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Unicode character in octets is something like 110xxxxx 10xxxxxx. How can I transform these octets in hexadecimal notation like U+XXXX?

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You can leverage iconv's UTF-8 decoder to avoid having to write one yourself:

function utf8_to_codepoints($s) {
    return unpack('V*', iconv('UTF-8', 'UCS-4LE', $s));
}

$data= "Caf\xc3\xa9 \xe6\x97\xa5\xe6\x9c\xac \xf0\x9d\x84\x9e"; // Café 日本 𝄞
var_export(utf8_to_codepoints($data));

gives:

array (
  1 => 67,
  2 => 97,
  3 => 102,
  4 => 233,
  5 => 32,
  6 => 26085,
  7 => 26412,
  8 => 32,
  9 => 119070,
)

which can be converted to U+nnnn format using dechex.

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First of all, here's the document that definitively defines UTF-8 encoding.

The two octets in your example: 110xxxxx 10xxxxxx encode one Unicode character. Its binary code is - well, just take those x's (bits) and put them together. You'll get a number - in binary, but you can convert it to decimal or hexadecimal if you want. That's the same number as XXXX in U+XXXX.

How did I know that 110xxxxx 10xxxxxx encode one character? There may be three kinds of octets in a UTF-8 stream:

  • 10xxxxxx - trailing octets
  • 0xxxxxxx - ASCII characters
  • 110xxxxx, 1110xxxx, etc. - leading octets in the sequence.

Sequences of leading and trailing octets are used to encode Unicode points from 128 and up. 110xxxxx means it starts a sequence of two octets, 1110xxxx starts a sequence of three octets, etc. This way you can isolate sequences from each other. Then take x's from the all octets in the sequence and that's your Unicode code point.

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