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How do I extract a double value from a string using regex.

import re

pattr = re.compile(???)    
x = pattr.match("4.5")      
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Could you provide some details on why you can't use float("4.5")? –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 22 '08 at 4:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Here's the easy way. Don't use regex's for built-in types.

try:
    x = float( someString )
except ValueError, e:
    # someString was NOT floating-point, what now?
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A regexp from the perldoc perlretut:

import re
re_float = re.compile("""(?x)
   ^
      [+-]?\ *      # first, match an optional sign *and space*
      (             # then match integers or f.p. mantissas:
          \d+       # start out with a ...
          (
              \.\d* # mantissa of the form a.b or a.
          )?        # ? takes care of integers of the form a
         |\.\d+     # mantissa of the form .b
      )
      ([eE][+-]?\d+)?  # finally, optionally match an exponent
   $""")
m = re_float.match("4.5")
print m.group(0)
# -> 4.5

To extract numbers from a bigger string:

s = """4.5 abc -4.5 abc - 4.5 abc + .1e10 abc . abc 1.01e-2 abc 
       1.01e-.2 abc 123 abc .123"""
print re.findall(r"[+-]? *(?:\d+(?:\.\d*)?|\.\d+)(?:[eE][+-]?\d+)?", s)
# -> ['4.5', '-4.5', '- 4.5', '+ .1e10', ' 1.01e-2',
#     '       1.01', '-.2', ' 123', ' .123']
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a float as regular expression in brute force. there are smaller differences to the version of J.F. Sebastian:

import re
if __name__ == '__main__':
  x = str(1.000e-123)
  reFloat = r'(^[+-]?\d+(?:\.\d+)?(?:[eE][+-]\d+)?$)'
  print re.match(reFloat,x)

>>> <_sre.SRE_Match object at 0x0054D3E0>
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This doesn't match floats without an integer part, e.g. .123 instead of 0.123. –  Martin Scharrer May 2 '13 at 11:57

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