows in the second table. If it can’t find a match, it will return the columns from the first table and leave the columns from the second table blank (null).

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