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I have been using advance on some iterators, but I am afraid of a possible leapfrog above end(). I would like to make sure my iterators stay between the bounds, I thought of the distance but it seems it does not return what I would be expecting (non-positive values when iterators overpass end()). How would you make sure there is no leapfrog?

#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <list>
using namespace std;

int main () {
  list<int> mylist;
  for (int i=0; i<10; i++) mylist.push_back (i*10);

  list<int>::const_iterator first = mylist.begin();
  const list<int>::const_iterator last = mylist.end();

  cout << "The distance is: " << distance(first,last) << endl; // 10
  advance(first, 10);
  cout << "The distance is: " << distance(first,last) << endl; // 0
  advance(first, 1);
  cout << "The distance is: " << distance(first,last) << endl; // 10
  advance(first, 10);
  cout << "The distance is: " << distance(first,last) << endl; // 0

  return 0;
}

Here is the output:

The distance is: 10
The distance is: 0
The distance is: 10
The distance is: 0
share|improve this question
    
If you are looking for a way to make C++ iterators safe--sorry, neither C++ nor the STL was designed to be safe. Instead, doing things you shouldn't do with iterators tends to result in "undefined behavior"--i.e. a crash or worse. To paraphrase the answers below, you have to work around this by writing code that doesn't contain bugs ;) –  Qwertie Oct 4 '10 at 19:49
    
Thanks for the pieces of advice. I will directly work on the bugs. Still, I accepted Steve Townsend's answer, because I really like the code snippet. –  Wok Oct 4 '10 at 20:22
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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

advance() past end() results in undefined behaviour. You are going to have to test as you go per this snippet:

  template <class Iter, class Incr>
  void safe_advance(Iter& curr, const Iter& end, Incr n)
  {
    size_t remaining(std::distance(curr, end));
    if (remaining < n)
    {
      n = remaining;
    }
    std::advance(curr, n);
  }

You need to think about what happens when you don't move the full amount (curr returned as end().

share|improve this answer
    
I like the code snippet, thanks. –  Wok Oct 4 '10 at 16:54
    
@wok - you could change n to a ref as well, so you can find out how far it moved along each time –  Steve Townsend Oct 4 '10 at 20:46
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It is simple. To avoid going beyond .end() simply avoid going beyond .end(). The situation is no different as in avoiding to use NULL pointer etc. Structure your code so that it never happens. E.g. use loops that use conditions like it != v.end() etc. Some popular standard library implementations detects these errors and let you know but you should not rely on it, only use it during testing/debugging.

UPDATE

If you cannot be sure that you can advance() by amount bigger than one, then you simply must not advance() by more than one.

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1  
You do not answer the question. The question is about the advance() function. advance() does several increments at once and they may pass beyond end() and leapfrog. After the advance() is done, it may already be too late to test against end(). –  ypnos Oct 4 '10 at 15:13
    
@ypnos: The advice still holds, though. Just don't advance() beyond end()! –  Oli Charlesworth Oct 4 '10 at 15:19
    
i believe this should be proper answer. don't advance too much. –  Donotalo Oct 4 '10 at 15:22
    
I agree, however bugs are not always easy to catch, so never say never. Specifically about advance, this is a bit like a fountain, never say "I shall not drink of your water." :') –  Wok Oct 4 '10 at 20:19
1  
@elvis.dukaj: You must avoid going past the end. It is as simple as that. If you go past the end, you are simply <insert the F word here>. You are in the undefined behaviour land, in the lalaland. –  Václav Zeman Jun 5 '13 at 13:57
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It is inefficient to call distance or advance on anything other than models of RandomAccessIterator: the calls are O(n) where n represents the distance.

Also, the list is not truly a model of Sequence in that its size method is not guaranteed to be constant (or even amortized constant), indeed it could perfectly well be O(n).

Looking at the code (and if you cannot use anything else than a list) there are therefore two possibilities:

  • Don't use advance, move one item at a time and check with end at each step.
  • Compute the size once and for all at the beginning, then you know how much you can advance before invoking undefined behavior (you can keep a counter on the side, wrap the iterator etc...)

Let's act on this:

// Advance one at a time
// replace calls to advance by this function

typedef list<int>::const_iterator const_iterator;

const_iterator safe_advance(const_iterator it, const_iterator end, size_t n)
{
  for (size_t i = 0; i != n && it != end; ++i) { ++it; }
  return it;
}


// Precompute size
size_t const size = list.size();

size_t remaining = size;
const_iterator begin = list.begin();

size_t ad = std::min(10, remaining);
advance(begin, ad);
remaining -= ad;

ad = std::min(1, remaining);
advance(begin, ad);
remaining -= ad;

It is tedious to keep this count going though...

EDIT:

Addressing David's rightful concerns to generalize the solutions:

// Advance `it` from n, or up to end
// returns the number of steps that could not be performed
template <typename Iterator>
size_t safe_advance(Iterator& it, Iterator const& end, size_t n)
{
  size_t i = 0;
  for (; i != n && it != end; ++i, ++it);
  return n - i;
}

Note that for Bidirectional Iterators, advance is usable with negative distances, however this would require bringing in begin as well and would become really tedious. As such, I much prefer a second method:

template <typename BI>
size_t safe_reverse(BI& it, BI const& begin, size_t n)
{
  for (; n != 0 && it != begin; --n, --it);
  return n;
}

And finally, though I won't do it here, it would be good to specialize the templates for RandomAccessIterator since those operations can be done in O(1) with such ones.

