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How do I find processes that listens to/uses my tcp ports? I'm on mac os x.

Sometimes, after a crash or some bug, my rails app is locking port 3000. I can't find it using ps -ef... How do I find the stupid thing and kill it, brutally... ?

When doing rails server I get

Address already in use - bind(2) (Errno::EADDRINUSE)

2014 update:

To complete some of the answers below: After executing the kill commands, deleting the pid file might be necessary rm ~/mypath/myrailsapp/tmp/pids/server.pid

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closed as off-topic by Ether, Esoteric Screen Name, Simon André Forsberg, G Gordon Worley III, Kevin Reid Sep 20 '13 at 22:22

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4  
Port 3000 is highly Rails development specific, wouldn't you agree? It's likely that less people will find the answer to this common Rails development issue and that it'll be re-asked if moved. I object. My 2 cents. –  oma Sep 21 '13 at 10:20
4  
eh, who cares if 3000 is rails specific....another +1 since I am trying to unlock port 8000....(I don't see why they close such useful questions). –  Dean Hiller Dec 30 '13 at 20:52
2  
A very neat solution to kill a process on ANY user-specified port can be found in @Kevin Suttle's answer below. Reproduced here for posterity: function killport() { lsof -i TCP:$1 | grep LISTEN | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9 } –  user456584 Jan 17 '14 at 18:39
8  
Putting a reopen vote on this. Developers typically need to manage resources on their own computers. Server Fault is for professional server administrators, not end-user developer machines. –  jmort253 Mar 18 '14 at 14:58
4  
I voted to re-open. Bash scripting can be considered programming. –  trusktr Nov 17 '14 at 18:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 251 down vote accepted

(1) You can try netstat

netstat -anp tcp | grep 3000

(2) If your netstat doesn't support -p, use lsof

lsof -i tcp:3000
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1  
netstat -anp fails. netstat: option requires an argument -- p –  oma Oct 4 '10 at 12:52
8  
netstat -anp tcp | grep 3000 shows tcp4 1062 0 127.0.0.1.3000 127.0.0.1.51255 ESTABLISHED what next? 1062 is not a pid... –  oma Oct 4 '10 at 13:03
6  
oh yes! you're update is correct. lsof -i tcp:3000 nice :) –  oma Oct 4 '10 at 14:16
2  
Thank you! Your answer gave birth to my "death_to 'port'" script. (#!/usr/bin/ruby lsof -t -i tcp:#{ARGV.first} | xargs kill) –  Sv1 Oct 2 '13 at 18:40
4  
The "terse" flag to lsof produces output suitable for piping to a subsequent kill: lsof -t -i tcp:1234 | xargs kill –  Manav Jan 7 '14 at 4:58

Find:

lsof -i :3000

Kill:

kill -9 <PID>
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3  
Found this most helpful. I like how lsof -i has table headers so I know what all the nonsense means –  netpoetica Sep 17 '13 at 5:21
1  
Upvote for simplicity and completeness –  BradGreens Oct 9 '13 at 18:59
6  
Sometimes lsof -i :port will show nothing. try sudo lsof -i :port. –  kilik52 Jan 30 '14 at 12:05

You can use lsof -i:3000.

That is "List Open Files". This gives you a list of the processes and which files and ports they use.

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I'm on 10.5 lepard (updated Q). I don't know if that matters here, but lsof doesn't display ports. lsof -h (lsof 4.78) is too cryptic too me... –  oma Oct 4 '10 at 12:58
1  
Hmm. Don't know for sure on Leopard, but try (as root -- that's important, I think) lsof -i:3000. –  Matt Gibson Oct 4 '10 at 13:19
    
root wasn't necessary. lsof -i:3000 works too... edit your answer and put it in there. More visible. I gave you an upvote, but the answer to user#. Thanks for helping! –  oma Oct 4 '10 at 14:24
lsof -P | grep ':3000' | awk '{print $2}'

This will give you just the pid, tested on MacOS.

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2  
on MAC kill all pids on port 3000: lsof -P | grep ':3000' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9 –  mike clagg May 13 '13 at 21:18
    
can more than one process listen to the same port? –  Kris May 15 '13 at 16:16
    
Our rails app spawns workers which are child processes, and I have to use this to kill orphaned workers –  mike clagg May 15 '13 at 18:19
    
this also kills webbrowsers connecting to port –  fjsj Apr 27 at 15:06

In your .bash_profile, create a shortcut for terminate the 3000 process:

terminate(){
  lsof -P | grep ':3000' | awk '{print $2}' | xargs kill -9 
}

Then, call $terminate if it's blocked.

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4  
You can make this flexible enough for any port: github.com/kevinSuttle/dotfiles/commit/… –  Kevin Suttle Dec 30 '13 at 2:53

Nothing above worked for me. Anyone else with my experience could try the following (worked for me):

Run:

lsof -i :3000 (where 3000 is your current address in use)

then check status of the reported PID :

ps ax | grep <PID>

finally, "begone with it":

kill -QUIT <PID>
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