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I have an SVG file with some math equations. Lets say I include this file into my html document. Now what I'd like to do is to make some simple modifications to the contents of the svg using javascript in the html document.

A specific example
My svg file contains a nicely formatted version of this equation:

x^2 + 2x + 1 = 0

and I'd like to make the following changes:

  1. Color the x^2 red
  2. Remove 2x from the equation

Thanks.

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The American Mathematical Society got tired of the poor support for mathematical markup on the web so they hired some programmers. Their mission, to make maths appear by any means necessary. The result is Mathjax. Browser supports MathML? It uses it. Supports SVG? It uses it. Supports CSS? It uses it. And all you have to do is type LaTeX directly into the HTML. See: link. –  Max Murphy Mar 29 at 19:45
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2 Answers 2

If you want interactive mathematical equations, then you might want to have a look at JSXGraph.

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I currently just need to display the equations themselves, but thanks anyway :) –  Michael Oct 5 '10 at 11:47
    
Ah, my bad :) Misread your question, thought you were displaying a plot of that function. Assuming your equation is text, just wrap a tspan element around the part you want to style, e.g <tspan fill="red">x^2</tspan>. To "remove" a part from the equation, assuming that means you want to temporarily hide it, you can use display="none" on the 2x part (again, wrap it in a tspan if necessary). –  Erik Dahlström Oct 5 '10 at 13:19
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What you need to do is to attach yourself onto the load event of the SVG image. There is a nice SVG jQuery Plugin to do just that for you (and some more):

You should also check out the good resource on Javascript animating SVGs from David Dailey.

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Thanks. This was exactly what I asked for. Although I found an easier solution to writing my math equations. I just convert my latex-equations to png. Then add them to a canvas using Raphaël. When I want to my equation to change I just update the image with a new png file. This solution requires a lot less coding, but at the expense of loading lots of png files. –  Michael Oct 5 '10 at 11:43
    
I always like solutions requiring less coding. If your question really is about Math Equations you should also read up on "MathML". Most recent browsers support MathML - except IE. –  Dennis G Oct 5 '10 at 11:54
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