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1  
I don't think safe_advance is safe without also checking it!=end –  MSN Oct 4 '10 at 19:22
    
It is a bit tedious. Anyway, thanks for the remarks about complexity. –  Wok Oct 4 '10 at 20:14
    
@MSN: right, I had begun with an assert within the for body and decided to be more lenient... but forgot to move the test :) –  Matthieu M. Oct 5 '10 at 9:05
    
+1 Much better than the accepted answer. I would, myself, change the interface so that it modifies the first iterator (as std::advance does) instead of returning it. Then the return value could be used to provide the caller with the number of steps that it was actually incremented (or alternatively the number of steps that were not executed when hitting end). That would enable users to differentiate when they rigthfully advanced to end from when they requested too long a jump. Also, the iterator type should be generic to allow iteration with non-const iterators if so desired. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 5 '10 at 10:40
    
@David: I went for the fastest solution to the problem at hand :-) I've added a template version with the interface you proposed. –  Matthieu M. Oct 5 '10 at 12:25
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For one thing you could also write an iterator wrapper that stores the end iterator and checks critical operations.

For example using boost's iterator_facade for brevity and not checking for underflows.

#include <boost/iterator/iterator_facade.hpp>
#include <iterator>
#include <stdexcept>

template <class Iter>
class checked_iterator:
    public boost::iterator_facade<
        checked_iterator<Iter>,
        typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::value_type,
        typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::iterator_category
    >
{
    Iter it, end;
public:
    checked_iterator(Iter it, Iter end): it(it), end(end) {} 
    void increment() 
    { 
        if (it == end) { throw std::range_error("checked_iterator: increment beyond end"); }
        ++it;
    }
    void decrement()
    {
        //TODO: this is not checked
        --it;
    }
    bool equal(const checked_iterator& other) const
    {
        return it == other.it;
    }
    typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::reference dereference() const 
    {
        if (it == end) { throw std::range_error("checked_iterator: dereference end"); }
        return *it;
    }
    void advance(typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::difference_type n)
    {
        //TODO: not checked for underflow
        if (std::distance(it, end) < n) { throw std::range_error("checked_iterator: advance beyond end"); }
        it += n;
    }
    typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::difference_type distance_to(const checked_iterator& other) const
    {
        return other.it - it;
    }
    Iter base() const { return it; }
};

//create checked_iterators from containers, could be overloaded for arrays
template <class Container>
checked_iterator<typename Container::iterator> checked_begin(Container& c)
{
    return checked_iterator<typename Container::iterator>(c.begin(), c.end());
}

template <class Container>
checked_iterator<typename Container::const_iterator> checked_begin(const Container& c)
{
    return checked_iterator<typename Container::const_iterator>(c.begin(), c.end());
}

template <class Container>
checked_iterator<typename Container::iterator> checked_end(Container& c)
{
    return checked_iterator<typename Container::iterator>(c.end(), c.end());
}

template <class Container>
checked_iterator<typename Container::const_iterator> checked_end(const Container& c)
{
    return checked_iterator<typename Container::const_iterator>(c.end(), c.end());
}

Example test code:

#include <vector>
#include <list>
#include <iostream>
int main()
{
    typedef std::list<int> Container;
    try {
        Container v(10);
        checked_iterator<Container::iterator> it = checked_begin(v);
        std::advance(it, 6);
        std::cout << *it << '\n';
        std::advance(it, 4);
        std::cout << *it << '\n';
        const Container& r = v;
        checked_iterator<Container::const_iterator> cit = checked_begin(r);
        std::advance(cit, 11);
    }
    catch (const std::exception& e) {
        std::cout << e.what() << '\n';
    }
}

As to implementing a safe_advance function, this could also distinguish between random access iterators and others, like std::advance for efficiency reasons:

#include <iterator>
#include <stdexcept>

namespace detail
{
    template <class Iter>
    void safe_advance_aux(
        Iter& it, Iter end, 
        typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::difference_type n, 
        std::random_access_iterator_tag
        )
    {
        if (end - it < n) throw std::range_error("advance beyond end (ra)");
        it += n;
    }

    template <class Iter, class Tag>
    void safe_advance_aux(
        Iter& it, Iter end, 
        typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::difference_type n, 
        Tag
        )
    {
        for (typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::difference_type i = 0; i != n; ++i) {
            if (it == end) throw std::range_error("advance beyond end");
            ++it;
        }
    }
}

template <class Iter>
void safe_advance(Iter& it, Iter end, typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::difference_type n)
{
    detail::safe_advance_aux(it, end, n, typename std::iterator_traits<Iter>::iterator_category());
}
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I think you're trying to solve the wrong problem here.

Don't use advance in a way that could result in going past end. You would never use increment (a special form of advance) when your current iterator is pointing to end, so similarly you should never use advance unless your code already knows there are enough remaining elements in the container. If you aren't sure, you need to increment one at a time and check for end on each item. advance doesn't (and can't) do any checking for you as it would be a performance hit for code that doesn't need that functionality.

Instead, examine your code and figure out WHY a call to advance could cause it to run off the end of your container, and fix that problem with your code instead.

A little more context might give us a better chance to help.

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I am reviewing the code in order to find the bug in the more upstream way. My question may not deal with the right problem to debug the code, but I believe it is still relevant. :) –  Wok Oct 4 '10 at 16:57
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Distance can't do this. When your container doesn't offer random access, it tries to reach end by advancing start, which will cause havoc when start overtook last.

You have to start from a valid starting point (i.e. by advancing start you can reach last) and check distance before each advance and only advance by an X<=(distance(first,last) in order not to overtake last.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is common sense. –  Wok Oct 4 '10 at 16:53
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