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So I was playing around with CSS3 and HTML5 on my page trying to keep up to date. I was playing with the rotateY setting of the new CSS transform and I was wondering if there was a way to flip something over that it has two different sides but using only CSS and HTML. I searched the Internet and didn't find any tutorials.

Anyway, I came up with this. (Can also be found at the link above, near the bottom of the page.)

Of course, to see this effect, it must be viewed in a Webkit browser.

HTML

<div class="flip">
 <div>
 <img src="images/yyc.jpg" alt="Calgary International Airport"/>
  <section>
  <h3>Image Metadata</h3>
  <p><strong>Where:</strong> Calgary International Airport</p>
  <p><strong>When:</strong> July 25, 2008</p>
  <p><strong>Camera:</strong> Canon EOS 30D</p>
  <p><strong>Photographer:</strong> <a href="http://photo.net/photos/Vian" title="Photo.net">Vian Esterhuizen</a></p>
  </section>
 </div>
</div>

CSS

.flip{
    float:left;
    position:relative;
    width:421px;
    height:237px;
    background:#111;
    border:2px solid #111;
    margin:2px 0;
    -webkit-transition-property: -webkit-transform, background;
    -webkit-transition-duration: 1s, 0;
    -webkit-transition-delay: 0, 0.3s;
    overflow:hidden;
}
.flip:hover{
    -webkit-transform: rotateY(180deg);
}
.flip > div{
    position:absolute;
    left:0;
    top:0;
    width:842px;
    height:237px;   
    overflow:hidden;
    -webkit-transition-property: left;
    -webkit-transition-duration: 0;
    -webkit-transition-delay: 0.3s;
}
.flip > div img{
    float:left;
    width:421px;
    height:237px;
    -webkit-transition-property: -webkit-transform;
    -webkit-transition-duration: 0;
    -webkit-transition-delay: 0.3s;
}
.flip > div > section{
    float:left;
    width:401px;
    height:217px;
    padding:10px;
    background:top right url('../images/esterhuizen-photography.gif') no-repeat;
    -webkit-transition-property: -webkit-transform;
    -webkit-transition-duration: 0;
    -webkit-transition-delay: 0.3s;
}
.flip:hover > div{
    left:-421px;
}
.flip:hover > div img, .flip:hover > div > section{
    -webkit-transform: rotateY(180deg);
}

Yes, I realize that's probably way too much markup for such a simple action but I wanted to see if it's possible.

So my question is, I made up this technique, but is there a better, more efficient one out there that I didn't find? Or, is there a better/more efficient way to do what I did?

Thank you

share|improve this question
    
Wow, that's impressive! There may well be some jQuery solutions to this, but I'd say this was very well done! –  Kyle Sevenoaks Oct 5 '10 at 8:26
    
Well thank you. I saw lots of jQuery options but I was convinced there was a way to do it without. –  Vian Esterhuizen Oct 6 '10 at 0:01
add comment

3 Answers 3

How about:

HTML

<div class="flip1">
  FLIP 1<br />
  FLIP 1<br />
  FLIP 1<br />
  FLIP 1<br />
</div>
<div class="flip2">
  FLIP 2<br />
  FLIP 2<br />
  FLIP 2<br />
  FLIP 2<br />
</div>

CSS

div {
    -webkit-animation-duration: 4s;
    -webkit-animation-iteration-count: infinite;
    -webkit-animation-timing-function:linear;
    -webkit-backface-visibility: hidden;
    color: blue;
    font-family: Helvetica,Arial,sans-serif;
    font-weight: bold;
    padding: 20px;
    position: absolute;
}

@-webkit-keyframes flip1 {
    from { -webkit-transform: rotateX(0deg); }
    to { -webkit-transform: rotateX(360deg); }
}

div.flip1 {
    -webkit-animation-name: flip1;
}

@-webkit-keyframes flip2 {
    from { -webkit-transform: rotateX(-180deg); }
    to { -webkit-transform: rotateX(180deg); }
}

div.flip2 {
    -webkit-animation-name: flip2;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
demo of the above, for the curious: jsfiddle.net/philfreo/fwxQK –  philfreo Jul 2 '12 at 13:55
    
Thanks, @philfreo –  Mike Jul 2 '12 at 20:22
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I think what you are looking for is -webkit-backface-visibility. This is webkit specific however and not in any standards.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you, that's really helpful. I`ll have to play with that to see how it fits into the idea I have. P.S. What a coincidence, I just recently started following you on Twitter. –  Vian Esterhuizen Jan 11 '11 at 4:37
add comment

I was googling for what to put in the -webkit-transition-property to specify that I wanted to rotate an element, so thanks for that :)

Paul Bakaus has a nice flip animation for iPhone, it involves javascript (and jQuery) to make the flip when a button is pressed: http://paulbakaus.com/lab/css/flip/

share|improve this answer
1  
Link is busted. –  Daniel X Moore Dec 23 '11 at 19:52
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