Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a good way to do something like this:

typedef struct user
{
  unsigned long id;
  //userList defined below
  userList friends;
}

typedef struct
{
  //userList contains users
  user * list;
  int count;
} userList;

Is there a legal way to do this or something similar?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A struct definition can be an incomplete structure or union type by just defining or typedef'ing the struct tag. This can be used to declare pointers.

To declare an actual object, though, it can't be an incomplete type.

So, order your declarations so that the forward reference is the pointer and the backwards reference is the object.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Do it like:

typedef struct user user;

typedef struct
{
  //userList contains users
  user * list;
  int count;
} userList;

struct user
{
  unsigned long id;
  //userList defined above
  userList friends;
};
share|improve this answer
    
bleh I was too slow –  Spudd86 Oct 4 '10 at 16:35
    
Nice, but I like DigitalRoss' explanation of why it works –  Richard Hoffman Oct 7 '10 at 17:18
add comment

There is no way to reference a concrete (non-pointer) type before it's defined in C. You must use a pointer + a type declaration or actually define the type before it can be consumed.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.